UPDATED: May 15, 2017. This synopsis of the 100 most expensive cars ever sold at auction includes detailed images of all the cars, prices and links to the catalog descriptions ... a full snapshot of the marketplace for hyper-rare collectible cars.

All of these cars are not just rare but beautiful, and approach the intersection of art and automobiles. It's little wonder that McKeel Hagerty, founder of the world's largest classic car insurance company, recently referred to the Ferrari 335S Spider Scaglietti that sold for US$35.7 million in February 2016 as a "Mona Lisa Car".

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Now we're presuming Hagerty's "Mona Lisa" reference means a car that is extremely rare, exquisitely beautiful, has a fabled history and an impeccable provenance.

In most cases in this listing, all of those criteria are met, and like so many other high-priced collectibles, "storied objects." Wherever possible, we have pointed out to the full story to the best told tale we can find.

Ferrari dominates the top 100

Ferrari dominates the list with 62 of the top 100 cars, and 41 of the 250 GT series cars on the list. That is, 41 percent of the world's 100 most valuable cars are based on the Ferrari 250 GT platform.

Mercedes-Benz is the next most prominent marque with eight cars on the list ahead of Bugatti (7), Alfa Romeo (4), Ford (3), Jaguar (3), Bentley (2), Jaguar (2), Rolls-Royce (2) and Shelby (2). Aston Martin, Delahaye, Duesenberg, Porsche and Talbot-Lago each have one car in the top 100.

The single model with the most entries in the top 100 is the Ferrari 250 GT California Spider, with no less than 10 cars - a whopping 10 percent of automotive heaven.

Even the most recently produced car in the top 100 is a Ferrari, a 2005 Enzo, followed by two McLaren F1 cars. There will undoubtedly be more McLarens added to this list in the coming years as the McLaren F1's star is rising rapidly and as one of automotive history's landmark cars, it will appeal even more to new generations of collectors as it drives to perfection, and has all those modern conveniences which take the edge off bare bones performance motoring.

America dominates the marketplace

The annual Monterey Car Week Festival which surrounds the Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance is now clearly the epicentre of the collector car universe. 51 of the top 100 cars ever sold at auction have been sold during Monterey Car Week with January's Scottsdale auctions in Arizona the second most prominent single venue (10 cars) and American sales across all venues accounting for 74 of the top 100 cars.

Sales in other countries are apportioned 12 to the U.K., six to Italy, five to Monaco and three to France.

RM-Sotheby's sold more than half the cars in the top 100

RM-Sotheby's dominates the top 100, having sold more than half the cars on the list (51), followed by Gooding & Company (28), Bonhams (14), Artcurial (3), Mecum (2) with Christies and H&H
 having sold one each.

This listing is continually updated as we track the key auctions around the world.

The prices contained on this list have been standardised in American dollars (USD). If a car sold elsewhere, we've converted the GBP, EUR or FRF to USD on that day and rounded it to the nearest dollar.

Finally, this listing may be inaccurate in some regard. We've been tracking the marketplace for 15 years but no database is perfect, so if we've missed something, or got it wrong in some way, please use the moderated comments to alert us, and we'll check it out, and fix it post haste. Our aim is accuracy so that we can keep our valued readers well informed.

1 | 1962-63 Ferrari 250 GTO Berlinetta

US$38,115,000
The most expensive Italian car sold at auction
August, 2014
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Bonhams Auction Page

The first sale at auction of a Ferrari 250 GTO for many years created intense international interest at Pebble Beach in 2014, with the record almost certain to be broken well before bidding began. The rumor mill tends to report really big dollar sales in the dealer sector and in recent times it had been working overtime and the word on everyone's lips has been 250 GTO. In February 2012, a 1964 Ferrari 250 GTO changed hands privately to become the most expensive car ever sold with a price of US$32 million. Then, just a few months later, a 1962 GTO sold for US$35 million, and in late 2013 a 1963 GTO sold for US$52 million.

As mentioned, the sale of the GTO returned the automotive auction record to Ferrari on the 26th anniversary of the death of Enzo Ferrari). The full story can be found here.

2 | 1957 Ferrari 335S Spider

US$35,712,945 (sold for €32,075,200)
February, 2016
Paris, France
Official Artcurial Auction Page

Built in 1957, this Ferrari 335 S Spider Scaglietti was first driven by Peter Collins and Maurice Trintignant in the 1957 Sebring 12 Hours, then by Wolfgang von Trips in the Mille Miglia in May of that year, where it finished in second place. Mike Hawthorn (World F1 champ in 1958) drove the car in the 24 Heures du Mans, setting the first lap record in the history of the event of over 200 km/h (124 mph).

The car has many more prestigious races to its name including the Swedish Grand Prix and Venezuela Grand Prix in 1957, as well as the Cuba Grand Prix, which it won in the hands of racing legend Sir Stirling Moss in 1958. The full story can be found here.

3 | 1954 Mercedes-Benz W196 Silver Arrow

US$29,600,000 (sold for £19,601,500)
The most expensive German car ever sold at auction.
The most expensive Mercedes-Benz ever sold at auction.
July, 2013
West Sussex,United Kingdom
Official Bonhams Auction Page

One of the most famous cars in the world, driven by the world's most famous driver, which we've covered in great detail previously. Mercedes-Benz has a history of competing at the highest level of motorsport, trying out a host of new technologies, winning big, then retiring. The company returned to Grand Prix racing in 1954 with the stated intention of winning both the World F1 title and the World Sportscar championship, achieved everything it set out to do inside two years, then shut it all down.

Only fourteen W196R machines ever existed. Ten still exist, three are in museums and six remain inside Mercedes-Benz. That leaves this Silver Arrow W196R (chassis 006/54) as the only post-war Mercedes-Benz Silver Arrow in private hands. The very recent (2010 – 2016) F1 cars of Schumacher, Rosberg and Hamilton all remain inside Mercedes-Benz too. The Mercedes-Benz museum is a treasure trove in many senses.

This car is also a technological gem, having been built with futuristic thinking specifically to win world Formula One titles, the W196R won two inside 18 months with a final scorecard of 12 starts for nine wins. The engine is a 2½-liter straight-8 and the auction car was driven by Fangio who won both the 1954 German and Swiss Grand Prix races in it.

The W165R was such a showcase of technological firsts that it is a milestone vehicle in motorsport history, and a car that demonstrates significant thought leadership on many levels.

Desmodromic valve actuation (still used by Ducati 63 years later to compete at the very top of World Superbike racing), inboard brakes, independent suspension, the first first fuel-injected F1 motor, a lightweight space frame that weighed just 36 kg (73 lb), all wrapped in an aerodynamics package so far ahead of the game that it put the team in a different league.

This particular Silver Arrow was driven by the most respected race driver of all-time, Juan Manuel Fangio. Fangio won several Grand Prix races in this vehicle including famous back-to-back victories that sealed his 1954 Formula One driver's title.

For those who know the name but not the deeds, Fangio's racing years were largely stolen by WWII. When he drove his first F1 race, he was 38 years of age, yet he went on to win 24 Formula one races, five driver titles with four teams (Alfa Romeo, Ferrari, Mercedes-Benz and Maserati), and still easily retains the highest winning percentage of any driver in F1 history at 46 percent – 24 wins from 52 starts. The full story of both the car and the driver can be found in our in-depth write up when the Silver Arrow took the world record.

4 | 1956 Ferrari 290 MM

US$28,050,000
December, 2015
New York, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

In broad terms, the car is the one Enzo Ferrari promised to Juan Manuel Fangio in order to win his signature on a Ferrari contract: a 3.5 liter V12 with 320 horsepower, light weight and balanced roadholding. Ferrari's ultimate goal was to put the best driver in the best car and win the 1956 World Sportscar Championship. This car was one of several identical prototypes and it helped win titles for Ferrari in 1956 and 1957. In addition to being driven by Fangio in the Mille Miglia during 1956, this car was also subsequently raced by the full Ferrari roster plus a few other notables as time went by; Phil Hill, Ken Wharton, Olivier Gendebien, the Marquis Alfonso de Portago, Wolfgang von Trips, Peter Collins, Masten Gregory, Eugenio Castelloti and Luigi Musso. Full Story

5 | 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 S NART Spider

US$27,700,000
August, 2013
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

When North American Ferrari importer (and Le Mans 24 Hour winner) Luigi Chinetti said to his friend Eddie Smith, "I talked Enzo into building some spiders. Do you want one?", the story of this car began. Eddie bought one of the ten N.A.R.T. (North American Racing Team) Spiders that were built and the car remained in the family until this sale when it was generously donated to charity.

