Robotics

University of Tehran unveils Surena III humanoid robot

University of Tehran unveils S...
Surena III at left, with a couple of "her" predecessors
Surena III at left, with a couple of "her" predecessors
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Designed as a robotics research platform, Surena III was created by a team at the university's Center of Advanced Systems and Technologies (CAST), led by Prof. Aghil Yousefi-Koma
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Designed as a robotics research platform, Surena III was created by a team at the university's Center of Advanced Systems and Technologies (CAST), led by Prof. Aghil Yousefi-Koma
Surena III at left, with a couple of "her" predecessors
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Surena III at left, with a couple of "her" predecessors

The likes of Asimo, Valkyrie and ATLAS better make some room, as there's a new humanoid robot on the block – and it looks not unlike the Gort bot from the original The Day the Earth Stood Still. It's the third version of the University of Tehran's Surena robot, and it was unveiled this Monday.

Designed as a robotics research platform, Surena III was created by a team at the university's Center of Advanced Systems and Technologies (CAST), led by Prof. Aghil Yousefi-Koma.

It stands 190 cm (6.2 ft) tall, weighs 98 kg (216 lb) and features four articulated limbs – it has six degrees of freedom in each leg, seven in each arm, one in each hand, one in the torso and two in the neck. These are driven by EC (electronically commutated) motors in the lower body, and by servomotor packages (which include motors, gearboxes and drivers) in the upper body.

These powered joints allow it to do things like walking along straight or curved paths, walking up and down slopes or stairs, adapting to uneven terrain, and grasping objects.

Designed as a robotics research platform, Surena III was created by a team at the university's Center of Advanced Systems and Technologies (CAST), led by Prof. Aghil Yousefi-Koma
Designed as a robotics research platform, Surena III was created by a team at the university's Center of Advanced Systems and Technologies (CAST), led by Prof. Aghil Yousefi-Koma

The robot is also able to interact with people thanks to its vision, voice recognition and (Persian-language) speech modules, running on custom software developed using the Robot Operating System. It can additionally monitor its onboard sensors, detect objects/faces, and imitate peoples' motions.

According to the university, Surena III has been in the works for almost four years, with 70 people from six different Iranian institutions involved in the project. The original Surena robot debuted in 2008.

Surena III can be seen in action, in the video below.

Source: University of Tehran via IEEE Spectrum

Iranian Humanoid Robot-Surena III-Introduction

2 comments
Robert Walther
klaatu barada nikto
Daishi
Congrats, this thing has been a work in progress since 2008 with 6 institutions, 70 people, and 4 years behind just this version alone and they made a robot that walks about as well as a $70 Robosapien. Full disclosure is I hate biped robots. I see it as sort of a Rube Goldberg experiment at mechanical mobility. So much R&D money has been thrown at bipeds chasing sci-fi fantasies of what robots are supposed to look like that at this point if it doesn't at least do something wheels couldn't do I don't think you should be allowed to define it as a success. The Segway was invented as a byproduct of Dean Kamen's iBOT stair climbing wheelchair. The Segway itself used to be expensive but now the parent company makes a $300 version (Ninebot mini). I'm willing to bet that also means the cost of using it as a robotics platform is also significantly cheaper. I think Double Robotics is already using a similar design that doesn't climb stairs. 6 wheel stair climbing hand trucks have been around for a while but I haven't seen many robots that leverage that method to be efficient and climb stairs. I think the industry would get more out of R&D in that area than they do out of the constant obsession with making million dollar bipeds that couldn't outperform a $10 radio controlled car.