Studio Rotor was recently tasked with designing a new electric people carrier for Special Mobility in The Netherlands, a company that specializes in mobility solutions for airports, hospitals and other public spaces. Aimed at ensuring people with reduced mobility safely get from gate to gate in comfort, its Multimobby concept seats seven passengers, has low level entry, and though not autonomous, has onboard sensors to monitor obstacles and people and avoid collisions. And it can turn all the way around on the spot.

The Multimobby electric PRM (people with reduced mobility) transporter is reported able to comfortably seat seven passengers and one driver in a vehicle size generally only capable of hauling a total of five. The blocky buggy measures 294 x 109 x 198 cm (116 x 43 x 78 in), including a beacon but not including an optional luggage rack at the back. Much of the luggage can be stowed away under passenger seating, but if a luggage rack is installed, a Mobby transport wheelchair can be hooked and pulled along.

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The vehicle benefits from a high-walled enclosure that makes sure everyone stays put and the driver can see above all passenger heads thanks to a raised seat. Where some airport buggies can require passengers to climb aboard – literally – the Multimobby benefits from low entry points for minimum step on, step off ease. Should the large swing doors accidentally open during transit, the vehicle will be brought to a stop.

Much of the tech is currently being kept under wraps, but distance sensors and optional cameras front and back have been mentioned, for auto sensing of the surroundings. It's reported capable of 360 degree on-the-spot turning and will adapt its speed to match bustling (slow speed) or empty (faster) airports.

Multimobby prototypes are currently being tested at Brussels Airport in Belgium and Heathrow Airport, London, UK. The video below shows the vehicle scooting around Brussels Airport.

Source: Studio Rotor

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