Automotive

Quanergy announces solid-state LiDAR for self-driving cars

Quanergy announces solid-state...
Quanergy’s LiDAR sensor contains an integrated circuit that has no moving parts, but is capable of scanning in every direction (360 degrees) on both a macro and micro scale
Quanergy’s LiDAR sensor contains an integrated circuit that has no moving parts, but is capable of scanning in every direction (360 degrees) on both a macro and micro scale
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Quanergy’s LiDAR sensor contains an integrated circuit that has no moving parts, but is capable of scanning in every direction (360 degrees) on both a macro and micro scale
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Quanergy’s LiDAR sensor contains an integrated circuit that has no moving parts, but is capable of scanning in every direction (360 degrees) on both a macro and micro scale

Quanergy Systems is set to introduce its first solid-state light detection and ranging (LiDAR) sensor for advanced driver assistance systems and self-driving cars. The system will cost less than US$1,000 per car and was previewed at the Los Angeles Auto Show's Connected Car Expo.

The LiDAR sensor contains an integrated circuit that has no moving parts, but is capable of scanning in every direction (360 degrees) on both a macro and micro scale. This live 3-dimensional view around a car can detect, classify, and track objects in real time.

These sensors, Quanergy says, were designed from the ground up as 3D time-of-flight LiDAR to meet mass commercial deployment and manufacturing requirements. They are suited for a variety of markets throughout the transportation sector, though Quanergy's current focus is automotive. It's believed that solid-state sensors would be more reliable and cost-effective than similar, mechanical options.

Quanergy has partnerships with Mercedes-Benz, Hyundai-Kia, Renault-Nissan, and others in the automotive industry. The LiDAR system in its entirety will be on display at the upcoming Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in January 2016.Sources: Connected Car Expo, Quanergy

2 comments
Mel Tisdale
You are in a car park late at night and it feels creepy. You get in your self-driving car and try and drive off, but cannot. Why? Someone you might be about to meet has put some chewing gum on this sensor. As a result your lovely autonomous item won't take you home because the sensor is registering as faulty on the 'pre-flight' check.
Let's hope the system is intelligent enough to lock all doors the moment the ignition is turned on.
It gets worse. You manage to take command of your car and drive home manually, where the fun starts the following morning when you discover that it wasn't chewing gum, but epoxy resin, which is now rock solid and stuck fast.
I imagine part of the design of this sensor will be ease of roadside replacement, which might make them vulnerable to theft. Oh hum!
Clyde
Does anyone know if they have a plan for mitigating interference from other vehicle's LIDAR systems?