Automotive

Semi-terrifying Rimac Nevera resets benchmarks for electric hypercars

Semi-terrifying Rimac Nevera r...
The Nevera can accelerate to 62 mph in under two seconds and hit a top speed of 258 mph
The Nevera can accelerate to 62 mph in under two seconds and hit a top speed of 258 mph
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After three years of refinement, development and testing, the C_Two becomes the production-ready Rimac Nevera
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After three years of refinement, development and testing, the C_Two becomes the production-ready Rimac Nevera
Rimac gives the Nevera cockpit an interesting mix of digital and physical control
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Rimac gives the Nevera cockpit an interesting mix of digital and physical control
Rimac Nevera design sketch
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Rimac Nevera design sketch
A peek into the cockpit through the open butterfly door
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A peek into the cockpit through the open butterfly door
Rimac will produce 150 Neveras
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Rimac will produce 150 Neveras
The Rimac Nevera debuts as one of the fastest cars in the world, electric or not
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The Rimac Nevera debuts as one of the fastest cars in the world, electric or not
Rimac names its second hypercar after lightning-charged Mediterranean storms
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Rimac names its second hypercar after lightning-charged Mediterranean storms
The Nevera is not quite as scary as being stranded in the middle of a thunderstorm, but it's certainly an intimidating force
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The Nevera is not quite as scary as being stranded in the middle of a thunderstorm, but it's certainly an intimidating force
The forged alloy wheels are shaped to deliver cooling air to the Brembo brakes
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The forged alloy wheels are shaped to deliver cooling air to the Brembo brakes
Rimac reveals the 1,914-hp Nevera
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Rimac reveals the 1,914-hp Nevera
The driver has much control over the ride of the Nevera, starting with seven selectable driving modes
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The driver has much control over the ride of the Nevera, starting with seven selectable driving modes
The Nevera can accelerate to 62 mph in under two seconds and hit a top speed of 258 mph
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The Nevera can accelerate to 62 mph in under two seconds and hit a top speed of 258 mph
Rimac says the Nevera has a 48/52 front/rear weight split
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Rimac says the Nevera has a 48/52 front/rear weight split
The Nevera's active aero kit includes the rear wing and diffuser
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The Nevera's active aero kit includes the rear wing and diffuser
First previewed at the 2018 Geneva Motor Show, the Rimac Nevera is ready for production
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First previewed at the 2018 Geneva Motor Show, the Rimac Nevera is ready for production
Rimac Nevera
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Rimac Nevera
The Nevera's carbon fiber monocoque incorporates the structural battery pack and bonded carbon roof
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The Nevera's carbon fiber monocoque incorporates the structural battery pack and bonded carbon roof
The Never is powered by four Rimac-developed electric motors
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The Never is powered by four Rimac-developed electric motors
The H-shaped 120-kWh liquid-cooled lithium/manganese/nickel battery
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The H-shaped 120-kWh liquid-cooled lithium/manganese/nickel battery
Below the skin
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Below the skin
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Rimac is leaving behind the "C_Two" pre-production moniker and charging forward with the production-ready Nevera, a next-level electric hypercar that makes us ask, do we really want to go that fast? Rimac's latest battery-wired endeavor rockets drivers from 0 to 60 mph in a bowel-loosening 1.85 seconds before flirting with world-record levels of pure, unfiltered speed. The high-tech wonder-car with seven-figure price tag also comes stuffed bumper to bumper with the latest tech, including AI-powered driver-performance assistance, steer-by-wire and second-gen torque vectoring.

Rimac has finally ditched the eyesore Concept_One/Two naming structure for a model name that befits a €2-million electric hypercar. The company explains that "Nevera" comes from the thunderous, high-voltage world of meteorology, a colloquialism that references a sudden and unexpected Mediterranean storm ripping across the Adriatic Sea off the Croatian coast. It's not hard to see how that name fits like a glove around a bleeding-edge megacar built to rip across asphalt in a way human drivers may or may not be prepared for.

Rimac names its second hypercar after lightning-charged Mediterranean storms
Rimac names its second hypercar after lightning-charged Mediterranean storms

"This is it. This is the car I had in mind when I embarked on the ‘impossible’ journey 10 years ago," Rimac founder and CEO Mate Rimac proclaims. "When we first revealed the C_Two, we set our targets extremely high. There was nothing else that could even come close to matching the car’s cutting-edge electric powertrain and extreme performance. But for us, that was only the starting point."

