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Philips aims for mobile movie lovers with new PicoPix projector models

Philips aims for mobile movie ...
The PicoPix Max One DLP projector can throw 120-inch Full HD images in 16:9 or 4:3 aspects
The PicoPix Max One DLP projector can throw 120-inch Full HD images in 16:9 or 4:3 aspects
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The PicoPix Micro 2 comes with HDMI and USB-C connectivity, and its internal battery should be good for up to three hours of use between charges
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The PicoPix Micro 2 comes with HDMI and USB-C connectivity, and its internal battery should be good for up to three hours of use between charges
The PicoPix Micro 2 model can throw 80-inch projections at 480p resolution
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The PicoPix Micro 2 model can throw 80-inch projections at 480p resolution
The PicoPix Max One has a five-hour battery life and features touch-enabled control buttons to the rear
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The PicoPix Max One has a five-hour battery life and features touch-enabled control buttons to the rear
The PicoPix Max One DLP projector can throw 120-inch Full HD images in 16:9 or 4:3 aspects
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The PicoPix Max One DLP projector can throw 120-inch Full HD images in 16:9 or 4:3 aspects
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Last year, Philips Projection took to Indiegogo to open a conversation with potential buyers on the development of a compact projector named the PicoPix Max. Now the company is adding two more models to the lineup.

Philips says that the new additions benefit from a freshly reworked user interface, the implementation of a special algorithm sees fan noise reduced by 20 percent and speed optimized, and cinema professionals and acoustic engineers have fine-tuned the image and sound.

The smallest and lightest of the new PicoPix models is the 5.42 x 4.35 x 2-in (138 x 110.5 x 51-mm), 1.32-lb (600-g) Micro 2. It features DLP display technology with an OSRAM LED light source reported to last for more than 20,000 hours, and can throw up to 80 diagonal inches at 16:9 aspect from 60 inches (200 cm) away from the wall, though offers a 854 x 480-pixel image resolution and 600:1 contrast ratio only. So it's not going to complete with the latest laser projectors from Epson, Samsung or Sony, but such mighty models certainly can't be considered even relatively pocket-friendly, and they cost a whole lot more than this PicoPix model.

The PicoPix Micro 2 model can throw 80-inch projections at 480p resolution
The PicoPix Micro 2 model can throw 80-inch projections at 480p resolution

Elsewhere, the 12,000-mAh battery should be good for up to three hours of per charge use, there are two 3-W speakers with integrated digital sound processing, you'll need to adjust focus manually but there is auto keystone correction, and connectivity shapes up as USB-C for video, HDMI with CEC and ARC, and an audio output jack. This model goes on sale this month for US$299.

The PicoPix Max One is a bit chunkier than the Micro 2, but is also much more capable. The resolution on this 5.29 x 5.35 x 1.85-in (134 x 136 x 47-mm), 1.87-lb (850-g) DLP model is Full HD, like its big brother, and it benefits from four-channel RGB LED light source rated for over 30,000 hours. It can throw up to 120 diagonal inches at 16:9 or 4:3 aspects, from 126 inches (305 cm) away from a wall, rocks a 10,000:1 contrast ratio, and supports Rec.709 and HDR10 color.

The PicoPix Max One has a five-hour battery life and features touch-enabled control buttons to the rear
The PicoPix Max One has a five-hour battery life and features touch-enabled control buttons to the rear

It boasts electric focus, digital zoom, auto keystone and four-corner correction, runs on a Linux operating system, has touch control keys around back, comes with 4-W internal speakers, and its 16.500-mAh battery should last for five hours between charges.

The USB-C port can deliver video, data and audio, and there's HDMI with CEC and ARC, plus an audio output jack too. The Max One also goes on sale this month for $529.

Source: Philips

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2 comments
WB
noise reduced by 20% is such a lame statement. ARe we talking Decibel... but each Decibel is 10x more energy/noise than the previous one.. so 20% less.. are we talking two tenth of a decibel.. because that's what it would be.. or are we talking 20% less Decibel, but that would be several orders of magnitude less... anyway when companies make statements like that it really just means that their marketing department doesnt know what it's talking about, without saying what is 100%.
Aross
There is talk about battery size and run time but nothing about how and how long it will take to recharge.