Bicycles

Rogue C6 smart bicycle takes aim at the urban commuter

Rogue C6 smart bicycle takes a...
The Rogue C6 carbon fiber bicycle integrates GPS systems and is designed for commuters
The Rogue C6 carbon fiber bicycle integrates GPS systems and is designed for commuters
View 12 Images
An iOS companion app displays information such as speed, cadence, elevation and a map for navigation
1/12
An iOS companion app displays information such as speed, cadence, elevation and a map for navigation
The bike has integrated lights on the seatpost and the handlebars, which are said to last for around 60 hours at a time
2/12
The bike has integrated lights on the seatpost and the handlebars, which are said to last for around 60 hours at a time
The Rogue C6 carbon fiber bicycle integrates GPS systems and is designed for commuters
3/12
The Rogue C6 carbon fiber bicycle integrates GPS systems and is designed for commuters
The bike's carbon fiber belt drive doesn't require any lubrication and is said to be lighter, cleaner and last longer than a chain
4/12
The bike's carbon fiber belt drive doesn't require any lubrication and is said to be lighter, cleaner and last longer than a chain
The Rogue C6 is fitted with an Alfine eight-speed gearing system
5/12
The Rogue C6 is fitted with an Alfine eight-speed gearing system
The Rogue C6's carbon fiber frame weighs in at 3.9 lb (1.7 kg)
6/12
The Rogue C6's carbon fiber frame weighs in at 3.9 lb (1.7 kg)
The Rogue C6's carbon fiber frame weighs in at 3.9 lb (1.7 kg)
7/12
The Rogue C6's carbon fiber frame weighs in at 3.9 lb (1.7 kg)
The bike's carbon fiber belt drive doesn't require any lubrication and is said to be lighter, cleaner and last longer than a chain
8/12
The bike's carbon fiber belt drive doesn't require any lubrication and is said to be lighter, cleaner and last longer than a chain
The bike has integrated lights on the seatpost and the handlebars
9/12
The bike has integrated lights on the seatpost and the handlebars
An iOS companion app displays information such as speed, cadence, elevation and a map for navigation
10/12
An iOS companion app displays information such as speed, cadence, elevation and a map for navigation
The Rogue C6 is fitted with Shimano Alfine hydraulic disc brakes, hubs, dual platform pedals compatible with both cleats and shoes
11/12
The Rogue C6 is fitted with Shimano Alfine hydraulic disc brakes, hubs, dual platform pedals compatible with both cleats and shoes
The Rogue C6 has an overall weight of 20.5 lb (9.3 kg)
12/12
The Rogue C6 has an overall weight of 20.5 lb (9.3 kg)

Many cities around the world are experiencing a massive upswing in commuter cycling. But often the vehicles of choice for these motivated nine-to-fivers is either a mountain bike converted for the road, or a road bike converted for shorter trips. At least that's the way Washington-based engineer David Lupafya sees it, whose sleek Rogue C6 bicycle is aimed at walking the line between comfort and durability.

A keen cyclist himself, Lupafya says he conceived the Rogue C6 when he couldn't find a vehicle that suited his needs as a leisurely rider. The driving forces of his approach were the need to develop something reliable with high-end components, that also incorporated new technologies.

The Rogue C6's carbon fiber frame weighs in at 3.9 lb (1.7 kg), which Lupafya says is around 50 to 60 percent lighter than steel or aluminum bikes of similar shapes and sizes. Another factor that sets the Rogue C6 apart is its shunning of the oily, maintenance-heavy chainsets of traditional bikes. Its Gates carbon fiber belt drive doesn't require any lubrication and is said to be lighter, cleaner and last longer than a chain.

The Rogue C6 is fitted with Shimano Alfine hydraulic disc brakes, hubs, dual platform pedals compatible with both cleats and shoes, along with an Alfine eight-speed gearing system.

An iOS companion app displays information such as speed, cadence, elevation and a map for navigation
An iOS companion app displays information such as speed, cadence, elevation and a map for navigation

On the technology side of things, the bike has integrated lights in the seatpost and 200 lumen lights in the handlebars. An iOS companion app works with the GPS system and displays information such as speed, cadence, elevation and a map for navigation.

The second function of the GPS is aimed at preventing it from going missing. If the bike is stolen, its owner can send it an SMS, to which the bike responds with its current GPS coordinates. If the bike is out of range, however, a two-way cellular transmitter will send through its location using triangulation to within 30 ft (9 m).

Lupafya is looking to raise funds on Kickstarter for production. There are five frame sizes, ranging from extra small for people around 5 ft 2 in (160 cm) in height, up to extra large for those up to 6 ft 5 in (198 cm). Sky blue, blood orange and matte black are the colors to choose from. With a campaign goal of US$50,000, a pledge of $1,950 will have a Rogue C6 sent your way in April 2015 if everything runs as planned.

You can hear from Lupafya in his pitch video below.