Many of the headline-grabbing specs carry over from the 2018 C_Two concept car, starting with the 1,914 horsepower developed by way of four bespoke permanent-magnet motors hung toward the corners of the carbon fiber monocoque. According to Rimac, the production powertrain can run at high power for longer periods of time than the original C_Two drive owing to improvements in battery cooling. The 1,741 lb-ft (2,360 Nm) that pens in next to the horsepower figure is a little higher than the original 1,696 lb-ft (2,299 Nm) estimate that came out of the 2018 Geneva Motor Show.

No question such a quad-motor powertrain will deliver world record-grade specs, and the Nevera starts its record push right out of the gate with a 1.85-second 0-60 mph (96.5 km/h) sprint, followed in short order by a 1.97-second 0-62 mph (100 km/h), 4.3-second 0-100 mph (161 km/h) and 9.3-second 0-186 mph (300 km/h). That last figure represents 2.5 seconds off Rimac's initial target.

Rimac says the Nevera has a 48/52 front/rear weight split
Rimac says the Nevera has a 48/52 front/rear weight split

As for the quarter-mile, the Nevera boasts a scorching 8.6-second estimate that could put it at the very top of the production car world record list. And unlike the many electric cars that see their lightning-quick acceleration fade into modest overall speed, the Nevera keeps its speedometer twitching all the way up to 258 mph (415 km/h), higher than any previous electric car and inching eerily close to the world's fastest ICE production hypercars.

Discerning Nevera buyers won't be dropping millions of dollars to merely stomp the accelerator over and over and clock acceleration sprints, so Rimac throws in a pile of tech to help them throw the Nevera around twisting racetrack and undulating coastal road. That effort starts with the Rimac All-Wheel Torque Vectoring 2 (R-AWTV 2) system, which replaces traditional electronic stability and traction control and calibrates torque to each individual wheel to optimize stability and handling throughout the vast range of conditions and objectives the car will find itself subjected to. Drivers select from seven different modes to fine-tune torque distribution, with sport, drift, range, comfort and track serving as the primary modes augmented by two customizable modes.

"Depending on the driving mode selected, the R-AWTV 2 technology can enable the Nevera to be drifted sideways or provide optimum levels of all-wheel-drive grip, traction and safety – no matter how challenging the road and weather conditions," explains Rimac test/development driver Miroslav Zrnčević.

First previewed at the 2018 Geneva Motor Show, the Rimac Nevera is ready for production
First previewed at the 2018 Geneva Motor Show, the Rimac Nevera is ready for production

After previewing the C_Two, Rimac put serious resources toward refining the aerodynamics package, starting with modifications to the bodywork, diffusers and intakes that result in a 34 percent improvement in aero efficiency as compared to the early C_Two prototypes. Algorithm-driven active aero elements like the rear wing, rear diffuser, front hood profile and underbody flap further optimize the aero profile to the current driving conditions.

Underneath that active bodywork, the double-wishbone suspension system does its part to boost the Nevera's handling via electronically controlled dampers and ride height adjustment. The car also uses an adaptable steer-by-wire system.

The Nevera's active aero kit includes the rear wing and diffuser
The Nevera's active aero kit includes the rear wing and diffuser

When it comes time to put the stop on the Nevera's electric fury, the electro-hydraulic braking system intelligently splits duties between the Brembo carbon-ceramic discs and regenerative motor braking. When the battery is running close to its thermal limits, the system emphasizes disc braking, whereas when the discs are running hot, it relies more on regenerative stopping power.

The Nevera is very clearly a driver's car, so instead of devoting artificial intelligence solely toward pulling the driver away from the wheel, Rimac puts it to work in more fully engaging the driver. The AI-driven Driver Coach provides performance analysis and instruction on track laps, running input from the car's 12 ultrasonic sensors, 13 cameras and six radars through the NVIDIA Pegasus operating system to provide audible and visual feedback and guidance. The Nevera has been prepped for the addition of the Driver Coach feature, which will roll out in 2022 via over-the-air updates.

A peek into the cockpit through the open butterfly door
A peek into the cockpit through the open butterfly door

Inside, the Nevera seats two with room for luggage. The driver sits behind a digital instrument cluster that they can tailor to show as much or as little information as preferred, some of which bleeds over to the other half of the cabin via a thin passenger screen. Vehicle control gets split neatly amongst digital and physical with a combination of central touchscreen and billet aluminum switches and dials.

Beyond its gaudy acceleration and speed numbers, the Nevera is also perfectly comfortable on lazier jaunts, traveling up to 340 miles (550 km, WLTP) between charges. Lunch breaks don't have to be any longer than necessary, either, as the car's 500-kW charging capability brings the 120-kWh carbon monocoque-integrated battery from 0 to 80 percent charged in as little as 19 minutes.

