Aircraft

Remote-control Flying Pterodactyl flaps its wings and screeches

Remote-control Flying Pterodac...
The Flying Pterodactyl comes with its own remote, although it's available for lower pledge levels if you supply your own
The Flying Pterodactyl comes with its own remote, although it's available for lower pledge levels if you supply your own
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The Flying Pterodactyl comes with its own remote, although it's available for lower pledge levels if you supply your own
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The Flying Pterodactyl comes with its own remote, although it's available for lower pledge levels if you supply your own
The Flying Pterodactyl comes with a set of more pterodactyl-like legs, for displaying it when it's not in use
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The Flying Pterodactyl comes with a set of more pterodactyl-like legs, for displaying it when it's not in use
The Flying Pterodactyl in flight
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The Flying Pterodactyl in flight
The Flying Pterodactyl has a range of 1,600 feet (500 m)
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The Flying Pterodactyl has a range of 1,600 feet (500 m)
The Flying Pterodactyl's planned retail price is $400
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The Flying Pterodactyl's planned retail price is $400

People have actually claimed to have seen living pterosuars – just Google the word "ropen" – although those alleged sightings tend to be confined to far-flung places such as Papua New Guinea. That could be about to change, however, if a new Kickstarter campaign is successful. Ohio-based PaulG Toys is raising production funds for a radio-controlled pterodactyl, that actually flies by flapping its wings.

The Flying Pterodactyl's body is made mainly from lightweight foam. It's 3 feet long with a 5-foot wingspan (0.9 x 1.5 m), and is steered with its two webbed feet – turning one foot down and the other one up causes it to turn left or right, putting both feet up makes it climb, and putting them both down causes it to descend.

One charge of its 11.1-volt 1,300-mAh battery should reportedly be good for 15 to 20 minutes of flight time, and that battery can be swapped for a fully-charged optional extra on the spot. The pterodactyl has an operational range of 1,600 feet (500 m) and when it inevitably crashes, its wing and leg joints are designed to pop off so they don't get permanently broken.

The Flying Pterodactyl has a range of 1,600 feet (500 m)
The Flying Pterodactyl has a range of 1,600 feet (500 m)

As an added bonus, its eyes light up red to indicate that it's powered up, plus it emits what we can only assume is a realistic screeching sound. In order to catch footage of terrified onlookers, it can also be equipped with an optional GoPro camera harness.

If it sounds like your kinda toy, a pledge of US$250 will get you one – when and if they're ready to wreak havoc. The planned retail price is $400.

The Flying Pterodactyl can be seen in action, in the video below.

Source: Kickstarter

RC Flying Pterodactyl

9 comments
Tom Lee Mullins
I think that is way cool.
dukexteme
War Games https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=4ID4cRzNjPM
Grahamw
Extremely good fun.. for all of five minutes. I think interest would fade quickly. hang on a mo- I thought Pterodactyls were gliders, not flappers?
The Skud
They would still have to flap a bit to keep momentum, but I agree this R/C model does overdo the 'flap' thing. Perhaps program a 'glide' mode at suitable intervals? The wingspan might need increasing - a trade-off between glide ability and weight limiting flying time? If I had one I would fit it with an infra-red globe or two so I could track it at dusk with night vision goggles and fly it near unsuspecting campers - he he he.
David Evans
Pterodactyls would have to flap in order to gain height, unless they relied entirely on slope lift or thermals. However I don't think they looked much like this. They had long tapering wings with no internal bracing.
Alexander Lowe
Pterosaurs (the correct term) were fully capable of active, flapping flight - even the gigantic ones, although the largest probably used thermals for soaring, once airborne. 'Pterodactyl' properly refers to a single genus of pterosaur, Pterodactylus.
Joe Sobotka
Its basically an onithopter shaped like a Pterodactyl. So ya,, its wings are going to flap a Lot in order to fly. I've built rubber band powered ornithopters.
Charl.H.Schul
This is great ! Would it be possible to allow a certain amount of gliding in order to reduce energy input ? Furthermore , would it be possible to reduce the scale or enlarge it , with a better payload since there are carbon fibres and other materials which can be used to make it stronger and larger ?
DeAntonio
This, nothing new, design been years from Mr Kazuhiko Kakuta, I've been following his work closely, was this adopted from his design? Did HK just adopt his design? All his hinges and outstanding features are very alike. He created more than this, nightfury,butterfly,dragonfly,flapter,kestrel, you name it....