Urban Transport

Three-wheeled "kickless" longboard is moved by swaying riders

Three-wheeled "kickless" longb...
The board's name, Dokido, comes from the Japanese words for "synchronization" and "way"
The board's name, Dokido, comes from the Japanese words for "synchronization" and "way"
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The underside of the Dokido
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The underside of the Dokido
A top view of the Dokido
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A top view of the Dokido
The Dokido's Shark front wheels
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The Dokido's Shark front wheels
The Dokido's Saucerang-equipped rear wheel
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The Dokido's Saucerang-equipped rear wheel
The board's name, Dokido, comes from the Japanese words for "synchronization" and "way"
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The board's name, Dokido, comes from the Japanese words for "synchronization" and "way"

Although we've been seeing a lot of variations on the electric skateboard lately, it seems that there's also still room for innovation with good ol' human-powered boards. Such is the case with the Dokido, a three-wheeled longboard that the user moves forward by swishing their hips.

Created by North Carolina-based entrepreneur Kaz Kumada, the Dokido forgoes the usual two rear wheels for a single big one.

Mounted in a slot cut into the middle of the flexible deck, that polyurethane wheel features an off-center weighted aluminum hub, known as the Saucerang. This setup allows the rider to turn the wheel by rocking their body weight – a combination of one rock forward and one rock back turns the wheel one complete revolution forward. No stepping off and kicking against the ground is required, although users can still do so for an added boost.

A top view of the Dokido
A top view of the Dokido

According to Kumada, his design not only helps riders to build their balance skills and to get a good core workout, but it's also easier on the joints than a regular skateboard. In fact, he invented the Dokido after experiencing knee problems of his own.

The deck is made from eight laminated layers of bamboo, along with a bottom layer of carbon fiber for added strength. Some of the board's other features include front and rear polyurethane protective bumpers, sealed rear bearings, and Shark-brand front wheels – the latter are claimed to offer a smoother and faster ride than traditional skateboard wheels, along with providing more traction.

The whole thing tips the scales at a claimed 14 lb, 6 oz (6.5 kg), and can accommodate riders weighing up to 265 lb (120 kg).

Should you be interested in getting a Dokido of your own, you can do so via its current Kickstarter project. A pledge of US$699 is required, with the planned retail price sitting at $899. Assuming the board reaches production, it should ship to backers next April.

You can see it in action below.

Dokido – The Self-Propelling longboard Reimagined (Canceled)

Source: Kickstarter

4 comments
kwalispecial
It looks kinda cool, but after watching the Kickstarter video, that thing is a big wiff. The herky-jerky movement to propel it forward looks no better than what you could do with any skateboard - or office chair, for that matter - just by shuffling your weight along. If you want to move a skateboard without putting your feet down, you're better off just tacking (aka tic-tac), which can actually generate some speed.
Steve Alvarez
I concur with kwalispecial.
Vincent Laros
kwalispecial & Steve Alvarez, have you guys nbever heard of pumping a longboard? Tick-Tacking is a way to get going, but one might as well push a couple of time before starting the pumping action. https://www.ridingboards.com/longboard-pumping
Jenny Ziffle
I'm no expert, but I've been riding skateboards for 35 years. I have seen some crazy innovations over the years, but this has to be by far the dumbest thing I have ever seen. That motion is hideous! Also, there are already much better designs if your goal is not to push, such as Carver skateboards which have a wonderful flow and surfy feel, for a fraction of the price. When I first saw the video for the dokido, I thought it was a joke at first, as it played like an SNL bit.