Rimac reveals the 1,914-hp Nevera
Rimac reveals the 1,914-hp Nevera

Rimac will build just 150 Nevera models, each starting at an even €2 million (approx. US$2.45 million). It promises that no two cars will be alike thanks to an intensive personalization program through which each buyer will be invited to Croatia to hand-select build options. The Nevera has been globally homologated and will be sold through Rimac's 19-partner dealer network with locations in Europe, North America, Latin America, Asia and the Middle East.

Source: Rimac

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10 comments
10 comments
guzmanchinky
Amazing but kind of a joke. The Roadster can do almost the same speeds (or better?) and drives itself for $250k. That's a car I can aspire to. This is just a dorm room poster...
Arth
Nevera?! really? 😆 .. that means ‘Fridge’ for hundreds of millions of spanish speaking people.. That’s one of the slowest things i know 😆.. they should do better marketing research
BlueOak
“rockets drivers from 0 to 60 mph in a bowel-loosening 1.85 seconds”

Haha not sure about the car, but gotta love that New Atlas is willing to publish lines like that.
sally
Yeah so Nevera is in some parallel world a better name than Concept 1 or 2. Sounds in English like a cross between Never and Vera hardly an appealing combination and if it’s true in Spanish it evokes ‘fridge’ then that’s truly a double whammy of awfulness. Let’s hope it doesn’t have equally bad connotations in Chinese or that’s most of the World alienated. The car when one can get over the moniker sounds amazing and looks pretty good in that colour though arguably won’t win any in class beauty contests I guess which in all honesty is a very high bar to compete with when in the Supercar category.
*Joe*
Wonder if it could make a fast lap around Nürburgring without running out of battery or overheating itself. Would be interesting to see how it compares. We know that Teslas can't even make a fast lap around a 4.1-mile course at VIR without having to shut down 😆.
WB
The Rimac Fridge costs 10x more than a Tesla Roadster and is the same speed. Or get the roaster with spacex package and it will outperform the Rimac in every way. 0-60 is rumored there to be 1s... and it freaking can hover with the spaceX boosters built in. I like how they had to go to two digits behind the comma to get past Tesla... meanwhile Tesla is one update away from blasting this car away even with the default roadster.

And about that peanut gallery comment of Tesla shutting down on a track that was half a decade ago. The new model 3's the S they run laps around gas cars (whose performance is also reduced by the way by more than Teslas are now).
Daishi
Ferrari spent a fortune in R&D to build the $1.5 million plug in hybrid LaFerrari and later took what they learned and built the $500k 1000 HP SF90 Stradale. I watched a video where they race a SF90 Stradale and a Rimac Nevera and the Nevera just destroys it. It was completely one sided and I doubt Ferrari feels any better about how badly they got beat knowing Nevera means fridge in Spanish. Sure it's expensive but a mostly unknown company out of Croatia still just bested the 1/4 mile time of every other production hypercar by a full second. The rest of the auto industry isn't going to just sit on their hands but this might be the last time in history the production 1/4 mile world record was held by an automobile with a combustion engine.
*Joe*
WB is drinking way too much of Elon's kool-aid claiming "it freaking can hover with the spaceX boosters built in". Please provide the official Tesla track record lap times and the data sources proving they run laps around gas cars at the track.
Jed Greco
2 things I like
#1.The battery is by far safer in the Rimac.
#2 When Tesla builds a car that comes close to the features for style, convenience, accessories, comfort and overall performance it too will be as expensive.
That's the game,make the fastest,safest,most luxurious ,performance car with state of the art tech,and then say now you do it better...It's just another way to compete like F1 racing,..while we sit back in awe,wishing to be able to afford that 20 yrs from now.lololol
Expanded Viewpoint
What the heck is it that causes so much mental disconnect (cognitive dissonance) when people think about electric cars? All of a sudden, they forget that these are basically Carbon based fuel cars, because that's mainly what makes the electricity that charges them up! And then, isn't the basic premise for having cars, trucks and motorcycles powered by "clean, efficient, Carbon neutral" electricity then thrown out the window, if they are hot rodded to use multiple times the power to get to these breathtaking acceleration rates and top speeds? Oh, I'm very sorry there, I forgot that all of that electricity is just conjured up out of thin air! And of course all of the exotic materials used for the batteries just grows on trees out in Nature, so there's no downside there either! Silly ol' me!!

Randy