6 | 1964 Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale

US$26,400,000
August, 2014
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

Our preview of the auction of this 1964 Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale suggested it would become a top 10 car given it is just one of three cars ever produced. The hand-built 275 GTB/C incorporated lightweight aluminum bodywork and a Tipo 563 chassis. As a successor to Ferrari's 250 GTO, the Speciale ran a lightweight, 3.3 liter V12 that, with the help of six Weber carburettors, managed to produce 320 hp (238.6 kW). That impressive bit of power was put to the road via a 5-speed manual transaxle gearbox that worked in conjunction with a four-wheel independent suspension set up, and disc brakes on all corners.

7 | 1955 Jaguar D-Type

US$21,780,000
The most expensive British car ever sold at auction.
The most expensive Jaguar ever sold at auction.
August, 2014
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

This car was the first D-Type provided by the Jaguar factory to a private racing team, and was delivered to its Scottish owners, Ecurie Ecosse, on May 5, 1955. It didn't make the start of the world's most important race that year due to a crash in practice.

In 1956, the Ecurie Ecosse D-Type was up against some seriously stiff competition. On top of the factory-backed Jags, the Scottish D-Type would have to beat entries from Aston Martin and Ferrari. Early in the race, two of the factory-backed Jags were wiped from contention in an accident, and the third struggled with fuelling issues.

That left the door open for the privateer team of Ninian Sanderson and Ron Flockhart in this car to make history, and it crossed the line in first ahead of Stirling Moss and Peter Collins in an Aston Martin DB3S. That is, this car won Le Mans, and that kind of provenance is rare indeed. Our preview of the auction told the full story.

8 | 1939 Alfa Romeo 8C 2900B Lungo Spider by Touring

US$19,800,000
The most expensive pre-WW2 car ever sold at auction
August, 2016
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

The ultimate Italian sports car of its generation, this car is one of 12 extant Touring Spiders, the first "Immortal 2.9" to be offered at public auction this century and a Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance award-winner too.

9 | 1961 Ferrari 250 GT California Spider

US$18,465,733 (sold for €16,288,000)
February, 2015
Paris, France
Official Artcurial Auction Page

This particular vehicle was the crown jewel of the most miraculous barnfind in history. That's Artcurial's Matthieu Lamoure and Pierre Novikoff who came across the remarkable treasure trove of rare automobiles on a provincial farm in the West of France. Is it any wonder they're grinning - they just found a Ferrari California Spider in a barn. That's it behind them being used as a storage shelf for old magazines.

The California Spider was just one of many cars found that day including significant models from many of the legendary marques in automotive history: Bugatti, Hispano-Suiza, Talbot-Lago, Panhard-Levassor, Maserati, Ferrari, Delahaye, Delage. Along with the famous manufacturers, many of the bodies were built by the most celebrated coachbuilders of the period, such as Million & Guiet, Frua, Chapron and Saoutchik. No less than three Saoutchik-bodied Talbot Lago T26s were found among the sheds, including a very rare Grand Sport Aérodynamique and a Talbot Lago T26 Cabriolet once owned by King Farouk.

The Spider was purchased new by the actor Gérard Blain, then sold to fellow actor Alain Delon, who was photographed many times at the wheel of this machine, including in 1964 with Jane Fonda during the filming of Les Félins and on the Côte d'Azur with Shirley MacLaine.

Not surprisingly, cars of such ilk are fastidiously accounted for by countless automotive historians and the disappearance of this car in the seventies left it unaccounted for in the Ferrari Register and it was thought lost. Full story.

10 | 1954 Ferrari 375-Plus Spider Competizione

US$18,298,607 (sold for £10,753,500)
June, 2014
Goodwood, U.K.
Official Bonhams Auction Page

Bonhams described this car in the auction catalog as an "outstanding example of the biggest-engined, most powerful and most important sports-racing Ferrari model built purely for works team use at the outset of the 1954 International motor racing season."

One of the features of the "works" 1954 Ferrari 375-Plus Spider was its 4.9 litre V12 motor, which was known by the French racing community as "Le Monstre" and by the British as "The Fearsome Four-Nine." The car ran second in the 1954 Mille Miglia in the hands of Umberto Maglioli, won an international race at Silverstone in May with José Froilán González behind the wheel, then Maglioli and Paolo Marzotto used this car in the Le Mans 24 Hour race, swapping the lead with a sister car driven by González and Maurice Trintignant until a gearbox failure finished this car's race.

González and Trintignant won the race in an identical car and both cars shared the fastest lap. Paolo Marzotto, the driver who had passed the exquisitely talented González (dubbed the "The Pampas Bull" by the British press) for the lead at Le Mans, described this car as "terrifyingly fast" as it had enough torque to out-accelerate anything out of a corner, and enough horsepower to breeze past the aerodynamically superior D-Type Jaguars on the straights.

This particular car has a long and interesting history which is well documented on the Bonhams auction page. "The Fearsome Four-Nine" is perhaps best known as the winner of the final and fastest Carrera Panamericana in Mexico.

For those unfamiliar with the infamous Carrera Panamericana, it was a road race run on public roads in Mexico from 1950 to 1954. To picture the event, think of famous road races such as the Mille Miglia or Targa Florio on both steroids and acid. The race was twice as long as the Mille Miglia, and with no separation from the public.

The original Carrera Panamericana (it has now been revived in somewhat tamer and saner form) is arguably the fastest and most dangerous road race ever held on public roads, well beyond the African runnings of the Paris-Dakar, an event we previously labelled the world's most dangerous sporting event when it was still being run in Africa.

The 1950-54 Carrera Panamericana comprehensively trumps the Paris-Dakar as the world's most dangerous regularly staged motor race EVER! In five runnings of the Carrera Panamericana, 27 competitors were killed along with an unknown but substantial number of spectators and race officials. When the race began in 1950, average speed for the 3000+ kilometer course was 142 km/h (88 mph) but by the fifth running, average speeds (remember this was on public roads, indeed, a national highway, and organizer resources to separate the public from the racing were so thin that "collateral damage" was almost guaranteed) had climbed dramatically to an average speed of 173.7 km/h (107.96 mph).

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame British band Pink Floyd's Nick Mason and David Gilmour made a film documentary about the Carrera Panamericana race which can be seen in two parts – part 1 and part 2 – with seven previously unpublished tracks along with some music you will undoubtedly know. Factory teams from Ferrari, Mercedes-Benz, Porsche, Jaguar, Alfa Romeo, Lancia, Maserati, Gordini, Buick, Cadillac and Oldsmobile competed, and the world's best drivers (Juan Manuel Fangio, Alberto Ascari, Phil Hill, Dan Gurney, Ritchie Ginther, Piero Taruffi, Umberto Maglioli, Felice Bonetto, Louis Chiron, Herman Lang, Karl Ling and dozens of other well-known names) drove in the event, and it held world championship status in both 1953 and 1954.

11 | 1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione

US$18,150,000
August, 2016
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

One of nine alloy-bodied LWB California Spiders with covered headlights, disc brakes, and full competition specification. The car's race record includes fifth overall at the 1960 12 Hours of Sebring and it won a Platinum Award and the Competizione Cup at the 2011 Cavallino Classic.

12 | 1964 Ferrari 250 LM

US$17,600,000
August, 2016
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

Only 34 LMs were ever built, including the car that won the race it was built to win (the 24 Hours of Le Mans, hence the name), becoming the last Ferrari to do so. LMs rarely appear at auction, and those that do have made the top 10 global annual prices every time going back for two decades. This particular car had never had a major collision and retained all of its original mechanical components. Formerly part of the Matsuda Collection, Ferrari Classiche certified, and shown at the 1964 and 1966 Earls Court Motor Shows, this "weapons-grade Ferrari" now has another honor to it's name – the most expensive LM ever sold at auction, giving the model three entries in the top 20 most valuable cars ever sold.

13 | 1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spider

US$17,160,000
The most valuable movie car ever sold at auction
March, 2016
Amelia Island, Florida, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

One of the 37 SWB California Spiders with covered headlights and with just three owners from new, it had never before been offered at auction. It was delivered new to famous industrial designer Gianfranco Frattini, and appeared in the Academy Award-winning movie Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow starring Sophia Loren and Marcello Mastroianni.

