Automotive

Ineos exploring hydrogen and electric versions of £48K Grenadier 4x4

Ineos exploring hydrogen and e...
Ineos will begin testing the hydrogen Grenadier in 2022
Ineos will begin testing the hydrogen Grenadier in 2022
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Ineos put the first Grenadiers up for reservation recently and plans an official launch in July 2022
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Ineos put the first Grenadiers up for reservation recently and plans an official launch in July 2022
Ineos Grenadier prototype off-road testing
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Ineos Grenadier prototype off-road testing
Ineos revealed the Grenadier interior several months ago
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Ineos revealed the Grenadier interior several months ago
Another look for the Grenadier interior
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Another look for the Grenadier interior
Along with the upcoming Grenadier fuel cell concept, Ineos' hydrogen advocacy campaign is set to include billboard and digital advertising, a UK hydrogen bus tour, and a hydrogen car display at the United Nations' COP26 climate change conference
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Along with the upcoming Grenadier fuel cell concept, Ineos' hydrogen advocacy campaign is set to include billboard and digital advertising, a UK hydrogen bus tour, and a hydrogen car display at the United Nations' COP26 climate change conference
Ineos' Grenadier hydrogen fuel cell test vehicle will use Hyundai technology
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Ineos' Grenadier hydrogen fuel cell test vehicle will use Hyundai technology
Ineos will begin testing the hydrogen Grenadier in 2022
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Ineos will begin testing the hydrogen Grenadier in 2022
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British petrochemical giant-cum-4x4 builder Ineos is pushing hydrogen as a leading solution for the UK's green energy revolution. Its work will include experimenting with a Grenadier 4x4 powered by a Hyundai fuel cell system. Ineos will look to offer the driving range necessary to explore the types of distant spaces the old-school Land Rover Defender redux was born to reach, while simultaneously protecting those pristine areas by leaving behind water vapor instead of greenhouse gases.

Ahead of the United Nations' COP26 climate change conference that starts at the end of the month in Glasgow, Ineos launched an advocacy campaign this week to shine light on hydrogen as a critical power source for lowering the UK's greenhouse gas emissions. The campaign is in part aimed at urging the government to invest in hydrogen infrastructure.

Ineos defines itself as Europe's leading operator of electrolysis, a method for cleanly producing low-carbon hydrogen from water. It already produces and uses 400,000 tonnes (440,925 US tons) of green hydrogen annually, and plans to invest a further £2 billion in new hydrogen production across Europe.

The company's campaign focuses on various uses for hydrogen, including power generation, industrial usage and transportation. It intends to put its money where its mouth is for that last use, exploring hydrogen fuel cells as a potential drive source for future variants of its forthcoming Grenadier 4x4, a jeep-like utility vehicle conceived as a rugged, no-nonsense replacement for the original Land Rover Defender.

Along with the upcoming Grenadier fuel cell concept, Ineos' hydrogen advocacy campaign is set to include billboard and digital advertising, a UK hydrogen bus tour, and a hydrogen car display at the United Nations' COP26 climate change conference
Along with the upcoming Grenadier fuel cell concept, Ineos' hydrogen advocacy campaign is set to include billboard and digital advertising, a UK hydrogen bus tour, and a hydrogen car display at the United Nations' COP26 climate change conference

"Electric cars are ideal for city centers and short journeys," opines Ineos founder and chairman Sir Jim Ratcliffe. "But hydrogen is much better for longer journeys and heavier loads, and that requires immediate investment in hydrogen distribution and hydrogen filling stations."

Heavy loads and long journeys through places without much refuelling or recharging infrastructure are what the Grenadier is all about, and Ineos signed a hydrogen partnership agreement with Hyundai in November 2020. It plans to begin testing a Hyundai hydrogen fuel cell-equipped Grenadier by the end of 2022.

