Bicycles

Bike-mounted car-detecting radar system now works with smartphones

Bike-mounted car-detecting rad...
Garmin's Varia Radar RVR315 (left) and RTL515 – the latter puts out up to 65 lumens, and both are IPX7 water-resistant, meaning they can withstand be submerged up to 1 m (3.3 ft) for 30 minutes
Garmin's Varia Radar RVR315 (left) and RTL515 – the latter puts out up to 65 lumens, and both are IPX7 water-resistant, meaning they can withstand be submerged up to 1 m (3.3 ft) for 30 minutes
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Garmin's Varia Radar RVR315 (left) and RTL515 – the latter puts out up to 65 lumens, and both are IPX7 water-resistant, meaning they can withstand be submerged up to 1 m (3.3 ft) for 30 minutes
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Garmin's Varia Radar RVR315 (left) and RTL515 – the latter puts out up to 65 lumens, and both are IPX7 water-resistant, meaning they can withstand be submerged up to 1 m (3.3 ft) for 30 minutes

Five years ago Garmin first introduced its Varia Radar system, which warns cyclists of cars approaching from behind. The company has now announced an updated version, that offers a couple of key improvements over the original.

Just to recap, the first version of Varia Radar consisted of two parts: a rear-facing seatpost-mounted module that sent out radar pulses and received their echoes, along with a wirelessly-connected handlebar unit. Whenever the radar module detected a vehicle closing in from behind (up to a distance of 140 m/495 ft), the rider would be notified via a beeping sound and a column of LEDs on the handlebar unit's display.

The radar module also featured a built-in tail light that flashed more rapidly as motorists got closer, in order to better get their attention. Additionally, if users already had a Garmin Edge cycling computer, they could use it in place of the handlebar unit.

Now, Garmin has split Varia Radar into two products: the RVR315 and the RTL515.

The latter is a lot like the original radar module, although it's now compatible with the Varia iOS/Android smartphone app. This means that riders can use their bar-mounted phone in place of the handlebar unit, which very much becomes an optional extra.

Instead of LEDs, the app's display utilizes color-coded alerts, with green meaning that everything's OK, amber indicating that a vehicle is approaching, and red warning that a vehicle is closing in at high speed. The phone also vibrates and beeps.

The RVR315 offers the same functionality, but forgoes the tail light in order to lessen the bulk and lower the price. It reportedly runs for up to 7 hours per charge of its battery, and is priced at US$149.99. The RTL515 goes for around 6 hours in Night Flash or Solid tail light mode, or up to 16 hours in Day Flash mode – it'll cost you $199.99.

Source: Garmin via BikeRadar

2 comments
Techjunkie88
If only this was more affordable it would be a great product for road safety. I wonder what the actual cost of production is?
kwalispecial
Cool tool, and if I had loads of many to waste, it'd probably be fun to have. For now I think I'll settle for a $10 mirror.