Marine

Radinn electric wakeboard lets riders get rid of the boat

The Radinn in action
The Radinn in action
View 4 Images
The Radinn in action
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The Radinn in action
The board currently can travel at up to 25 knots (29 mph or 46 km/h), although the final commercial version will likely be able to go faster
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The board currently can travel at up to 25 knots (29 mph or 46 km/h), although the final commercial version will likely be able to go faster
It has a lightweight carbon fiber body, a custom-made jet propulsion system, and is powered by a lithium battery
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It has a lightweight carbon fiber body, a custom-made jet propulsion system, and is powered by a lithium battery
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Wakeboarding sure looks like a lot of fun, but it does have at least one limiting factor – you need to find someone else to go out on the water with you, to pilot the boat. Swedish entrepreneurs Alexander Lind and Philip Werner decided to do something about that, and created the Radinn electric wakeboard. While it doesn't provide you with a wake on which to do tricks, it does let you go out when and wherever you want.

Currently in working prototype form, the Radinn has a carbon fiber body, a salt water-resistant jet propulsion system, and is powered by a lithium battery pack. That pack sits in a watertight compartment, and it can be removed for easy charging – this also means that if users get an extra battery, they can swap it in as soon as the first one gets low. The whole board, including battery, weighs about 29 kg (64 lb).

Speed is controlled by a wireless waterproof handheld remote. The board currently can travel at up to 25 knots (29 mph or 46 km/h), although the final commercial version will likely be able to go faster. One charge of the battery should reportedly be good for 45 to 60 minutes of use at mixed speeds, or 20 to 30 when going full-out.

It has a lightweight carbon fiber body, a custom-made jet propulsion system, and is powered by a lithium battery
It has a lightweight carbon fiber body, a custom-made jet propulsion system, and is powered by a lithium battery

Regular wakeboard foot bindings are used, and they can be removed for people who are still learning – with the bindings out of the way, newbies can start by lying or kneeling on the board.

Lind tells us that the Radinn was just launched at the Cannes Yachting Festival, and is priced at €15,000 (about US$19,375). It should go into production this winter (Northern Hemisphere), with delivery to people who have pre-ordered planned for next year.

The board may face some direct competition, in the forms of the less-expensive Waterwolf and Aquila electric surfboards. Other possible competitors include the gas-powered PowerSki JetBoard, and – for people who are OK with not standing while riding – the Kymera powered body board.

You can see the Radinn being put through its paces, in the video below.

Source: Radinn

Electric powered wakeboard by RADINN

5 comments
BigGoofyGuy
I think that is cool but a little pricey. I can see how the competition might have an edge price wise.
chomper
For the same money I could buy 4 or 5 Aquilas. Besides, there's something missing on this wakeboard...no boat means no wake!!! The good news is that at $20,000 they won't have any problem keeping up with orders.
Jay Finke
That is the best preforming one yet, looks like a blast. 60 lbs is not too bad, would be nice to be able to change it to a scuba DPV mode.
jerryd
Sorry but something is wrong here. 1 kwhr of lithium battery weighs about 22lbs. No way this is going for 30 minutes, much less their claims. Fact is getting 15-20 minutes would be doing well in this unit with 1.5kwhr. You can't beat physics they say they do. The math doesn't work especially since the tiny jetdrive isn't very eff either. You need volume to do water drive eff.
Doug Halkenhauser
More like a wake surfer sans boat. I cannot see doing tricks since the rope is an important tool in making the tricks work. And I don't think you would be able to ski switch on this board:)
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