14 | 1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spider

US$16,830,000
August, 2015
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

Sold by the colourful Lord Irvine Laidlaw, this particular car was in very original condition, and as the official description pointed out, "has not been the subject of a full restoration, nor has it made the rounds at various Concours' d'Elegance, offering its new owner the pride and pleasure of being the first to exhibit this car at the most exclusive international events."

In addition to Lord Laidlaw's not inconsiderable contribution to the provenance, it is believed to have been owned by Gunther Sachs, the prominent German playboy with family links to both Opel and Sachs. It's quite likely Gunther courted his second wife, Brigitte Bardot, in this car.

15 | 1962 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta Speciale by Bertone

US$16,500,000
August, 2015
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

We elected to use a composite image of this car because it is so very "speciale." There are no ugly cars that sell for more than a million dollars and in this category of $10 million plus automobiles, we're somewhere near the intersection of automobiles and art, with a riveting back story mandatory. This is a genuine one-of-a-kind 250 GT SWB Berlinetta Speciale designed by a collaboration between Nuncio Bertone and a 23–year–old Giorgetto Giugiaro and built by Nuncio's legendary house of Carrozzeria Bertone as his personal car.

Inspired by Ferrari's "shark-nose" 156 F1 world-championship-winning Grand Prix car, with recognizable elements of the 330 TRI LM and 246 SP sports racing cars, the signature feature of Giugiaro's design was its "shark-nose" front-end treatment.

A prime example of the coachbuilder's art, the Berlinetta Speciale was introduced at the 1962 Geneva Auto Show, then at the annual carrozzerie exhibition at the Biscaretti Museum in Torino where it was showcased alongside Pinin Farina's Superfast III, a Touring-bodied Maserati 3500 GT, and a Dual-Ghia L6.4. Auto Italiana.

A revised design was implemented by the time the car (3269 GT) was displayed as the centrepiece of the Bertone stand at the Torino Auto Show in November, 1962.

Despite all the accolades Nuccio's Berlinetta Speciale received during its tour of the motor show circuit, Enzo Ferrari never formally acknowledged the car that had so beautifully re-imagined his classic 250 GT SWB, Bertone was never engaged by Maranello and Ferrari production cars remained built or designed almost exclusively by Bertone's Torinese rival Pinin Farina.

This car was offered publicly for the first time in its history.

16 | 1957 Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa

US$16,390,000
August, 2013
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

A previous holder of the world auction record, this Ferrari Testa Rossa debuted at the 1957 Nurburgring 1000 kms but it is not the car's racing history which makes it so valuable, but the fact this is the very first Testa Rossa – the original prototype and rolling testbed for the 250 TR (Testa Rossa) line, one of the most successful sports racing cars ever.

Though Ferrari's Testa Rossa dominated sports car racing for the next half decade, only 34 were ever built, with this car's younger siblings winning the Le Mans 24 Hour race in 1958, 1960, and 1961.

"Testa Rossa" means "red head" in Italian, and thanks to the bright red rocker covers on THIS CAR (Chassis 0666 TR), that term became one of the most revered in automotive history.

Like many race cars that have seen action over a period, Ferrari 0666 TR is a little bit like Grandpa's axe (which had three heads and 12 handles during its lifetime), as it burned twice and was seriously bent out of shape during the 1958 Le Mans 24 Hour race. It is nonetheless the original Testa Rossa, and hence represents the beginning of a long and glorious history. The full story of Ferrari 0666 TR regales its provenance in granular detail.

17 | 1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spider

US$15,180,000
August, 2014
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

This Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spider features the highly attractive covered-headlight treatment, which Scaglietti applied to just 37 of the 56 examples built. It is also one of a limited number of SWB California Spiders that came factory-equipped with an optional hardtop. This car has been displayed at such world-renowned events as Concorso Italiano, Monterey Vintage Ferrari Concours and Cavallino Classic, as well as participating in important rallies such as the Colorado Grand and the Copperstate 1000

18 | 1964 Ferrari 250 LM

US$14,300,000
November, 2013
New York, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

One of several examples of Ferrari's first mid-engined car in the top 25 on this list, the Ferrari 250 LM was a derivative of the 250P (for prototype) and 275P mid-engined factory race cars which won the Le Mans 24 Hour race in 1963 and 1964 – a genuine racing car available to the public.

Only 32 of the 320 hp V-12 250 LMs were built, and one duly went on to validate its model designation by winning the 1965 Le Mans classic in North American Racing Team (NART) colours, driven by Masten Gregory, Ed Hugus and Jochen Rindt (who would win the World Formula One Champion in 1970, albeit posthumously).

The full history of this car, which included eighth overall and first in class at the 1968 24 Hours of Daytona, can be found on the official RM Auctions page.

19 | 1962 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato

US$14,300,000
December, 2015
New York, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

The Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato was introduced at the London Motor Show in October 1960, being a lightened 314 hp (234 kW) DB4 GT with Zagato styling. It was timed at 153.5 mph (247 km/h) making it the fastest production car ever produced to that time.

The publicity surrounding the car was however immense, because it was a derivation of the 1959 Aston Martin DB4 GT which already held the title of the world's fastest car, having been timed at 152 mph (245 km/h).

For detailed information see our extensive feature article: The fastest cars in history: from 1946 until now.

The GT had in turn in turn had taken the title from the car from which it was derived: in 1958 an Aston Martin DB4 had been timed at 141 mph (227 km/h). This Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato also had a successful period racing career, was restored by marque specialist Richard Williams and Carrozzeria Zagato and had been an award winner at numerous concours events on both sides of the Atlantic.

20 | 1998 McLaren F1 'LM-Specification'

US$13,750,000
August, 2015
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

The McLaren F1 is almost certainly destined for the same sort of superstardom as the Ferrari GTO on the auction block, being the most significant supercar of the modern era. The McLaren F1 is still the fastest, non-forced-induction car ever produced, a pioneering landmark in composite construction, drivability and racetrack success ad infinitum.

McLaren developed a racing version of the F1 road car to run in the FIA GT1 category in the 1995 season. Despite a design and development period of just 3 months, the F1 GTR swept all before it, winning not only the 1995 GT1 Championship, but also the 24 Heures du Mans on its debut, taking 1st, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 13th places. There were subsequently five Le Mans specification cars made, and this is one of them.

This particular car is exceptional because, although it was the second-last road-spec F1 built, it was one of just two cars upgraded by McLaren Special Operations with an LM-spec engine. This means it retains its luxury interior and all modern conveniences, including satnav and the Extra High Downforce Package plus a Le-Mans-winning engine.

21 | 1962 Shelby 260 Cobra

US$13,750,000
The most expensive American car ever sold at auction
August, 2016
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

This car is the very first Shelby Cobra (CSX2000) and never left the care of Carroll Shelby. It was sold at Monterey by the Carroll Hall Shelby Trust for charity. The story is well told by the official auction page - this is the car that spawned the legend.

22 | 1960 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Competizione

US$13,500,000
August, 2016
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

This car was was one of the first Competition SWB Berlinettas built, and was driven by Hugus and Pabst to seventh overall and fourth in the GT class at the 1960 24 Hours of Le Mans. It was also driven in testing by Phil Hill, Richie Ginther, and Wolfgang von Trips, so it has quite some history.

23 | 1956 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta 'Tour de France'

US$13,200,000
August, 2015
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

Only 77 of Ferrari's "Tour de France" models were ever built, and this car is one of the seven Scaglietti-bodied first-series competition Berlinettas inside that number. This isn't just any Tour de France model, though – this is the car that gave the model its name through winning the 1956 Tour de France Auto, an automotive equivalent to the famous bicycle race that predates it by four years and indeed, was France's equivalent to Italy's Mille Miglia or Sicily's Targa Florio.

It was also owned and raced by one of motorsport's larger-than-life figures, the Marquis Alfonso de Portago. Born to a long line of Spanish nobility, he was named for his godfather, Alfonso XIII, the last King of Spain.

High-testosterone males are a family tradition, and de Portago's father led a famously hedonistic existence, but it paled in comparison to the handsome, dashing, unspeakably wealthy, devil-may-care young Alfonso.

Alfonso was an accomplished equestrian (considered one of the world's leading steeplechasers in 1951-52), learned the sport of bobsledding in two weeks in order to lead the Spanish national team to the 1956 Winter Olympic Games where he steered the two-man bob to fourth place, taking the bronze medal in the world championships the following year. His sporting prowess was more than matched by his legendary womanizing. Though he married New York socialite Carroll McDaniel in 1948 at the age of 20, his courtships of Revlon spokesmodel and one of the first supermodels, Dorian Leigh (said to be an inspiration for Truman Capote's Holly Golightly character from Breakfast at Tiffany's) and actress Linda Christian (the first "Bond girl") were his most high-profile affairs, though the more you read of his exploits, the more rampant the philandering appears to have been.

