Architecture

Stackable Micro-house incorporates multi-functional living zones

Stackable Micro-house incorpor...
Micro-house, by Chinese firm Liu Lubin, is big enough to facilitate the basic needs that a single occupant requires of a home
Micro-house, by Chinese firm Liu Lubin, is big enough to facilitate the basic needs that a single occupant requires of a home
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Micro-house, by Chinese firm Liu Lubin, is big enough to facilitate the basic needs that a single occupant requires of a home
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Micro-house, by Chinese firm Liu Lubin, is big enough to facilitate the basic needs that a single occupant requires of a home
Micro-house, by Chinese firm Liu Lubin, during the evening
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Micro-house, by Chinese firm Liu Lubin, during the evening
Entrance to the micro-home is via a central staircase
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Entrance to the micro-home is via a central staircase
Each modular unit incorporates all interior furnishings into its main architectural structure, including bookshelves, clothes racks, seating and bedding
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Each modular unit incorporates all interior furnishings into its main architectural structure, including bookshelves, clothes racks, seating and bedding
Chinese architectural firm Studio Liu Lubin has created a “Micro-house” which resembles somewhat of a hybrid between the Space Invaders icon and a Tetris block
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Chinese architectural firm Studio Liu Lubin has created a “Micro-house” which resembles somewhat of a hybrid between the Space Invaders icon and a Tetris block
The home features a central multi-functional living space positioned between two lower modular rooms
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The home features a central multi-functional living space positioned between two lower modular rooms
The main structure of the Micro-house is made using a lightweight fiber reinforced composite
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The main structure of the Micro-house is made using a lightweight fiber reinforced composite
The home facilitates basic living functions for one occupant
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The home facilitates basic living functions for one occupant
Micro-house features large windows for fresh air and natural light
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Micro-house features large windows for fresh air and natural light
Each modular unit incorporates all interior furnishings into its main architectural structure, including bookshelves, clothes racks, seating and bedding
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Each modular unit incorporates all interior furnishings into its main architectural structure, including bookshelves, clothes racks, seating and bedding
Micro-house features a complete bathroom
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Micro-house features a complete bathroom
The two lower modular rooms contain the bathroom and kitchen
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The two lower modular rooms contain the bathroom and kitchen
Bookshelves are built into the home's structure
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Bookshelves are built into the home's structure
The home features a central multi-functional living space positioned between two lower modular rooms
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The home features a central multi-functional living space positioned between two lower modular rooms
Micro-house, by Chinese firm Liu Lubin, is big enough to facilitate the basic needs that a single occupant requires of a home
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Micro-house, by Chinese firm Liu Lubin, is big enough to facilitate the basic needs that a single occupant requires of a home
The modules can be stacked together and each room can be used for a multiple of tasks
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The modules can be stacked together and each room can be used for a multiple of tasks
The modules can be stacked together and each room can be used for a multiple of tasks
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The modules can be stacked together and each room can be used for a multiple of tasks
View gallery - 17 images

Designing small-scale housing requires architects to ensure that every inch of the interior serves a purpose. Various living spaces need to be incorporated and furnishings need to fit perfectly together with no space going to waste. Applying this Tetris-like approach to organization, Chinese architectural firm Studio Liu Lubin has created a Micro-house featuring compact, multiple interior zones that can stacked together or used as a single-occupant dwelling.

The Micro-house features a central multi-functional living space positioned between two lower modular rooms which contain the bathroom and kitchen. Each modular unit incorporates all interior furnishings into its main structure, including bookshelves, clothes racks, seating and bedding. Each room can also be used for a multiple of tasks.

Each modular unit incorporates all interior furnishings into its main architectural structure, including bookshelves, clothes racks, seating and bedding
Each modular unit incorporates all interior furnishings into its main architectural structure, including bookshelves, clothes racks, seating and bedding

The main structure of the Micro-house is made using a lightweight fiber reinforced composite, which promises easy and economic transportation, strong durability and all year protection from the elements according to Studio Liu Lubin. Each module is shaped in the form of a cross with a maximum height and width of 2.4 m (7.87 ft). The interior area of each module is approximately 3.9 sq m (41.9 sq ft), squeezing the entire home (three modules) into an area of just 11.7 sq m (125.95 sq ft).

The modules can be stacked together and each room can be used for a multiple of tasks
The modules can be stacked together and each room can be used for a multiple of tasks

Studio Liu Lubin has also designed the structure so that additional modules can be stacked on top of one another, extending the size of the home for families or multiple habitants. The Micro-house was installed and tested out in a Beijing park earlier this year.

Via: Arch Daily, Designboom

View gallery - 17 images
6 comments
BigGoofyGuy
I like the simplicity yet versatility of the design. I think it has a lot of potential.
wmarsh
O.K. Where's the door? It looks supremely inconvenient.
Jay Finke
I get seasick just looking at it, And I never get seasick. but I could see the use as a mother in-law room just under the second one from the bottom left.
Ruth Vallejos
Um... there are a lot better ways to make 125 sq. ft. habitable for a single occupant or a couple. With a real door and real fresh air for multiple spaces. see www.tumbleweedhouses.com/‎, or http://tinyhousepins.com/
While the clever interlocking of the crosses increases usability, I have trouble with a) walking through windows and b) living without any discernible insulation, and c) if all the modules are linked together - having ventilation only with openings at the ends. With some adjustment I suppose these problems could be addressed. Still - it would feel too much like a hamster "habitrail" for me.
Slowburn
No room for individuality.
August
It is a nice creation, looks like an aquarium.