Tiny Houses

Tiny A-frame cabin can be permanently stowed or hit the road

Tiny A-frame cabin can be perm...
The Bivvi Cabin's optional extras include a small deck area
The Bivvi Cabin's optional extras include a small deck area
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The Bivvi Cabin's optional extras include a small deck area
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The Bivvi Cabin's optional extras include a small deck area
The Bivvi Cabin's exterior is finished in metal to protect it from the elements
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The Bivvi Cabin's exterior is finished in metal to protect it from the elements
The Bivvi Cabin's interior can be finished in pine tongue and groove, douglas fir ply, or birch ply
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The Bivvi Cabin's interior can be finished in pine tongue and groove, douglas fir ply, or birch ply
The Bivvi Cabin's interior can be fitted with a double bed and a desk
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The Bivvi Cabin's interior can be fitted with a double bed and a desk
The ivvi
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The Bivvi Cabin's interior is very simple and consists of just one room with a large window and door
The Bivvi Cabin can be installed on a road-legal trailer or on permanent foundations
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The Bivvi Cabin can be installed on a road-legal trailer or on permanent foundations
The Bivvi Cabin measures 11.6 x 8.6 ft (3.5 x 2.6 m) and is 10.6 ft (3.2 m) at its highest point
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The Bivvi Cabin measures 11.6 x 8.6 ft (3.5 x 2.6 m) and is 10.6 ft (3.2 m) at its highest point
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The Bivvi Cabin, by Portland, Oregon-based Bivvi Camp, is a simple A-frame micro-cabin that starts at US$19,880. Like most of the similar projects we've covered, it comes with lots of options, including a solar power setup, though this one stands out from the crowd with the flexibility to be either installed permanently on foundations or towed around on a trailer like a tiny house.

The Bivvi Cabin measures 11.6 x 8.6 ft (3.5 x 2.6 m) and reaches 10.6 ft (3.2 m) at its highest point. Its wooden exterior is covered in hardwearing metal and the interior is finished in pine tongue and groove, Douglas fir ply, or birch ply.

The interior layout is as simple as you'd expect: there's a single room inside with a window and the cabin can be fitted with an optional single or double bed, plus an optional desk. A small outside deck area is also available. Unless you're some kind of hardcore downsizing enthusiast, you're not going to be wanting to live in this thing full time and it seems best suited as a weekender or maybe a guest cabin, given the lack of toilet, bathroom, running water or cooking facilities.

Other options include an on or off-grid power setup. The former consists of a standard RV-style electrical hookup, with interior lighting and some power outlets. The latter has a 100-W solar panel array, power outlets, USB ports, and LED lighting, plus a lithium battery.

The Bivvi Cabin can be installed on a road-legal trailer or on permanent foundations
The Bivvi Cabin can be installed on a road-legal trailer or on permanent foundations

We've no word about what kind of insulation it has, though Bivvi Camp says it's good enough for year-round use and will stand up to the elements.

"The exterior of each cabin is outfitted with visually striking and long-lasting materials to endure through every season and across a range of climates," says Bivvi Camp. "Pine boards line the interior volume of the cabin to offer a warm, inviting experience. Opposite the entry door, a large triangular picture window frames your view to the outdoors. Every cabin is fully insulated and has a natural ventilation system for airflow, keeping you comfortable in any season."

The Bivvi Cabin is prefabricated in a factory and delivered assembled after a build time of up to 12 weeks, though can also be sent as a flatpack if preferred. It's available throughout the US.

Source: Bivvi Camp

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3 comments
3 comments
Doodah
I like the concept but for something so basic that is maybe one level higher than building a simple shed, feels a bit expensive. I don't know what material cost is right now and I assume that those are quite high right now, but for 5k and some friends it wouldn't take much more than a day to build one of these.
Username
Everything as the "flexibility" of being put on a trailer.
Signguy
A tent is easier.