De Portago began midget car racing in Paris in 1953 and a chance meeting and instant rapport with Scuderia Ferrari driver Luigi Chinetti at the Paris Salon de l'automobile in October 1953 considerably accelerated his participation in the sport. The famed North American Ferrari importer invited Alfonso to be his co-driver at the infamous Carrera Panamericana to be held two weeks later. He accepted Chinetti's offer and his adrenalin addiction reached new levels as he watched Chinetti pilot a Ferrari 375 Plus across 2,000 miles of Mexican roads at breakneck speed from the passenger seat.

Portago immediately purchased his own 4.5-liter Ferrari and in January, 1954 claimed second place outright in a Ferrari 250 MM at the 1,000 km of Buenos Aires. Rather than rise though the rankings, de Portago took a meteoric leap and a year after sitting beside Chinetti as passenger, he retired from the 1954 Carrera Panamericana when his Ferrari 750 Monza broke down – he was in the lead at the time.

A month later, de Portago placed second at the Venezuelan Grand Prix in a Ferrari Monza, behind Juan Manuel Fangio's Maserati 300S. Fangio would later say of de Portago, "I considered him one of the most courageous of all the racing drivers … a good driver and an excellent comrade." In December 1954, barely 12 months after his first ride as a passenger in a race car, the swashbuckling Marquis took three victories at the Bahamas Speed Week.

In early 1956, de Portago became an official Scuderia Ferrari driver, enabling him to campaign an assortment of Ferraris (857 S, 860 Monza, 500 TR, and 625 LM) as well as getting access to purchase one of Maranello's new 250 GT racing berlinettas, (this car – 0557GT), in which he won the Tour de France Auto and Coupes du Salon, as well as the Coupes du USA in April 1957.

De Portago's outsized personality played well in the media, where he was endlessly quotable, and his regular "punch ups" made for great newspaper headlines. By the time of his death while competing in the 1957 Mille Miglia, he was widely considered to be among the best drivers in the world. He competed in just five Formula One Grands Prix, with three DNFs, a fifth and a second place in the 1956 British Grand Prix, a drive he shared with Peter Collins.

While de Portago tempted mortality once too often, his legend and this car endured. It was restored to concours condition, won first in class at Pebble Beach and Meadow Brook, took the Prix Blancpain Award at the Louis Vuitton Concours d'Elegance and a Platinum Award at the Cavallino Classic.

The auction description calls this car a "once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to acquire one of the most historically significant competition Ferraris of all time" and that pretty much sums it up – TdF models rarely appear at auction and this one last saw the auction block at a Brooks Olympia (UK) sale in November, 1992 when it sold for £528,000 (US$802,560). It might be a long time until it comes around again.

24 | 1953 Jaguar C-Type Works Lightweight

US$13,200,000
August, 2015
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

There were just 53 C-Type Jaguars built. Three lightweight works cars (of which this car is one), and a run of 50 cars to satisfy customer demand after the factory cars finished first, second and fourth in the 1953 Le Mans 24 Hour event. The biggest difference to the competition were the disc brakes. Endurance racing was born to demonstrate reliability and validate new automotive technologies for the masses and just as it has done more recently with hybrid and diesel drivetrains, Le Mans heralded the coming of age of a new braking technology with this car and its works siblings.

The winning C-type was the first to average more than 100 mph for the 24 Hours of Le Mans (105.8 mph, 170 km/h), and this car, which finished fourth, also broke the ton, averaging 104 mph (167 km/h).

25 | 1953 Ferrari 340/375 MM Berlinetta 'Competizione'

This is a car of legend. It is the CAR in which Umberto Maglioli famously averaged 222 km/h (138 mph) for the final 365 km (227 mile) stage of the infamous Carrera Panamericana to ensure Ferrari won the 1953 World Sports Car Championship - an all-time record for a public road stage that will undoubtedly stand forever, at least in the bizarre circumstance of having the public using the same roads while the race is in progress.

US$12,745,707 (sold for €9,856,000)
May, 2013
Tivoli, Lazio, Italy
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

This is one very special automobile for many reasons. It is a genuine factory Ferrari racing car, and was driven in the World Sports Car Championship by three World Champions: Mike Hawthorn, Alberto Ascari, and Giuseppe "Nino" Farina.

It was one of the three works 375 MM cars entered at the 1953 24 Hours of Le Mans race where it was disqualified while running in second place (driven by Hawthorn and Farina) because brake fluid had been added during a pit stop on the 12th lap, violating an obscure rule that prohibited the addition of any fluids before the 28th lap.

The car went on to play an integral part of Ferrari's 1953 World Sports Car Manufacturer's Championship, participated in the 24 Hour of Spa, and won the 12 Hours of Pescara.

There is one particular feat however, which stands above all that - this car achieved the fastest road stage average speed ever recorded, and in a world championship event at that.

We've already mentioned the outrageous Carrera Panamericana road race staged on public roads in Mexico in the early fifties in coverage of the 1954 Ferrari 375-Plus Spider Competizione which sits in third place in this Top 100 list. The Carrera Panamericana was legally sanctioned insanity.

This car (0320AM) was one of five 375 MM Ferraris entered in the 1953 Carrera Panamericana, all competing under the private banner of Franco Cornacchia's Scuderia della Guastalla. It began the race driven by Mario Ricci, but during the fifth stage of the Carrera, Umberto Maglioli's identical 375 MM (0358AM) lost a rear wheel and was unable to continue in the event – the attrition rate was understandably horrific with only one third of cars completing the race.

As the regulations of the Panamericana allowed for the substitution of drivers, Maglioli was then swapped into Ricci's 0320AM and set about ensuring Ferrari collected the points it needed to overhaul Jaguar in the final event of the 1953 World Sports Car Championship.

Maglioli moved the car from eighth place when he took over, to a sixth place at the finish, but his drive during the eighth and final 365 km (227 mile) stage of the race is the stuff of legend.

In this car, Maglioli AVERAGED 222 km/h (138 mph), an all-time record for a public road stage that will undoubtedly stand forever, at least in the bizarre circumstance of having the public present while the race is in progress.

Part of a world championship, a car of legend, and beautiful too, it has been presented at and awarded at numerous concours d'elegance, including Pebble Beach, the Louis Vuitton Classic, and the Goodwood Revival.

26 | 1957 Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa

US$12,187,280 (Sold for €9,020,000)
May, 2009
Maranello, Emilia-Romagna, Italy
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

Another former world record holder for the most expensive car ever sold at auction, as we predicted and reported back in 2009. This was the fourth Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa built and the second customer car.

27 | 1933 Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 Monza

US$11,990,000
August, 2016
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

Not many cars have ever sold for more than ten million dollars, signifying how special this third-series 2.3 Monza with Brianza Coachwork is. It was owned and raced by many prominent Italian drivers between 1933 and 1950, and was the winner of the 1947 Sport Nazionale Championship with Renato Balestrero driving.

28 | 1936 Mercedes-Benz 540K Spezial Roadster

This ultra-rare 540 K Special Roadster was purchased new in 1936 as the personal car of Baroness Gisela von Krieger of Prussia. Among the very elite of international society, the beautiful Baroness was named one of the ten most fashionable women in the world, mixed with European society's elite, led a very colourful lifestyle and kept the car until her passing in 1989.

US$11,770,000
August, 2012
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

Like most cars on this list, this Hermann Ahrens-designed Special Roadster 540 K Special Roadster has a tale to tell. The beautiful Baroness enjoyed a privileged life for many years, residing at the Ritz and Hotel Le Meurice in Paris, Hotel Martinez in Cannes, and frequenting the best European destinations and social events, including the coronation of King George VI. Suitors adored and admired her, and in one account a devastated gentleman jumped out of a plane to his death after his proposal of marriage was declined.

Unlike many supercharged Mercedes-Benz, which were often stolen or lost during the war, the von Krieger's Special Roadster remained an important possession of the family, carefully stored and accounted for even while they lived outside of Germany avoiding Nazi orders. In 1942, at the height of the war, Baroness Gisela shipped the car to Switzerland.