Though Ineos shows a clear bias for hydrogen, it does plan to at least benchmark the fuel-cell Grenadier against an all-electric version. "We will have a hydrogen Ineos Grenadier on test next year (alongside an electric version)," Ratcliffe states in this week's announcement.

If you're thinking a hydrogen fuel cell system might ruin the inexpensive nature of the "stripped-back, utilitarian, hard-working 4x4" Ineos continues to advertise, there's no need to worry. Ineos forfeited any claims of utilitarian affordability three weeks ago when it priced the most basic, two-seat commercial model at £48,000 (about US$66,374) with VAT, somehow making the Grenadier more expensive than the 2023 Land Rover Defender for which it was conceived as a cheaper, simpler, more historically accurate alternative.

Ineos put the first Grenadiers up for reservation recently and plans an official launch in July 2022
Ineos put the first Grenadiers up for reservation recently and plans an official launch in July 2022

The base Grenadier does have two extra doors (though not seats) compared to Land Rover's base commercial 2023 Defender – the £45,675 (with VAT) Hard Top 90 – so you could say Ineos did undercut the £53,745 Defender Hard Top 110, but not by the type of money expected. Perhaps another global corporate spinoff can step in to build the inexpensive, stripped-back, rugged Defender-shaped "working tool" that the Ineos Grenadier was initially supposed to be.

Ineos plans to partner up to create a global network of up to 200 sales and service points, 23 of which are planned to to support the July 22 UK launch. It's also partnered with Germany's Robert Bosch GmbH to provide access to 10,000 Bosch Car Service centers worldwide. Reservations are available now in the UK, with pricing information for other markets yet to be announced.

Source: Ineos

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6 comments
6 comments
christopher
ROFL - not even a week since the solar-only camper crossed Europe. Pop quiz - which would you select: free-always, everywhere, solar and electricity - or - expensive can't-get-it-anywhere hydrogen to power your offroad vehicle ?
Aermaco
It is Good News to see the future unfolding and H2 will be even more important in aircraft range.
Oirinth
Hydrogen is just a storage medium, its only green if the the electricity you're creating it is green (solar/wind/Hydro). If you're creating it from fossil fuels its worse than just burning the fossil fuels directly as there is always going to be conversion losses. You can guarantee some idiot will have the bright idea to make hydrogen fuels by plugging into a coal burning power station and try to market it as a "green" fuel.

Ineos produced 400,000 tonnes annually .. that's goods .. But, the UK used 1.19 million barrels of fuel per day in 2020 ( 59 millions metric tons per year ) and UK also used 68.4 million metric tons of natural gas in 2020. That's a big difference in supply vs theoretical demand.

Also you need water to use for the electrolyzing .. this old article
https://cleantechnica.com/2017/06/13/fill-hydrogen-car-home-bond-villain/
states you only get 111g hydrogen per 1 litre of water .. doesn't sound like Hydrogen is a scalable solution for anywhere that has ever experienced a drought

martinwinlow
This is complete insanity. Aside from the huge amount of (100% pure) water needed to make 'green' H2, by the time you have made it and converted it back into electricity again in a fuel cell, you are left with less than 30% of the original electrical energy.
Sir Jim Ratcliffe is simply *wrong* when he says "hydrogen is much better for longer journeys and heavier loads" (than EVs). It is not better at all than pure electric drive as Tesla will tell you (and have already thoroughly proven as far as range is concerned) and the H2 refuelling infrastructure will cost hundreds of billions whereas the electricity infrastructure for EVs is already 95% in place.
TomLeeM
I think hydrogen is the future. I have read of ways to produce hydrogen that isn't expensive.
Aermaco
Batteries are also a storage medium but with a much less extendable range than H2 which if also used in backing them up extends that BEV's distance.
The future of civilization will obviously be a combination of all available energy sources that are economical with the subsidies that all sources historically have grown with.
The environment will not suffer offshore wind, solar, hydro, tidal, nuclear etc all creating hydrogen when generating more than demand and using it to its best advantage without any FF.