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Ultra Short Throw Laser TV can fill your wall with 200-inch, 4K movies

Ultra Short Throw Laser TV can...
The Polaris Laser TV ultra-short-throw projector has a throw ratio of 0.25:1, and can throw 200-inch content up on a white wall from just 31 inches away
The Polaris Laser TV ultra-short-throw projector has a throw ratio of 0.25:1, and can throw 200-inch content up on a white wall from just 31 inches away
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The Polaris Laser TV ultra-short-throw projector has a throw ratio of 0.25:1, and can throw 200-inch content up on a white wall from just 31 inches away
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The Polaris Laser TV ultra-short-throw projector has a throw ratio of 0.25:1, and can throw 200-inch content up on a white wall from just 31 inches away
Though the graphic shows the Polaris throwing 80 to 150-inch projections, Bomaker says that it can throw all the way up to 200 inches
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Though the graphic shows the Polaris throwing 80 to 150-inch projections, Bomaker says that it can throw all the way up to 200 inches
The Polaris Laser TV includes a soundbar with Dolby and DTS audio
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The Polaris Laser TV includes a soundbar with Dolby and DTS audio
The Polaris offers a throw resolution of 3,840 x 2,160, and supports 107 percent of the BT.2020 and 151 percent of the DCI-P3 color gamuts, as well as HDR10
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The Polaris offers a throw resolution of 3,840 x 2,160, and supports 107 percent of the BT.2020 and 151 percent of the DCI-P3 color gamuts, as well as HDR10
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The audio visual arm of tech company Substanbo Inc has hit Indiegogo with a 4K UST laser projector that's gunning for your living-room TV. The Polaris is reported capable of throwing up to 200 inches and includes a Dolby Audio sound system.

The 4K (3,840 x 2,160) throw resolution and 0.25:1 throw ratio combination means that you get a 200-diagonal-inch throw from 31 inches away from the wall, or 100-inches for 10-inches away.

The Bomaker Polaris Laser TV's tri-color laser blends individually calibrated red, green and blue light sources for 107 percent of the BT.2020 color space and 151 percent of the DCI-P3 gamut. The projector outputs 2,500 peak ANSI lumens, so should be good for viewing without dimming ambient lighting or closing the blinds, and the system also supports HDR10 for deeper blacks and brighter whites.

Motion compensation technology makes for sharper moving images, onboard sensors detect when someone is approaching and auto dims the light source, and users can expect to get up to 30,000 hours of use from the light source before it needs replacing.

The Polaris offers a throw resolution of 3,840 x 2,160, and supports 107 percent of the BT.2020 and 151 percent of the DCI-P3 color gamuts, as well as HDR10
The Polaris offers a throw resolution of 3,840 x 2,160, and supports 107 percent of the BT.2020 and 151 percent of the DCI-P3 color gamuts, as well as HDR10

The system has MSD 6A-838 1.7-GHz processing brains supported by 3 GB of RAM and 32 GB of solid-state internal storage, there's a built-in soundbar with Dolby and DTS audio codecs. And when the projector is not throwing up visuals, the system can be wirelessly connected to a music source to serve as a Bluetooth speaker.

There are S/PDIF and RCA connections too, along with USB 2.0 and HDMI 2.0. Wi-Fi has also been cooked in, photos, videos and other content can be thrown up on the wall from a smartphone thanks to included Miracast wireless mirroring, and there's an Ethernet input too. The company says that viewers won't be bothered by annoying fans while watching movies, as the system fans are said to whisper out just 25 dB.

The Polaris has the look of an Optoma P1, but from the specs will be a better performer than that model and Samsung's much pricier Premiere UST laser projector. To snag one of these projectors, you'll need to pledge at least US$1,999 over on the Indiegogo campaign page, which is a saving of over 30 percent on the expected retail price. If all goes to plan, shipping is estimated to start in December. The video below has more.

Polaris 4K Ultra Short Throw Laser TV by Bomaker

Source: Bomaker

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5 comments
Madlyb
Current projector is 3500 lumens and to truly appreciate the color depth and resolution the room has to be quite dark, so is there something different about laser lighting sources that makes 2500 perform well?
robertswww
@Madlyb I think what they are saying is that traditional projectors have a single white light source that is then sent trough RGB filers to generate colors and the filters cut-down on the image brightness. On the other hand, the Polaris 4K uses 3 lasers, one for each primary color (RGB) and they call it Tri-Color Technology. The colored lasers do not need to be filtered, so they can generate a brighter, more saturated image. Check out their youtube video at the 33-second mark: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=judu4lsmoFU&feature=emb_logo
Signguy
The projector outputs 2,500 peak ANSI lumens, so should be good for viewing without dimming ambient lighting or closing the blinds, and the system also supports HDR10 for deeper blacks and brighter whites.
Eddy
Looks the goods but have reservations over brightness, I think more like 10000 lumens would be needed for a vivid 200 inch picture. Also the people who would be interested in upgrading to this would almost certainly be using a big panel flat screen and given they have lashed out big money already they are hardly likely to be listening to it on the built in squarkbox speakers but have a home hi-fi 5.1 or better for their DVD's as well so will not want to pay again for another Dolby built in sound system.
someone
A lot of marketing talk but many details missing:
~200W and only 25dB - other manufacturers can't get even close to this
2500ANSI lumens that is way to low to use during the day at 100inch without proper blackout blinds
No info on lag plus the fact that noone does a full 4k DMD (only that pixel shift stuff) means you are unlikely to enjoy gaming
Motion smoothing - first thing to turn off when you get any display from the shop nowadays
I don't know why people even bother putting speakers in to those things. Any soundbar with a separate sub would be better no to mention a proper reciewer

In general home cinema market is a big mess. Manufacturers like LG come up with new lines of products every 6 or so months, bugs never get fixed, features never get added.
Buy tech that you will be happy as it is right now and not for a promise that something will be there in the future.
And remember on indiegogo you are not buying a product. You are helping to develop something and someone claims you will get one.. some day.