Gene-analyzing diet may help you fit into your jeans

2 pictures

An example of a Habit-made meal(Credit: Habit)

View gallery - 2 images

Perhaps you're one of those people who can eat whatever they want, and not gain weight. Or, perhaps you're just the opposite. In either case, generalized diet advice aimed at "the average person" isn't necessarily going to work for you. That's why Habit was developed. The San Francisco-based service creates unique diet plans tailored to each client, based on an analysis of their DNA.

Clients start by receiving an at-home test kit, that requires them to supply finger-prick blood samples. These samples are taken both before and after consuming an included "proprietary metabolic challenge beverage" that contains sugars, fats and carbohydrates – it's designed to replicate a typical American diet.

Once all the blood samples have been sent to an associated lab, they're analyzed to detect genetic variations within the client's DNA, plus they're used to measure over 60 biomarkers. More specifically, the company is interested in seeing how those biomarkers change in response to consumption of the challenge beverage.

Clients also supply information such as their age, body weight, height, waist circumference, activity level and health goals.

From there, the company combines and analyzes all the data to determine which foods and nutrients are best for the client, and in what amounts. Chefs then prepare personalized meals based on those guidelines, which are couriered to the client's door. It's also possible for clients to choose foods on their own, via both live coaches and an app that is set to their unique nutritional profile.

The service is set to launch early next year. A company representative tells us that the test kit will sell for US$299, which will include initial lab testing, diet recommendations, and a coaching session with a nutritionist. Meals will be priced at about $12 to $15 each.

View gallery - 2 images

Top stories

Recommended for you

Latest in Health & Wellbeing

Editors Choice