Outdoors

Canadian inventor creates the mountain bike of walkers

Canadian inventor creates the ...
The Rob's Walkers FR-160 model, hitting the trails on Vancouver Island
The Rob's Walkers FR-160 model, hitting the trails on Vancouver Island
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Rob's Walkers feature circular handles that allow for a variety of hand positions
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Rob's Walkers feature circular handles that allow for a variety of hand positions
Rob's Walkers feature quick-release wheels
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Rob's Walkers feature quick-release wheels
Rob's Walkers feature dual mechanical disc brakes
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Rob's Walkers feature dual mechanical disc brakes
The FR-160 (left) and the FR-120
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The FR-160 (left) and the FR-120
A closer look at the FR-160
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A closer look at the FR-160
The FR-120 in use
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The FR-120 in use
The Rob's Walkers FR-160 model, hitting the trails on Vancouver Island
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The Rob's Walkers FR-160 model, hitting the trails on Vancouver Island
The walker can be folded down (and its wheels removed) for transit
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The walker can be folded down (and its wheels removed) for transit
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Chances are that if you think of someone who uses a walker, you picture them sedately making their way down a smooth sidewalk. Well, Rob's Walkers are for those other walker-users, who like getting into the woods and going off-road.

The device was created by Canadian entrepreneur Robert Anaka, after he lost control of his legs due to multiple sclerosis. In order to continue pursuing his passion for nature photography, he built a rugged walker with knobby, pneumatic tires, suitable for use in the back country of Alberta and British Columbia. Now, he builds the things for paying customers.

There are actually two Rob's Walker models, the FR-120 and the newer FR-160. The former has three 12-inch wheels, while the latter has a 12-incher in front and two 16-inch wheels in the rear. Both versions feature an adjustable-height aluminum frame, dual mechanical disc brakes, a built-in seat for resting, and circular handles that allow for a variety of hand positions.

The FR-160 (left) and the FR-120
The FR-160 (left) and the FR-120

Additionally on both models, the front section of the frame can be folded beneath the rear, and the wheels can be quickly removed, allowing for easier transit within a car. Robert tells us that the FR-120 weighs 26 lb (11.8 kg), while the FR-160 tips the scales at 28 lb (12.7 kg).

He's also working on prototypes that incorporate four wheels for added stability, an automatic braking system, and a ski that can replace the front wheel for use on snow. In order to fund that development, he's launched a Kickstarter campaign, where backers will receive aluminum prints of nature photos that he took while using the walker.

People who wish to actually buy a Rob's Walker can do so via the company website (linked below). The FR-120 is priced at CAD$1,285 (about US$976), while the FR-160 goes for CAD$1,295 (US$984).

Source: Rob's Walkers

View gallery - 8 images
2 comments
Christian Waldmann
This invention is a little too late.
These walkers exist since many years: https://www.trionic.com/en/
Robert Anaka
@Christian Waldmann Kind of a blanket statement that does not reflect what I have designed. I have tried a couple of Trionics over the years and while they are nicely built they do not reflect the capabilities of what I have designed. This is an apples and oranges comparison by you.

To state that my invention is a little too late seems a little bit insulting to something that you have not tested.

So sad that you would stoop so low!