Automotive

Nissan puts GT-R LM Nismo's racing career on ice

Nissan puts GT-R LM Nismo's ra...
Nissan has pulled its GT-R LM Nismo from the WEC, after problems with its energy recovery system
Nissan has pulled its GT-R LM Nismo from the WEC, after problems with its energy recovery system
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Nissan will reassess its LMP1 program after more testing
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Nissan will reassess its LMP1 program after more testing
The car is front drive, and draws its power from a hybrid powertrain
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The car is front drive, and draws its power from a hybrid powertrain
The LM Nismo battled during its time at Le Mans
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The LM Nismo battled during its time at Le Mans
Nissan has pulled its GT-R LM Nismo from the WEC, after problems with its energy recovery system
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Nissan has pulled its GT-R LM Nismo from the WEC, after problems with its energy recovery system

There were always going to be risks involved in creating an oddball like the GT-R LM Nismo. The radical racecar battled for consistency at Le Mans and now Nissan has pulled the plug on its World Endurance Championship involvement until problems that have plagued its energy recovery system can be sorted out.

With a front-engine, front-drive setup, trick aerodynamics, and front tires that are wider than the rears, the GT-R LM Nismo caught the world's attention when it was unveiled earlier this year. Unfortunately, the LMP1 racer failed to back-up that attention with results – although one of the cars made it to the finish at Le Mans, the LM Nismo was slow all weekend.

The problems centered around the GT-R LM Nismo's energy recovery system, which meant that many of the car's systems were compromised and the workload fell solely on the its 3.0-liter twin-turbo six cylinder motor.

The LM Nismo battled during its time at Le Mans
The LM Nismo battled during its time at Le Mans

"We've said it before but innovation hurts," said Nissan's Global Head of Brand, Marketing and Sales, Darren Cox. "We've built an LMP1 car that is very different to other racing cars as we continue to drive motorsport innovation. This has shown us once again that people want something different in motorsport and that gives us increased motivation to make our LMP1 car competitive."

Nissan will carry on with its testing program until it makes a decision about when the car will return to the World Endurance Championship.

Source: Nissan

3 comments
vblancer
When I first read about this car it struck me that for as long as cars have been around front wheel drive has been a loser on paved tracks. I think this car goes a bit more in the way of throwing dirt in on that coffin.
Al Mayberry
Nissan used a flywheel ERS on the car and that is what failed. I find it very strange that one of the world's foremost electric car makers didn't use an electric ERS of their own design and manufacture. Porsche used an electric ERS as did others. Wake up Nissan and Mr Cox! Let's see the LMP1 with a Nissan electric ERS. Mr Cox, What would a high place finish in the endurance series and or Le Mans do for Nissan's electric car reputation if it had a Nissan electric ERS?? Hello?!?
rexhavoc
Media astounds once again refusing to call a spade a spade - the Nismo GTR LM is a tennis ball in a sock. Front wheel drive was not conceived of by racers seeking the ultimate road performance, it was birthed by manufacturers seeking to lower the manufacturing costs of passenger platforms. Ad campaigners and zealous fans not withstanding - physics cannot be denied.