There are millions of chocaholics in the world fighting to enjoy the sweet treat in moderation, lest they end up looking like Augustus Gloop. According to Nestlé, a team of scientists in Lausanne has managed to structure sugar differently, which could help create delicious chocolate that's easier on the waistline.

The team at Nestlé says that the new structure allows for a "significant" decrease in the amount of sugar used in chocolate without ruining the taste. The new discovery is designed to dissolve in the mouth without delivering as much sugar to the stomach, allowing for a sweet, normal taste in a healthier package.

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Beyond that, precious little detail is available about the new compound. We've reached out to Néstle for more information, and will keep you updated on their response. We do know the faster dissolving compound is currently being patented by the company, and should start showing up in confectionery products from 2018.

"This truly groundbreaking research is inspired by nature and has the potential to reduce total sugar by up to 40 percent in our confectionery," says Stefan Catsicas, Nestlé Chief Technical Officer. "Our scientists have discovered a completely new way to use a traditional, natural ingredient."

Nestle isn't alone in searching for a great-tasting alternative to sugar. Stevia (a plant-based sweetener that's been used commercially since the 1970s) and Splenda (an artificial sweetener based on sucralose) are two of the current alternatives to regular sugar, while researchers are working to make Brazzein commercially viable, too.

Source: Nestlé

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