Children

Bespoke Rolls-Royce gets kids to surgery in luxury

Bespoke Rolls-Royce gets kids ...
Hari Rajyaguru was one of the first to test drive the Rolls-Royce SRH at the company's Goodwood Studio, just like all Rolls-Royces VIP customers
Hari Rajyaguru was one of the first to test drive the Rolls-Royce SRH at the company's Goodwood Studio, just like all Rolls-Royces VIP customers
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The team responsible for the Rolls-Royce SRH, alongside representatives from the Pediatric Unit at St Richard’s Hospital and the Matthews and Rajyaguru families
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The team responsible for the Rolls-Royce SRH, alongside representatives from the Pediatric Unit at St Richard’s Hospital and the Matthews and Rajyaguru families
Hari Rajyaguru was one of the first to test drive the Rolls-Royce SRH at the company's Goodwood Studio, just like all Rolls-Royces VIP customers
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Hari Rajyaguru was one of the first to test drive the Rolls-Royce SRH at the company's Goodwood Studio, just like all Rolls-Royces VIP customers
The Rolls-Royce SRH features a two-tone Andalusian White and Salamanca Blue paint job, finished with a hand-applied St James Red coachline
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The Rolls-Royce SRH features a two-tone Andalusian White and Salamanca Blue paint job, finished with a hand-applied St James Red coachline
That's the Rolls-Royce SRH in front
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That's the Rolls-Royce SRH in front
The Rolls-Royce SRH features the Spirit of Ecstasy, just like its bigger brothers
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The Rolls-Royce SRH features the Spirit of Ecstasy, just like its bigger brothers
The Rolls-Royce SRH was constructed by the Bespoke Manufacturing team
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The Rolls-Royce SRH was constructed by the Bespoke Manufacturing team
Hari Rajyaguru and Molly Matthews were the first behind the wheel of the Rolls-Royce SRH
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Hari Rajyaguru and Molly Matthews were the first behind the wheel of the Rolls-Royce SRH
Hari Rajyaguru was one of the first behind the wheel of the Rolls-Royce SRH
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Hari Rajyaguru was one of the first behind the wheel of the Rolls-Royce SRH
Molly Matthews (pictured) and Hari Rajyaguru got to test drive the Rolls-Royce SRH at Rolls-Royce's Goodwood Studio, just like all Rolls-Royces VIP customers
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Molly Matthews (pictured) and Hari Rajyaguru got to test drive the Rolls-Royce SRH at Rolls-Royce's Goodwood Studio, just like all Rolls-Royces VIP customers

Going into surgery can be stressful enough for well-informed adults, but spare a thought for children on their way to the operating theater. As a way to make such journeys a little more enjoyable, Rolls-Royce has constructed a pint-sized vehicle that lets kids drive themselves to the OR in luxury.

The car was built to cruise the corridors of St. Richard's Hospital Pediatric Day Surgery Unit, which is reflected in the vehicle's name: the Rolls-Royce SRH. The hospital is located in the home town of Roll-Royce Motor Cars Limited, Chichester, West Sussex, and features "traffic signs" along the halls that drivers are presumably expected to obey.

Seating just the driver, the Rolls-Royce SRH is powered by a 24-volt gel battery driving an electric motor that propels the car to a top speed of 10 mph (16 km/h). However, parents wanting their child to maintain a "statelier" speed can limit it to 4 mph (6.4 km/h).

The car was produced by The Roll's-Royce Bespoke Manufacturing team, who spent over 400 hours of their own time putting it together, making use of 3D printing and hand-crafting techniques for various components, such as the Spirit of Ecstasy hood ornament and bespoke paddle controls.

The Rolls-Royce SRH features the Spirit of Ecstasy, just like its bigger brothers
The Rolls-Royce SRH features the Spirit of Ecstasy, just like its bigger brothers

Other features include two-tone steering wheel, seats and self-righting wheel centers that are colored to match the vehicle's St James Red coachline. This hand-applied coachline contrasts with the two-tone Andalusian White and Salamanca Blue paint scheme.

"It's wonderful seeing a smiley face on the way to theater, rather than an apprehensive one, and everyone caring for children at St Richard's is so grateful to Rolls-Royce for this unique donation," says Sue Nicholls, Paediatric Matron at Western Sussex Hospitals NSH Foundation Trust. "We know boys and girls alike will love driving it and in the coming years it will help turn a daunting experience into a more fun and enjoyable one for hundreds and hundreds of children."

Source: Rolls-Royce

1 comment
Dan Lewis
I've several concerns regarding the safety and hygiene of the vehicle. I wish I'd read that the vehicle was primarily remote control such that the parent or a nurse would be overseeing the direction and velocity. The car is nearer to the floor/rug; down there where more dust/bacteria/virii are. Ew.