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Locky aims to make dumb keys smart

Locky aims to make dumb keys s...
Locky reportedly works with 90 percent of existing keys
Locky reportedly works with 90 percent of existing keys
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Locky reportedly works with 90 percent of existing keys
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Locky reportedly works with 90 percent of existing keys
Once a key is installed in the spring-loaded Locky, it can subsequently be folded back inside the device when not in use, and deployed switchblade-style when needed
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Once a key is installed in the spring-loaded Locky, it can subsequently be folded back inside the device when not in use, and deployed switchblade-style when needed
A look at Locky's internal workings
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A look at Locky's internal workings
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We've been seeing quite a few "smart" door locks lately, that allow users to lock and unlock their door using a smartphone. Perhaps you don't want to replace your existing locks, though? Well, Locky offers some smart-lock features, but it's used to augment an existing old-school key.

Locky is basically an electronic fob, which is capable of clamping onto the base of a claimed 90 percent of regular door-lock keys. It's powered by a replaceable lithium coin cell battery, which should reportedly be good for up to 14 months of use.

Once the key is installed in the spring-loaded fob, it can subsequently be folded back inside the device when not in use, and deployed switchblade-style when needed. Flipping the key out also powers Locky up. An onboard 9-axis IMU (inertial measurement unit) then monitors how the device is being moved, detecting the telltale movements associated with turning the key in a lock.

Using Bluetooth, an integrated microprocessor transmits the IMU data to an iOS/Android app on the user's smartphone. Among other things, this allows them to later check if they remembered to lock their door upon leaving the house – that said, the app also uses the phone's GPS to determine if the user has left home without locking their door, and alerts them with a notification if they have.

Once a key is installed in the spring-loaded Locky, it can subsequently be folded back inside the device when not in use, and deployed switchblade-style when needed
Once a key is installed in the spring-loaded Locky, it can subsequently be folded back inside the device when not in use, and deployed switchblade-style when needed

If multiple smartphone-carrying family members are each using their own Locky-equipped key for access to one shared home, any one of those people can use the app to see a record of who has come and gone from the house, and at what times. This feature could allow still-at-work parents to confirm that their children have safely arrived home from school.

Additionally, if the user unthinkingly leaves their Locky/key in the lock upon getting home, an audible alarm built into the fob will sound when the distance between it and the phone exceeds a threshold distance. It's also possible to locate a misplaced key within the home, using the app to wirelessly trigger that alarm.

Should you be interested, Locky is currently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign. A pledge of US$39 will get you one – at half the planned retail price – when and if they reach production.

Source: Kickstarter

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1 comment
f8lee
Talk about a solution in search of a problem...this does what, exactly? I can put the house key in its own special fob, while keeping my other keys (car, office, locker etc.) on their own key ring? Convenient!
Oh, it'll whine if I leave the key in the door - faboo! Because that is such a hugely common problem. Or help me find my key - like a Tile?
As for ensuring the (latchkey) kids made it home - why not use the Simplisafe system and give each child their own code? And that would give one a house security system to boot.