Electronics

XYZ's new scanner provides simple, low-cost 3D modelling

XYZ's new scanner provides si...
XYZ's new device makes use of Intel RealSense camera tech
XYZ's new device makes use of Intel RealSense camera tech
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The scanner connects via USB 3.0 working with Windows 8.1 and up, though you'll need a machine packing at least a 4th-generation Intel Core Processor for it to work
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The scanner connects via USB 3.0 working with Windows 8.1 and up, though you'll need a machine packing at least a 4th-generation Intel Core Processor for it to work
XYZ Printing's handheld scanner is designed to allow users to scan 3D objects of practically any shape, producing full-color images
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XYZ Printing's handheld scanner is designed to allow users to scan 3D objects of practically any shape, producing full-color images
XYZ's new device makes use of Intel RealSense camera tech
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XYZ's new device makes use of Intel RealSense camera tech
Once an object has been scanned, the 3D model can be viewed and enhanced via included software, before being sent to a 3D printer
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Once an object has been scanned, the 3D model can be viewed and enhanced via included software, before being sent to a 3D printer
At present the maximum scan size is 60 x 60 x 30 cm (23.6 x 23.6 x 11.8 in), though the company claims that that could increase before launch, potentially allowing users to scan entire human bodies
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At present the maximum scan size is 60 x 60 x 30 cm (23.6 x 23.6 x 11.8 in), though the company claims that that could increase before launch, potentially allowing users to scan entire human bodies
The device is powered by Intel RealSense technology
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The device is powered by Intel RealSense technology
XYZ's product is compact, weighs just 198 g (0.4 lb) and is operated with only one hand
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XYZ's product is compact, weighs just 198 g (0.4 lb) and is operated with only one hand

XYZ Printing's Handheld 3D Scanner is low-cost and convenient, providing users with a compact tool for producing full-color 3D models. Gizmag saw the device – which makes use of Intel RealSense tech – in action at IFA 2015.

The device is designed to allow users to scan 3D objects of practically any shape, producing full-color images. At present the maximum scan size is 60 x 60 x 30 cm (23.6 x 23.6 x 11.8 in), though the company claims that could increase before launch, potentially allowing users to scan entire human bodies.

The device is powered by Intel RealSense technology, which had a big presence at IFA 2015. The company claims that the tech is ideal for its product, allowing for fast scanning and processing. Once an object has been scanned, the 3D model can be viewed and enhanced via included software, before being sent to a 3D printer.

The scanner connects via USB 3.0 working with Windows 8.1 and up, though you'll need a machine packing at least a 4th-generation Intel Core Processor for it to work
The scanner connects via USB 3.0 working with Windows 8.1 and up, though you'll need a machine packing at least a 4th-generation Intel Core Processor for it to work

The great thing about XYZ's scanner is perhaps its ease of use. We've seen similar products that can scan in much higher resolutions (such as Fuel3D's Scanify), but XYZ's product is compact, weighs just 198 g (0.4 lb) and is operated with only one hand. It connects via USB 3.0 working with Windows 8.1 and up, though you'll need a machine packing at least a 4th-generation Intel Core Processor for it to work.

The other big thing that the XYZ Handheld 3D Scanner has going for it is its price. It'll cost just €199 (US$222) when it lands in shops in November.

Source: XYZ Printing

5 comments
digi_owl
Do wonder if the Intel CPU requirement is a Intel driver thing or not. I applaud the camera tech, but i fear it being hog tied to other Intel tech for marketing reasons.
christopher
I've seen this tech about 10 years ago, using old digital cameras and software to stitch 3D scenes together automatically - it had 2 modes - one where you grabbed the object and moved it all around (the software was smart enough to work out your hands and remove them from the result - camera stayed still - eg - scanning in a toy car), and the other mode where you moved the camera (eg: scanning in a building). From memory, they patented it all as well...
DonGateley
If reviews are favorable and comprehensive this could push my want button hard. I am mainly interested in whatever macro capability it has. What I want to scan is small, about the size of a full ear canal and I need detail.
splatman
Autodesk's 123D Catch does it free, with AFAIK no size limit. http://www.123dapp.com/catch