Lock

  • If you haven't joined the Internet of Things (IoT) train yet, now's the perfect time to get on board. Smarts have been crammed into pretty much every household appliance, with more options than ever. New Atlas rounds up some of the best IoT gadgets to smarten up your home this holiday season.
  • ​We've seen video doorbells before, that let you see who's at your door via an app on your smartphone. We've also seen smart door locks, that let you digitally control who is allowed to enter your home. Gate Labs has now combined the two in one device, in the form of its Gate Smart Lock.
  • ​If you don't like lugging a bike lock around when cycling, then you might like Bisecu. It's permanently installed on the front wheel hub, and keeps that wheel from turning when the bike is left unattended. First announced this March, it is now the subject of a Kickstarter campaign.
  • Locking your outdoor gear up certainly helps keep it from getting stolen, but guess what – thieves may still go after it anyway! That's where goLock's Venture lock comes in. Unveiled at Interbike 2017, it notifies you and sounds an alarm if anyone messes with it.
  • Security startup August has returned with a new generation of connected door locks, which includes support for voice assistants like Alexa and Siri, along with a sensor that alerts you when you leave it unlocked.
  • ​We've seen a number of electronic bike locks lately, and we've also seen several GPS units that let you track the whereabouts of your two-wheeler if it gets stolen. The new Deeper lock, however, combines the two in one bicycle-mounted weatherproof device.
  • Drivers aren't the only road users susceptible to smartphone distractions. To keep cyclists focused on the road, Dutch telecom company KPM has teamed up with the Dutch Traffic Safety Association to develop a smart bike lock that disables the rider's phone while on the move.
  • The Ottolock bike lock recently raised a few eyebrows, as it looks like a zip-tie on steroids. Hiplok's Z Lok should raise a few more, as it looks like a regular zip-tie – but there's more to it than that.​
  • ​The BitLock and Skylock may look like traditional U-locks, but they unlock and lock as the user comes in and out of Bluetooth range. Users still have to lug them around, though. Some Korean entrepreneurs have come up with what they believe is a better idea, in the form of the wheel-mounted Bisecu.
  • ​It's safe to say that most people lock their bike up with it sitting in an upright position. Realizing this, the folks at Abus went and created a system called NutFix. Once it's installed, the only way of removing a bicycle's wheels and/or seat involves turning the whole bike on its side.
  • ​​Steel cable bike locks may be lighter than U-locks, but they're also notoriously easy to cut through. Chains are one alternative, although they're heavy. So, what's lighter than a chain, and more cut-resistant than cable? According to a group of German designers, their textile-based lock is.​
  • ​Unless you use lights that are semi-permanently attached to your bike, you generally have to bring them inside with you when leaving your bike parked. Don't want to bother? Well, that's where Lemurlock comes in. It combines a headlight and tail light with a steel cable lock.