Biomega combines clean design and clean commuting in OKO e-bike

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The new Biomega OKO(Credit: Biomega)

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Yet another entrant in the "odd but interesting" electric bike category, the OKO from Danish bicycle company Biomega blends electric-powered mobility and clean, unique carbon fiber design. It's ready to cruise city streets and turn a few heads while doing so.

The OKO packs a fairly standard set of electric bike specs: a front hub motor powered by a 36-volt, 9.9-Ah lithium-ion battery, Gates Carbon Drive belt system, 25- to 40-mile (45- to 64-km) range, and 20 mph (32 km/h) top speed for the US version. It's available with either a SRAM automatic two-speed or Shimano Alfine eight-speed drivetrain.

What separates the OKO from all the other electric bikes we've seen is its unique look. Brought to life by Danish design firm Kibisi, the OKO features a traditional diamond frame with a few serious visual twists. The most prominent of those twists is the oversized rectangular top tube providing shelter to the battery pack.

As they leave that massive top block, the rear triangle and head tube start out downright conventional, mimicking standard tubular bicycle frame design. However, just a bit farther down, they melt away into tire-hugging fenders integrated directly into the rear frame and front fork. The fenders in turn drip into large, flat prongs securing the front and rear wheels. The internal routing of wires and cables helps maintain the bike's clean, modern style.

The OKO's twisted-traditional diamond frame is built from carbon fiber, and the complete bike weighs in at 41 lb (18.6 kg). Biomega is offering the bike for preorder now and plans to begin deliveries in January. It's available in three sizes and is priced just under €1,600 for the two-speed and just under €1,920 for the eight-speed. LA-based Scandinavian design shop Austere has also advertised preordering for $2,295/$2,695.

Source: Biomega

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