Architecture

Green Magic Homes kit lets you assemble your own house – and then bury it

Green Magic Homes kit lets you...
A rendering of an alpine Green Magic Home
A rendering of an alpine Green Magic Home
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Green Magic Homes is now offering prefabricated hobbit-like modular structures, that can be joined up to match buyers' specifications
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Green Magic Homes is now offering prefabricated hobbit-like modular structures, that can be joined up to match buyers' specifications
Inside a Green Magic Home
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Inside a Green Magic Home
Each Green Magic Home is made up of individual fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) arches, which are bolted together sort of like sections of a waterslide
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Each Green Magic Home is made up of individual fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) arches, which are bolted together sort of like sections of a waterslide
The window and door arches protrude, so they won't be covered when the soil is heaped on top
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The window and door arches protrude, so they won't be covered when the soil is heaped on top
A rendering of an alpine Green Magic Home
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A rendering of an alpine Green Magic Home
When soil is added to a Green magic Home, its weight reportedly actually helps press the sections together, adding strength instead of creating structural stress
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When soil is added to a Green magic Home, its weight reportedly actually helps press the sections together, adding strength instead of creating structural stress
A rendering of a Green Magic Home bedroom
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A rendering of a Green Magic Home bedroom
Each Green Magic Home kit includes aluminum doors and windows, along with some fiber cement board components which are joined to the FRP sections using nylon ties and then sealed with an elastomer
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Each Green Magic Home kit includes aluminum doors and windows, along with some fiber cement board components which are joined to the FRP sections using nylon ties and then sealed with an elastomer

Ever since the first Lord of the Rings movie came out, people have been fascinated with the concept of having their own "hobbit home" – a quaint, vaulted house that sits beneath a covering of soil and vegetation. Building your own from scratch, however, could be rather challenging. That's why Green Magic Homes is now offering prefabricated hobbit-like modular structures, that can be joined up to match buyers' specifications. After that, you just add dirt and plants.

Besides looking neat and being cozy, earth-covered homes like these also offer a practical advantage – the soil covering provides excellent insulation, helping to keep the structure warm in winter and cool in the summer. The window and door arches protrude from the sides, so they won't be covered when the soil is heaped on top.

Each Green Magic Home is made up of individual fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) arches, which are bolted together sort of like sections of a waterslide. These joined segments become different types of watertight rooms/modules, which can in turn be linked together to form various styles of homes – buyers can also mix and match modules as they wish.

Each Green Magic Home is made up of individual fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) arches, which are bolted together sort of like sections of a waterslide
Each Green Magic Home is made up of individual fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) arches, which are bolted together sort of like sections of a waterslide

When the soil is added, its weight reportedly actually helps press the sections together, adding strength instead of creating structural stress.

The company's latest module is the Wikiki, a 404-sq ft (37.5-sq m) unit that can serve as a "man cave," guest cottage, art studio, or pretty much whatever you want. It reportedly takes three people three days to put it together, requiring no special skills or heavy equipment … although it's not clear if that includes adding the soil and plants, known as a "living roof."

Every kit includes wooden doors and windows, along with some fiber cement board components which are joined to the FRP sections using nylon ties and then sealed with an elastomer. Conduits and ducts for things like water and ventilation can also be added.

Prices are based on a cost of US$41.74 per square foot, delivered.

Source: Green Magic Homes

18 comments
S Michael
waste of money... Pure horse puky... Maybe that's what they should cover it with.
gizmowiz
I love it. Now if I could only get one a half dozen modules delivered to Colorado.
Cocoa Jackson
This is clever technology we need going forward. Ideal in cyclone / tornado / hurricane & fire prone areas also developing due to global warming with subsequent climate change. ...
kmccune
I love it,but dont think its near that cheap.Animals are much better adapted then Humans,why,to survive,they head underground,think of a structure that actually takes care of you,with proper ventilation it doesnt have to be moldy and damp a solar powered air exchange,dehumidifier could handle all that
Stephen N Russell
Can this adapt to other underground homes IE Shelters & command posts from Terminator movies, Elysium etc too. Or Bond villan Hqs in a micro scale? Be awesome
kuryus
The article fails to mention what the insulating value of the panels is. The covering soil has very little insulating value and 8 feet is the least that does much good. One more thing, the earth and sod they're showing on the sides of the house are far too steep to stay in position. The first good rain will wash them off. The manufacturer needs to look up the term 'angle of repose.' Underground buildings can be really interesting and exciting to be in. But the energy benefits don't have a chance of repaying the construction costs in the lifetimes of 2 owners.
ezeflyer
Will it work as a fallout shelter? We may be needing these soon.
Douglas Bennett Rogers
Very similar to a lot of tornado shelters. Something wrong with price. Molded fiberglass, at about 1/4 in., is $10-20/sq. ft. Areas less than 3 ft. from the surface, or above frost line, need 2-3 in. of foam. Buried basement is usually cheapest thermal mass. This might be cheaper where there aren't a lot of basements.
jerryd
Nice. Here in Fla you can't go underground as the water table it too high but something like this allows almost no heating, cooling costs here. And about the only cost effective use of a shipping container for a home.
Tom Lee Mullins
It is like making ones own Hobbit Hole. I think that is a cool idea.