Drones

Startup proposes using drones to disinfect stadiums

Startup proposes using drones ...
EagleHawk shows off its system at Sahlen Field
EagleHawk shows off its system at Sahlen Field
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EagleHawk shows off its system at Sahlen Field
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EagleHawk shows off its system at Sahlen Field

It will doubtless be a while yet before big stadium-type events start taking place again. Once they do, though, the stands will still likely have to be disinfected after each use. A US company is aiming to make that task easier, using drones.

Developed by drone-tech startup EagleHawk, the new system was recently demonstrated at Sahlen Field in the company's home city of Buffalo, New York.

The setup incorporates a remotely-controlled tethered octocopter drone, which dispenses a disinfectant mist via two boom-mounted nozzles. That mist drifts down onto the stands, covering all exposed surfaces.

The disinfectant chemicals have reportedly been approved by the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) and the State of New York's Department of Environmental Conservation, as being safe for use around people and as being effective against the COVID-19-causing SARS-CoV-2 virus.

According to EagleHawk, the system allows a larger area to be disinfected in less time than would be possible if doing the task by hand. It's also said to be cheaper, plus it puts fewer workers at risk of exposure.

The company has already received inquiries from several venues, and plans on offering its service to all sports teams in the region.

Source: EagleHawk

3 comments
Kim
That's right, kill the microbiome of the planet. Poison the people some more.....what could possibly go wrong?!?!
Kpar
I knew something like this was coming- no problem. But the fact is, it's only necessary in places that remain in shade. UV light from the sun is a better (and cheaper) disinfectant. I await a roving robot with multiple UV light sources to disinfect rooms, subway cars, buses, aircraft, etc.
akarp
Agree with Kim, we know that trying to sanitize our environment leads to an 'arms race' against 'super-bugs'