With her beloved Special Roadster as a comforting reminder of her carefree past, she continued traveling on her own for several years throughout Europe seeking sanctuary from the war. After the war ended and the family reunited, Gisela and her brother Henning moved to New York, shipping the Special Roadster on the Queen Elizabeth. To escape the city's heat, Baroness von Krieger summered at the Homestead Inn in Greenwich, where she kept her precious Special Roadster.

Following the death of her brother and mother, Baroness Gisela returned to Switzerland where she lived as a recluse until her passing in 1989. Still among her impressive possessions was the Mercedes-Benz Special Roadster, tucked away in a Greenwich garage for the better part of four decades. The 540 K remained an undisturbed time capsule, with such items as the Baroness's driving maps, lipstick-stained cigarette butts and silk gloves intact.

29 | 1964 Ferrari 250 LM by Scaglietti

US$11,550,000
August, 2014
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

Like the Ferrari GTO, (the car it replaced), the LM is another model which is destined for public recognition due to the prices it commands on the auction block. Ferrari won the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1960, 1961, 1962 and 1963 and at the Paris Automobile Show in October 1963 it showed the replacement for the GTO – the 250 LM. Though it had been intended to compete in the GT category, only 32 units were ever built and 100 were needed for homologation, so it had to compete in the prototype class. It nonetheless lived up to its name and won Le Mans outright in 1965 at the hands of the NART driving combination of Masten Gregory, Ed Hugus and Jochen Rindt.

30 | 1960 Ferrari 250 GT SWB

US$11,439,774 (Sold for £7,392,000)
October, 2015
Duxford, Cambridgshire, U.K.
Official H&H Auction Page

First shown at the 1959 Paris Salon, the 250 GT SWB Berlinetta was the fastest, most accomplished 3.0-liter GT racing car that money could buy. Honed by Giotto Bizzarrini, Carlo Chiti and Mauro Forghieri, the same team that would later develop the equally successful but even more rare 250 GTO, the newcomer's combination of low weight, high power, well-sorted suspension and four-wheel disc brakes brought it success worldwide. Driven by such greats as Stirling Moss and Phil Hill, from 1960 to 1961 SWBs won the RAC Tourist Trophy, the Tour de France Automobile and the Paris 1,000 km. Another was third overall at the 1961 Le Mans 24 Hours, behind two Ferrari prototypes.

Authenticity is becoming much sought-after in collectibles at present, and this car has never been "restored" in the modern sense, making it that much more attractive to serious collectors. Hence the price. Full story.

31 | 1960 Ferrari 250 GT California LWB Competizione Spider

US$11,275,000
August, 2012
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

This 1960 Ferrari 250 GT LWB Alloy California Spider, chassis 1639 GT, is one of only nine alloy-bodied LWB California Spiders ever built, complete with the desirable covered headlights and full race specifications.

When new, this car was delivered to the prestigious Illinois-based Ferrari dealer and racer George Reed and displayed at the 1960 Chicago Auto Show. In the late 1970s, Sherman Wolf purchased the California Spider, a significant acquisition for the first-time Ferrari owner who later drove it on the inaugural Colorado Grand.

In addition to its lightweight alloy body, it is equipped with full competition specifications including an outside plug motor with TR heads, disc brakes, velocity stacks and a ribbed gearbox. Restored by Ferrari specialist David Carte, this alloy-bodied California Spider was sold in show condition.

32 | 1968 Ford GT40

The camera car for the 1971 blockbuster Steve McQueen film Le Mans, the full history of this GT40 is available on the official RM auction page and its drivers during its racing period include Jacky Ickx, Dr. Dick Thompson, David Hobbs, Brian Redman, Mike Hailwood, and Paul Hawkins.

US$11,000,000
The second most valuable movie car ever sold at auction
August, 2012
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auctions

Ford's GT40 was the American car which took on the dominant Ferrari team in sports car racing and won. (Full history here). This 1968 GT40 was the first of three lightweight production GT40s which number among the very first race cars to utilise carbon fibre-reinforced bodywork, and one of just two surviving examples.

It was driven by some of the best drivers of the period including Jacky Ickx, Mike Hailwood, Dr. Dick Thompson, David Hobbs, Brian Redman, and Paul Hawkins.

Undoubtedly, Le Mans is one of the best films ever made about motor racing, but it is the association with the film in general and Steve McQueen in particular that has most likely added the X-factor which vaulted this car into the most valuable cars ever sold at auction.

33 | 1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spider

James Coburn in the 1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spider which set a world record of EUR 7,040,000 (US$10,894,900) at RM Auctions Ferrari – Leggenda e Passione" auction in May, 2008. Image: RM Auctions

US$10,894,900 (sold for €7,040,000)
May, 2008
Maranello, Emilia-Romagna, Italy
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

You'll find this 1961 Ferrari 250 GT California Spider listed in many reputable internet sites as the Ferrari driven in the movie Ferris Bueller's Day Off. It isn't that car but it was owned and loved for more than 20 years by one of the screen's greatest male leads, James CoburnThe sale made headlines globally because it was purchased by British TV and radio personality Chris Evans for US$10.895 million, which at the time was a world record.

34 | 1932 Bugatti Type 55

US$10,400,000
August, 2016
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

This is possibly the finest Type 55 in existence. The Type 55 is a road-going version of the Bugatti Type 54 Grand Prix car, and this Roadster was the Bugatti factory's entry in the 1932 Mille Miglia driven by Achille Varzi and Count Castelbarco. The car underwent an exacting restoration that was completed in 2013 by Marque Authority Laurent Rondoni.

35 | 1931 Duesenberg Model J Long-Wheelbase Coupe

US$10,340,000
August, 2011
Monterey, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

In its press release announcing the forthcoming offering of this vehicle, Gooding & Company, described it as "the most elegant American Classic ever created":

A bespoke Duesenberg Long Wheelbase Model J, the Whittell Coupe was originally designed by Murphy Coach Builders under the direction of one of America's outlandish Roaring Twenties bad boys, Captain George Whittell Jr.

Beautifully-restored and boasting just 12,000 original miles, the automotive masterpiece captivates admirers with its striking and glamorous black, red and chrome livery. Originally purchased in 1931 for $17,000, the Whittell Coupe is now considered to be one of the most extraordinary and valuable Duesenbergs in existence.

Historically, Duesenberg Model J owners were among the most powerful and worldly of America's pre-war elite and, with six model Js in his collection, George Whittell was Duesenberg's best customer of all time, even surpassing Clark Gable and Gary Cooper," said David Gooding, President and founder of Gooding & Company. "In my opinion, the Whittell Coupe we are presenting in Pebble Beach is the most elegant custom-bodied American Classic ever created and among the finest automobiles built prior to World War II.

Captain George Whittell Jr. was heir to an impressive California Gold Rush and real estate fortune, and the ultimate playboy of his day, who famously liquidated his entire stock portfolio (approximately $50 Million at the time) just two weeks before the infamous stock market crash of 1929. A larger-than-life public figure in San Francisco society, Whittell engaged in numerous escapades with women, reckless street racing and outrageous public appearances, like the time he famously showed up to a local tavern with Bill, his pet lion. Whittell's love for exotic beasts, along with his appreciation of technology, influenced his many private collections and the creative design of his legendary 40,000–acre Lake Tahoe estate, Thunderbird Lodge.

The Whittell Coupe is the result of a unique collaboration between Captain Whittell and legendary automotive stylist, Franklin Q. Hershey, who began his career at Murphy Coach Builders just before Whittell commissioned the renowned Pasadena firm to create this Duesenberg. The Whittell Coupe was one of Hershey's earliest projects and its brilliance helped launch him on a successful design career. Recognized for his great influence in the automotive community, Hershey was elected to be an honorary judge at the Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance in 1988, a role he served for nearly ten years.

The entire car is a masterpiece and one of the few automotive designs that is perfectly proportioned from every perspective," adds Gooding & Company Specialist David Brynan. "And the interior, in and of itself, is a work of deco-era art, which is a key feature that makes the Whittell Coupe stand apart.

The culmination of Whittell's visionary ideas of proportion and detail resulted in one of the most exquisitely-executed Classic cars of all time. Under his direction, the powerful two-passenger, sporting coupe was constructed atop a long-wheelbase chassis, which added a dramatic 11 inches to the standard Model J frame. The most distinguishing feature of the Duesenberg is its low-slung, brushed-aluminum roof, designed with a complete folding top mechanism and exterior "bows", to mimic the closed fabric top of a convertible coupe.

