Architecture

ZeroCabin offers rustic off-grid living in kit form

ZeroCabin offers rustic off-gr...
The ZeroCabin is designed by a team in Chile with no formal architecture training
The ZeroCabin is designed by a team in Chile with no formal architecture training
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The ZeroCabin is designed by a team in Chile with no formal architecture training
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The ZeroCabin is designed by a team in Chile with no formal architecture training
The ZeroCabin runs off-the-grid and gets all its electricity from a solar panel array that's situated on its roof ?
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The ZeroCabin runs off-the-grid and gets all its electricity from a solar panel array that's situated on its roof ?
A large deck area at its front allows for sun-drenched relaxation
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A large deck area at its front allows for sun-drenched relaxation
ZeroCabin is raised above the ground on wooden stilts
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ZeroCabin is raised above the ground on wooden stilts
The ZeroCabin features generous glazing
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The ZeroCabin features generous glazing
The ZeroCabin's first floor is accessed by steps and a trapdoor
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The ZeroCabin's first floor is accessed by steps and a trapdoor
The ZeroCabin's living area includes a sofa bed
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The ZeroCabin's living area includes a sofa bed
The ZeroCabin's bedroom upstairs is reached by some steps
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The ZeroCabin's bedroom upstairs is reached by some steps
The ZeroCabin's first floor includes a kitchenette and a dining area with drop-down table
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The ZeroCabin's first floor includes a kitchenette and a dining area with drop-down table
The ZeroCabin's wood-burning stove can also be used to heat food
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The ZeroCabin's wood-burning stove can also be used to heat food
The ZeroCabin is heated with a wood burning stove
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The ZeroCabin is heated with a wood burning stove
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The ZeroCabin is a small off-grid cabin made by a team in Chile with no formal architecture training. It can be delivered as a finished turnkey home to locals but is also being sold as a kit for handy types to build their own.

Each ZeroCabin is tailored to suit the clients' needs and local conditions but the model pictured is located on a Puma reserve in southern Chile. It measures 26 sq m (280 sq ft) and is primarily made from wood with metal sheet cladding. It also features biodegradable insulation and was built without using nails so should be relatively recyclable.

The home is raised above the ground on wooden stilts and accessed using steps and a trapdoor. The first floor sports a deck area and a combined living/dining area, with a sofa bed, a small drop-down table, and a basic kitchenette. A small bathroom with composting toilet is nearby and a set of steps lead up to the bedroom, which contains a double bed.

The decor is rustic and simple, which is fine for this kind of cabin, and generous glazing frames the views of the surrounding landscape. Though we've certainly reported on people who live in smaller and simpler homes, it seems best suited as a weekend or vacation retreat.

The ZeroCabin's first floor is accessed by steps and a trapdoor
The ZeroCabin's first floor is accessed by steps and a trapdoor

The cabin runs off-the-grid with a roof-based solar panel array and also features a rainwater collection system that's purified for use as drinking water. A wood-burning stove is installed as the sole heat source and is also used for heating food and boiling water.

A company representative told us that customers can order a "DIY container kit" that can either include most of the materials needed to build their own (with just the timber sourced locally), or only the off-grid tech and plans if preferred. The firm also said that price depends on the local terrain, the size and options of the cabin and so on.

As of writing we're awaiting confirmation on shipping rates and availability from the firm but Dwell reports that it's available for shipping worldwide (which appears to be confirmed by the company on Instagram).

Source: ZeroCabin

View gallery - 11 images
2 comments
ljaques
Starting at only $50k.
Gregory
I like the simplicity. I live in Florida so off the grid requires a baseball bat to fend off the mosquitos. But the stairs caught my eye. Does anyone know who makes them? Thanks