Wooden high-rise planned for Stockholm

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If the project goes ahead it will rise to a height of 20 stories and include 240 apartments that overlook the port of Loudden, Stockholm (Image: Tham & Videgård Arkitekte)

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Stockholm's Tham & Videgård Arkitekter has proposed four interconnected high-rise apartment blocks constructed from wood. Still in the planning stage at present, if the project goes ahead it will rise to a height of 20 stories and include 240 apartments that overlook the sea in Loudden, a former busy international harbor in Stockholm that's currently under redevelopment.

The firm designed the unnamed residential development, which comprises a total floorspace of 24,700 sq m (265,868 sq ft), as four separate towers with significant gaps in-between each tower rather than a large block so as to not completely block the view toward the sea for other nearby buildings. This also enables sunlight to reach a nearby quay promenade. Each tower is connected by a three-story base that's angled to create sheltered exterior spaces suitable for outdoor activities and features sedum plants to reduce stormwater runoff.

If all goes well and it's actually built, the project will be constructed entirely from Swedish solid wood, says the firm, including the frame, facade, window frames, doors, and finishes. A rooftop garden will top each tower and a 1,000 sq m (10,763 sq ft) solar panel array will also be installed on the roofs to provide electricity, though Tham & Videgård Arkitekter told us that it hasn't yet worked out how much juice this can be expected to produce.

We've discussed the benefits and drawbacks of constructing tall buildings with wood in greater detail previously, and for the project to be realized, Tham & Videgård Arkitekter will need to deal with not inconsiderable challenges, especially with regard to city planners and the perceived increased risk of fire.

On this note, a company representative told Gizmag that it's now in the local municipality's hands as to whether or not the project goes ahead. If the green light is given, construction is expected to take around four years.

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