The car is enhanced with numerous unique characteristics including a chrome-plated gas tank, port and starboard lights inspired by the Captain's love of boats and a polished chrome "waterfall" adorning the rear deck. The Whittell Coupe also boasts a lavish black patent leather interior, decorated with a polished-aluminum and black Bakelite cockpit, as well as a brilliant red undercarriage, just as it did when Whittell took delivery in 1931. With the turn of its key, the Whittell Coupe's mighty 420 cubic inch, inline eight-cylinder engine springs to life with a low rumble, and the gentleman's car smoothly transitions from a still beauty to a powerful mechanical masterpiece.

36 | 1982 Porsche 956

US$10,120,000
August, 2015
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

This car finished second in the 1982 Le Mans 24 Hour Race in the hands Jochen Mass and Vern Schuppan, taking part in the iconic 1-2-3 victory (pictured above), then served as the Porsche team's top car for the remainder of the 1982 season, primarily driven by Ickx, Mass, and Bell.

In September and October of 1982, this car (956-003) won the last three World Endurance Championship (WEC) races (Spa, Fuji, and Brands Hatch) of the WEC season and a non-championship race at Kyalami (South Africa), securing the WEC Drivers' Championship for Ickx and the Manufacturers' Championship for Porsche.

It returned to Le Mans in 1983, starting in seventh position on the grid behind the two other Rothmans Porsche entries (956-005 and 956-008), but won the race in thrilling fashion, leading a near-whitewash of the results and enabling the inspired and famous Porsche advertising poster that many readers might remember from the day (pictured above).

37 | 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4


US$10,175,000
August, 2014
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

Delivered new to Hollywood and motoring icon Steve McQueen on the set of the movie Bullitt and owned by McQueen for more than four years, the car was subsequently owned by Guy Williams, of Zorro and Lost in Space TV-show fame.

Restored by Ferrari Classiche to McQueen's original specification, the car is Classiche certified, spent time in Ferrari's museum exhibit "From Cinecittà to Hollywood" and pror to this sale was owned by former F1, Indy, and Le Mans racer Vern Schuppan.

So beloved by the baby boomer generation is McQueen that the race suit he wore as Michael Delaney in the film Le Mans was sold at auction by memorabilia specialist Profiles in History for an astonishing $984,000 – almost as much as the 1971 Porsche 911S which he drove for the first three minutes and 40 seconds of the 1971 film.

38 | 1937 Mercedes-Benz 540K Special Roadster

US$9,900,000
January, 2016
Scottsdale, Arizona, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

Only 25 Mercedes–Benz 540K Spezial Roadsters were ever made, far fewer have survived to this day, and the massive, handcrafted art deco sculpture was the absolute pinnacle of automotive desirability from the moment it was launched at the Paris Auto Salon in 1936.

This car is a pre-production example and was originally delivered to the United States (and hence left-hand-drive) in the most desirable long tail and high door configuration. Remarkably for an eighty year old car, it has only traveled 10,277 miles from new.

39 | 1937 Bugatti Type 57SC Sports Tourer

US$9,735,000
March, 2016
Amelia Island, Florida, U.S.
Official Bonhams Auction Page

40 | 1937 Mercedes-Benz 540K Spezial Roadster

US$9,680,000
August, 2011
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

The Mercedes-Benz 540 K was one of the most prestigious and – in the eyes of many – the most beautiful automobile of the interwar years. Its combination of power, light weight and sheer beauty made it the master of the road, and it was a testimonial to the astonishing capabilities of the German automotive engineers of the day.

It was also breathtakingly expensive, guaranteeing exclusivity amongst its owners; just 419 chassis were built, and of those, only 25 carried the superlative long tail Spezial Roadster coachwork that may well have been the high point of the coachbuilder's art at Mercedes-Benz's own "Sonderwagenbau" in Sindelfingen.

Of the 25 540 K Spezial Roadsters, only a limited few were created in the long tail style with a cover over the single spare tire recessed into the rear deck, one of which this car is one.

41 | 1931 Bugatti Royale Kellner Coupe

US$9,666,250 (Sold for £5,500,000)
November, 1987
London, U.K.
Auctioned by Christies (No link to auction page available)

The 1931 Bugatti Royale Kellner Coupe sold for £5,500,000 (US$9,666,250) in November, 1987 at a Christies auction in London. It was for many years the most expensive car ever sold at auction and still retains a place in the top 20 more than a quarter of a century later.

The Type 41 "La Royale" was a massive project championed by Jean Bugatti designed to create a car exclusively for royalty, and when conceived, it was anticipated that 25 would be built.

This particular car was personally commissioned by Ettore Bugatti to Kellner Coachbuilding Company with a view to making an impression on the rich British marketplace at the 1932 Olympia Show.

At £6,500, it was the most expensive car at the show. Allowing for inflation and exchange rates at the time (GBP1.00 = US$4.87) puts its relative value at US$458,000.

The Great Depression was taking its toll however, and despite the grandest plans of the world's most technologically outstanding automaker of the day, only a handful of T41s were ever built (believed to be six or seven units). Despite this failure in business terms, the "Royale" was one of the largest and most extravagant automobiles ever created.

The Kellner car failed to sell in depression-racked Britain and remained in the Bugatti family until after WWII when it was purchased from L'Ebe Bugatti by Briggs Cunningham to become part of his famous collection which was on display for many years at the Cunningham Museum in Costa Mesa, California. The car was sold by Cunningham in this sale and unconfirmed reports suggest it was privately resold in 1990 at a price around double this one. Ownership is presently unknown, though Volkswagen Group, owner of the Bugatti marque, is known to have purchased at least two of the six known Royales.

42 | 1964 Ferrari 250 LM

US$9,625,000
January, 2015
Scottsdale, Arizona, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

Ferrari's 250 LM holds a special place in Ferrari history, being the last car from Maranello to win the prestigious "24 Heures du Mans" half a century ago (1965). This car is the ninth of 32 LMs built, has an extensive race history (including an initial campaign by Scuderia Filipinetti with Ludovico Scarfiotti and Nino Vaccarella behind the wheel) and has at times been fitted with a different engine, had its chassis shortened, and been fitted with the body of a Porsche 906 Carrera, complete with gullwing doors. It was purchased in 1977 by Eric Stewart (from British pop band 10CC) who set about restoring it to original factory condition including finding and fitting the original motor. That massive restoration resulted in Ferrari Classiche certification. The end result is that the car was sold on January 17, 2015 at RM's Scottsdale auction for US$ $9,625,000, along with a complete ownership history (including such notable collectors as Paul Schouwenburg, Lord Irvine Laidlaw, Federico Della Noce, and Henri-Louis Maunoir) documented by Ferrari historian Marcel Massini.

43 | 1957 Ferrari 250 GT

US$9,460,000
January, 2014
Scottsdale, Arizona, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

One of only nine examples built and eight remaining, this 1957 Ferrari 250 GT has seen action in some of the great races, including ninth outright and fourth in class in the 1957 Mille Miglia, fourth outright in the 1957 Coppa Inter-Europa and a participant in the inaugural Colorado Grand, making it eligible for participation in the Mille Miglia and similar prestigious events of today.

An exacting restoration by Dennison International, 2010 Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance Award Winner and full documentation by Ferrari Historian Marcel Massini.

44 | 1935 Alfa Romeo Tipo C 8C-35

US$9,425,188 (Sold for £5,937,500)
September, 2013
Goodwood, U.K.
Official Bonhams Auction Page

One of the great pre-war Grand Prix racing cars - the ex-Tazio Nuvolari 1935 Alfa Romeo Tipo C 8C-35 '50013' - Scuderia Ferrari Nr '65' sold for GBP£5,937,500 at Bonhams Goodwood Revival Meeting on September 14, 2013, setting a new world record for an Alfa Romeo sold at auction.

The 330-horsepower supercharged Alfa Romeo 8C-35 was campaigned as new by Alfa's proxy factory team, the celebrated Scuderia Ferrari – including the legendary Tazio Nuvolari, one of the greatest racing drivers of all time.

The supercharged Alfa Romeo Tipo C 8C-35 Grand Prix car is a superb example of the first all-independently-suspended, big-engined Grand Prix racing design from Alfa Romeo which the Portello factory tailor-made in 1936 to combat the might of the rival State-backed German 'Silver Arrow' Mercedes-Benz W25E and Auto Union C-Type cars. It was in this Alfa Romeo and its sisters that the legendary Italian superstar driver Tazio Nuvolari and his team-mates fought a bitter rearguard action against the overwhelming might of the German teams and their own star drivers such as Bernd Rosemeyer, Rudi Caracciola, Manfred von Brauchitsch and Hans Stuck. Here is an artifact which in essence these great names would have seen, touched, experienced, campaigned and confronted around the world's most demanding road racing circuits of the mid-1930s.

