The Magpul FMG9 Netbook-sized Folding Machine Gun

2 pictures

View gallery - 2 images

You can’t always judge a book by its cover and the Netbook-sized Magpul FMG9 is about as deceptive as they come. It looks like an industrial torch or a portable radio, and will fit in a girl’s handbag or the back pocket of a pair of jeans. One click later, the spring-assisted deployment mechanism snaps and you have a sub machine gun ready to fire. The innocuous FMG acronym stands for Folding Machine Gun and its small size and lightweight polymer casing belie its firepower - folded it holds 31 9x19 mm NATO rounds in a Glock magazine and although the prototype was only semi-automatic, a fully automatic version will almost certainly be available if production goes ahead. What’s the bet Q hands one of these to 007 in the next movie?

The Magpul Folding Machine Gun (FMG9) is a rapidly-deployable, ultra-concealable personal defense weapon currently in development for military, law-enforcement and private security operators. It is designed to offer maximum firepower and control in a compact and discreet package. The non-firing prototype was unveiled during the 2008 SHOT Show and features a streamlined polymer casing, ready-to-fire push-button deployment, Glock 17 slide assembly, capability to accept up to 31-round Glock 18 magazines (in the folded position), top Picatinny (MIL-STD-1913A) rail and a detachable carrying handle with light shield.

An Insight Technologies tactical light was mounted on the prototype. Additional space allows for an auto-sear to be installed for qualified users. The FMG9 is currently a conceptual prototype. No determination of production of the system has been finalized.

If the weapon were to be produced it would be regulated by the National Firearms Act of 1934. The semi-automatic version would most likely be classified as a Short-Barreled Rifle (SBR) or Any-Other Weapon (AOW) depending on an evaluation from the ATF Firearms Technology Branch. This would require a registered transfer only to qualified individuals. Fully-automatic versions would be classified as a post ’86 Machine-Gun (MG) and would not be available to individuals other than Class 3 dealers, military and law enforcement personnel.

The reliably accurate David Crane has had his hands on the prototype.

View gallery - 2 images

Top stories

Recommended for you

Latest in Mobile Technology

Latest phone comparisons

Editors Choice