Source: Rogue C6

9 comments
wle
belt drive inefficient those fenders what are they supposed to do? the back one will not "fend" the lights dim GPS that has to connect to a phone.. doesn;t everyone;s phone have gps already? completely wrong about -no bike is lighter, plenty are already --and they don;t cost $5000 -no bike ever invented like this anyway it;s silly there should be a law against "engineer-slash-designers'' see this for a complete skewering: http://bikesnobnyc.blogspot.com/2010/01/swallowing-pride-changing-your-approach.html wle
VoiceofReason
There is a reason that most commuter bikes aren't carbon fiber. Repeated stress cracks it. A good buddy of mine if doing a tour across the US. He can't use his multi-thousand dollar carbon fiber bike. Riding it for 60-100 miles for 60 days straight is apparently not a good idea. So this is equally dumb for a bike that will see daily use. Not a thing wrong with aluminum, Ti, or even good old steel. Pro cyclists have uber- lightweight bicycles. They also tend to have the luxury of the SAG wagon and personal mechanic for parts or even complete bike swap. I ride what I think will hold up to the abuse my butt will put it through. Performance may suffer a bit, but form, function, and durability rate higher on my selection criteria than performance on my commuter.
wahip
Nice bike, (especially for under $2000), with the Alfine hubs and some interesting design ideas. I do agree with VOR though, nothing wrong with alum or cr-moly frames. As for the comments of wle; every one of them is false or irrelevant!
DarkSymphony
It's a pretty nice looking bike, but I'm actually a little surprised at the weight of it. I use a folding Tern P18 as my commuter which weighs in at a shade under 12kg kitted out with lights, mudguards, saddlebag etc; I expected a CF commuter to be quite a lot lighter. My other slight concern is that the frame looks to be quite short; the clearance between pedal and front wheel looks as little as my track bike, and I always find that to be a little bit of a pain with regards to catching the wheel with my shoes when having to turn tight at low speed (something relatively common on a commute.) Love the GPS integration for theft though, seen enough bikes disappear to wish I had that integrated into mine!
telocity
I have stopped driving a car almost a year ago now. My average daily commute in normally between 20-30 miles. I have had time while riding to consider what I like in a bicycle. Carbon fiber doesn't even get on the list. Yes its 50% lighter...its 4lbs so a 4lbs savings for a LOT more expense. No thanks. Rather have motor assist. As for gates belt, it seems a major improvement over chain for daily use, but what about shaft drives? They are proven technology and are less expensive and are completely sealed. Yes I know they say its not as efficient as a chain or belt, but who cares if your going to work and have motor assist. Its about being able to hop on the bike and go without thinking about the bike to much. It should just work. To that end I would prefer a heavier puncture resistant tire wide enough to be able to go on short dirt paths if necessary, along with heavier wheel and spokes that don't break. Also a carrier area up front as well a extended area in back. for transporting items. I like disc brakes, I feel they have better stopping power on steep hills and if you do break a spoke your wheel doesn't start braking on you as it will with regular brakes do to wheel wobble. Check out the PROTANIUM SHAFT DRIVE bike, it looks closer to what is needed, but still lacking. http://ecruiserbikes.com/our-bikes/shaft-drive/
Andrew Hyde
Nice bike, well thought out and the price is right. I could see this being a good set of wheels for many urban riders. The bike is light enough but not ultra-light so I imagine the fibre construction is heavier and more durable than a high-performance road bike which would weigh less than half this. Correctly engineered carbon fibre is well up to the task, I have a 20 year old Giant CFM3 mountain bike, turned commuter which has done more than 50,000 kms, some of that over some seriously rugged Colorado trails with no sign of stress fractures. Comments by wle are incorrect and/or irrelevant. I've been riding my prototype bamboo with carbon/epoxy lugs urban commuter bike for over a year now and can say that this style of bike works very well. Alfine 11 in-hub gear with Gates Carbon Drive belt is very user friendly. I've used Avid's BB7 disc brakes as they are simple and effective. An Interlock seat post lock is a recent addition and a great way quickly secure the bike for short periods. I have a pair of Helios bars on the way which will add forward and side lighting, smart-phone compatibility and GPS tracking. The bamboo/carbon frame weighs 1.6 kg and total weight is 10 kg.
Noel K Frothingham
wie, 1. What rear fender? 2. Many cellphones do NOT have a user-based GPS onboard. Those that do 3. Please go back to the Gizmat article and explain what the following actually means: "no bike ever invented like this anyway ". 4. Carbon fiber has its problems, but rarely start cracking unless the individual that builds the frame has not reinforced the tubing junctions adequately or has failed to apply the carbon fiber so that one layer of fiber crosses the fiber layer beneath it on the bias. Whether you see the need for high strength tubing or use carbon fiber to build a bike is irrelevant. Other people do and industry is responding to their newly acquired potential customers desires because the need is there.
WagTheDog
For the same price you can get FOUR tough and comfy Trek Pure or Electra Townie bikes that are unparalleled for comfort due to the almost-low-rider straight-up seating. Just add a big, fat saddle for your tush, and you'll never look back!
Bruce H. Anderson
The fenders are interesting to say the least. As a design statement, well....OK. A larger arc with an attachment to the frame/fork would make them much lighter and more effective.