45 | 1966 Ferrari 275GTB Competizione

US$9,405,000
January, 2015
Scottsdale, Arizona, U.S.
Official Bonhams Auction Page

A three-time participant in the GT Class at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, and boasting the 1967 GT Class win in the race (and 11th outright), this 1966 Ferrari 275GTB Competizione (chassis 09079) was campaigned by the famous Scuderia Filipinetti, one of Ferrari's four factory-preferred privateer teams.

With class wins in both the 1000 Kms de Spa-Francorchamps and 500 Kms de Imola, chassis 09079 has an impeccable race provenance, combined with rarity and specialty of construction, being the second-to-last GT car ever built by Ferrari's factory competition department, representing a long line of important models dating to the 340 Mexico and 166 MM.

The car is certified by Ferrari Classiche and accompanied by an original factory build card, promising to draw major consideration at world-class Concours d'Elegance and prestigious Ferrari events. At Pebble Beach, this car was adjudged second in its class, losing by a few tenths of a point to the prototype Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa (chassis no. 0666TR) which sits in the top ten cars on this listing.

In October 2014, this car enjoyed the distinguished privilege of being invited by Ferrari to take part in Driving Through the Decades, the 60th Anniversary celebration of Ferrari North America held in Beverly Hills, California. The Competizione was one of just sixty special Ferraris from across America chosen for display on the Sunday morning concours on Rodeo Drive, a rare honor and indication of just how significant the car is among Ferrari's greatest motorcars.

46 | 1962 Ferrari 330 TRI/LM Spider

US$9,288,469 (Sold for €6,875,000)
May, 2007
Maranello,Emilia-Romagna, Italy
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

Another Ferrari with all the boxes ticked for a stellar price, this car is the very last Testa Rossa and also the last front-engined sports racing car built by Ferrari. As the official RM auction page for the car points out, "The first car in a series is good. But the last car is best. It is inevitably refined, improved and developed. Its weaknesses have been addressed and its strengths have been enhanced."

This 1962 Ferrari 330 TRI/LM, chassis number 0808, is also the only 4-litre Testa Rossa built, and was driven by the highly successful endurance racing pairing of Phil Hill and Olivier Gendebien to outright victory in the 1962 Le Mans 24 Hour Race.

There is much more to this car. Technically, it has twice qualified for a top 20 placing on this listing, having been auctioned by RM Auctions at Pebble Beach in August, 2002, selling for US$6,490,000. It would no doubt move into a top ten spot if it were to cross the auction block again.

47 | 1953 Ferrari 375 MM Spider

US$9,075,000
August, 2013
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

This car was commissioned, owned, and raced new by legendary driver, James "Gentleman Jim" Kimberly, the grandson of one of four founders of the Kimberly-Clark Corporation, which produced Kleenex and a variety of other paper products. It then proceeded to win all but one of the races in the 1954 SCCA National Championship. It is one of only twelve 375MM Spiders, the only 375MM Spider with unique pontoon-fenders, and liveried in unique "Kimberly Red.

A detailed and illustrious provenance, an exhaustive and well-documented restoration and single-family ownership from 1968 until it was auctioned at Monterey in 2013 resulted in its stellar price.

48 | 1958 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider

US$8,800,000
January, 2014
Scottsdale, Arizona, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

This car is the eleventh of just 50 LWB California Spiders built. The California Spider is as close as Ferrari came to building a touring class sports car since the early Barchettas, and only it and the later 275 GTB/4 N.A.R.T. Spiders have the elemental high-speed, open-air attitude that sets these cars apart from their more common cabriolet counterparts. Chassis 1055 GT is a spectacular example, with a notable absence of apparent or known damage in its well-documented past. Photo: Patrick Ernzen

49 | 1937 Bugatti Type 57SC Atalante


US$8,745,000
August, 2013
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

The 1937 Bugatti Type 57SC Atalante is an undisputed masterpiece of automotive art, designed by Jean Bugatti with a competition-derived surbaisse chassis and a factory supercharger.

Just two supercharged Type 57SC cars were built new, but most 57S owners wanted the additional power afforded by the blower. Therefore, most of the original Type 57S cars returned to Molsheim for the installation of a supercharger, pushing output from 175 hp (130 kW) to 200 hp (150 kW) and 120 mph (190 km/h).

This 1937 SC is an extremely authentic example with original chassis, engine and coachwork and features outstanding, unbroken provenance including participation in the prestigious inaugural International Bugatti Meeting in 1958.

Faithfully presented at auction in its original black livery, this Bugatti was masterfully restored to the highest standards and was awarded first in class at The Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance in 2011. Fully documented by Bugatti Historian Julius Kruta.

50 | 1962 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spider

US$8,580,000
August, 2012
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official RM Auction Page

Another stunning SWB 250 GT California Spider (chassis no. 3119 GT). Sold new in March 1962, through the official Belgian importer Jacques Swaters', eventually finding its way to the United Staes. The car was shown at the 40th Annual Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance, where it won its class. It was subsequently shown at the 29th Annual Ferrari Club of America national meeting in Palm Beach, where it was also a class winner. Full history.

51 | 1959 Ferrari 250 GT Competizione Alloy Berlinetta

US$8,525,000
August, 2015
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official RM Auction Page

52 | 1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider

US$8,525,000
August, 2015
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

53 | 1997 McLaren F1

US$8,470,000
August, 2013
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

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The McLaren F1 is a modern day supercar that became an instant collectible when it was released in 1994.

McLaren developed a racing version of the F1 road car to run in the FIA GT1 category in the 1995 season. Despite a design and development period of just 3 months, the F1 GTR swept all before it, winning not only the 1995 GT1 Championship, but also the 24 Heures du Mans on its debut.

McLaren not only won, but dominated the rain-soaked endurance race, finishing in 1st, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 13th places.

Just how collectible the F1 would become was not entirely evident at the time the cars were available, but it's stocks grew quite quickly.

In 1998, with a total of 106 of all variants built and its production run complete, the McLaren F1 went on to achieve its greatest feat outside competitive motorsport. McLaren development and race driver Andy Wallace took XP5, the fifth and final prototype F1 with some 45,000 hard test miles on the clock, to the Ehra-Lessien proving ground in Germany and on 31st March 1998 set a world record for a production car of 240.1mph.

Several production cars have since gone faster (the Koenigsegg Agera R, the Bugatti Veyron, the SSC Ultimate Aero TT, the Hennessey Venom GT and the Bugatti Veyron Super Sport), but the McLaren F1 remains the fastest naturally-aspirated (i.e. not turbo-charged or super-charged) production car to this day. There are many "firsts" which make the McLaren F1 road car very special but the biggest was that unlike previous supercars, it was not constructed primarily of metal (or wood).

In 1981, McLaren became the first team in Formula 1 to use a carbon fibre chassis and in 1984 it used those techniques to create the most successful Formula 1 car in history – the McLaren MP4/4.

Having completed just a handful of laps in the new 1988 MP4/4 at the beginning of 1984, Alain Prost reportedly told Team Principle Ron Dennis that he knew the car would win the World Championship. The car won 15 of 16 races in the hands of Prost and Ayrton Senna.

The construction techniques refined in Formula One were developed to create the carbon monocoque for the McLaren F1 with the resulting structure weighing just 100 kg whilst offering the highest levels of strength and safety. The bare carbon fibre passenger doors weighed just 7 kg each (which included the weight of the side intrusion beam).

The F1 defined the McLaren road car DNA: low weight, low polar moment of inertia, clever packaging, superb quality and innovative design, resulting in an outstanding driving experience.

The F1 bristles with innovative design. The central driving position, which ensures superb visibility and no compromise on control positions for the driver; the pannier side lockers providing unprecedented levels of luggage capacity in a car of this type; the patented suspension system to provide both control and ride quality.

The McLaren F1 was launched at a price of £540,000 in 1994 – at an exchange rate of 1.5355, that price of US$829,170 represents an excellent investment by comparison to the US$8,470,000 paid for this 1997 model at Pebble Beach in 2013. For a recent road car, it's unprecedented.

Over the course of the next four years (1994-98), just 64 F1 road cars were produced, plus five F1 LM and three F1 GT road cars. There were also 28 F1 GTR race cars and six prototypes produced.

The word was out long before the 2013 Pebble Beach sale that the McLaren F1 was going to become a benchmark in automobile investment – one of those cars which would become so cherished by collectors and drive values forever skyward.

A 1997 McLaren F1 recently deposed from this Top 100 list was sold at RM Auctions' Automobiles of London sale in October, 2008 for £2,530,000 (US$4,058,120).

There were those who thought the price paid was one of those irrational behaviors which auctions regularly throw up, and there were those who thought it indicative that the modern day supercar had been recognized. The latter is now known to be true, and already that investment is proving to be spectacularly successful.

A 1995 McLaren F1 was sold by Gooding & Co at the same Pebble Beach venue in 2010 for US$3,575,000 and it seems certain that other McLaren F1s will appear over the coming years.

So newsworthy are the F1s that reports of private sales are surfacing. The U.K. Sun reported an F1 sold privately for £3,500,000 (US$5,580,000) in November 2012.

Jalopnik recently reported that an F1 (chassis #28) which McLaren built for Michael Andretti to secure "his early departure from their F1 team" had changed hands yet again, for a reported US$10.5 million.

There is of course, an even rarer and more powerful F1 – the F1 LM.

This is McLaren's description of the LM: The McLaren F1 LM was a more extreme version of the F1 road car, and even more than the GTR on which it was based. With a version of the race-spec 6.1-litre V12 BMW engine from the F1 GTR, but without any race restrictors, the F1 LM produces more power – 680 bhp in total.

The styling is heavily derived from the race-winning car, with the front bodywork and rear wing are based on those of the GTR, and full underbody ground effect with a Le Mans-inspired diffuser to optimise downforce. Weight-saving measures are extreme as well, with the F1 LM actually tipping the scales 60 kg lighter than the race version.

The XP car, along with three of the five production models, is finished in the historic Papaya orange paintwork, in homage to the early Bruce McLaren racing cars.

In 1999, XP1 LM joined the standard McLaren F1 road car in the record books, when Andy Wallace set a new 0-100-0 mph standard of 11.5 seconds at RAF Alconbury. Acceleration was such that, from a standstill, 60 mph was reached in less than 4 seconds, 100 mph within 7 seconds, on to a top speed of 225 mph.

While this is lower than the "standard" McLaren F1 due to the GTR-derived rear wing which increases drag, the improved levels of downforce give considerable advantage to cornering performance.

The Sultan of Brunei reportedly purchased two of the five LMs, with special black paint. Don't expect any F1 LMs at market any time soon, but if they did appear, they'd be at the top of this list.

54 | 1958 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider

US$8,250,000
January, 2013
Scottsdale, Arizona, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

55 | 1955 Ferrari 410S

US$8,250,000
August, 2012,
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

56 | 1928 Mercedes-Benz 680S Torpedo Roadster

US$8,250,000
August, 2013
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

It's little surprise that this 1928 Mercedes-Benz 680S fetched a price of US$8,250,000 at auction, having Best of Show title at the 2012 Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance. The bodywork was designed by famous French coachbuilder Jacques Saoutchik, captured the hearts of the judges, who named it the finest vehicle on display at the prestigious event – quite some honour considering the company.

The low-slung torpedo roadster body by Carrosserie J. Saoutchik, of Paris, is a perfect example of coachbuilding of the late 1920s. It showcases some of the more exotic materials available to the coachbuilders of the day. The hides used to create the lizard skin interior were supplied by Alpina, a company that sourced products from the French colonies in Southeast Asia. The beautiful trim wood, known as Purpleheart, was also sourced out of the French colonies in South America.

Establishing himself by creating stylish designs coupled with high-quality workmanship, Saoutchik took many risks with design and materials. Nicknamed the "Viollet-le-Duc," after a famously creative French architect, he was obsessed by form and often used brightwork appliqué to highlight the strong lines of his coachwork.

His background as a cabinet maker is evidenced in the tight tolerances and body panel fits that can be seen on his creations. One of his favoured design features, the disappearing top, provides an elegant and innovative solution to hide the convertible top.

57 | 1951 Ferrari 340 America Barchetta

US$8,231,150 (Sold for €9,425,187)
May, 2016
Monte Carlo, Monaco
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

58 | 1953 Jaguar XK120C 'C-Type' Sports-Racing Two-Seater

US$8,182,900 (Sold for €7,245,000)
May, 2016
Monte Carlo, Monaco
Official Bonhams Auction Page

This car embodies racing just as it was 60 years ago, being unique in that it is an unrestored ex-Le Mans 24-Hour race Jaguar C-Type sports car. That's the car being refueled in 1953 at Le Sarthe.

Bonhams worked with historians and notable marque specialists, to piece together the history of this car, correcting accepted Jaguar history in the process.

The car turned out to be the 1953 Belgian-entered Ecurie Francorchamps Le Mans car in totality, rather than the combination of several cars it was thought to be.

59 | 1960 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta Competizione


US$8,140,000
January, 2013
Scottsdale, Arizona, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

In the finest tradition of Ferrari's dual-purpose road and racing berlinettas, the new 250 GT SWB was a tractable and well-mannered daily driver about town, but it was a veritable beast in a race, where the ever more powerfully-tuned Colombo V-12 and revised rear suspension delivered unprecedented performance.

Competition-specification cars with additionally uprated engines and lighweight alloy aluminum bodies were immediately made available for racing customers, 43 of these competizione examples were made in the model's first year of production, 1960. (Just two SWB examples were produced in late-1959, the show cars of Paris and Torino.)

The SWB immediately fulfilled the legacy of its LWB predecessor, claiming victories at the Tour de France from 1960 to 1962, and at the RAC Tourist Trophy classic races at Goodwood in 1960 and 1961, where famed driver Stirling Moss was overwhelming in his praise of the car. "As a grand touring car for really serious road racing," he later recalled of the SWB, "it was quite difficult to fault, in fact."

60 | 1950 Ferrari 275S/340 America Barchetta

US$7,975,000
August, 2015
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

61 | 1937 Mercedes-Benz 540K Special Roadster

US$8,106,150 (Sold for £3,905,000)
October, 2007
London, U.K.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

Mercedes-Benz built 406 of its powerful, massive 540K models and only 26 of them were the sleek, luxurious, imposing Special Roadsters such as this 1937 model. One of the most striking variations on the Special Roadster theme, it is the high-door, long-tail version with exposed spare wheels and tyres built into the rear deck. The car was delivered new through Mercedes-Benz UK in 1937 to Sir John Chubb, of the lock family.

After the war, the ownership of this car changed hands several times, crossing the Atlantic twice and along the way picking up an Antique Automobile Club of America National First Place award in 1987 and a first in class award at Pebble Beach in 1988.

It became part of the Bernie Ecclestone Collection in 1995 and was sold by RM/Sothebys for US$8,252,201 in October, 2007.

62 | 1937 Bugatti Type 57SC Atalante Coupe

US$7,920,000
August, 2008
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

63 | 1929 4½-Litre Supercharged 'Blower' Bentley Single-Seater

The Blower Bentley in main and top right on the Brooklands banking. Top left is two-time Le Mans winner Sir Henry Birkit and many-time land speed record holder Malcolm Campbell, waiting for a race to get underway.

US$7,906,745 (Sold for £5,041,500)
June, 2012
Goodwood,Sussex, U.K.
Official Bonhams Auction Page

This 1929 4½-Litre "Blower" (supercharged) Bentley has a provenance of the highest order, having broken the Brooklands outer circuit lap record in 1931, been owned by the famous horseracing and motorsport identity Dorothy Paget, and campaigned by the diminutive Bentley-driving Baronet, Sir Henry 'Tim' Birkin.

Birkin combined his "Bentley Boy" high-society image with a fearless driving talent and was the hero of a generation of British motor racing enthusiasts. "Tiger Tim's" militarily-moustachioed, be-goggled figure, in his neat wind cap, often with a polka-dot scarf fluttering in the slipstream, personified an English ideal. This so-British hero became the absolute epitome of Imperial power, speed and daring ... full story here .

64 | 1956 Ferrari 250 GT Competizione "Tour de France"

US$7,862,554 (Sold for £4,872,000)
September, 2014
London, U.K.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

65 | 1966 Ferrari 275 GTB/C


US$7,860,622 (Sold for €5,712,000)
May, 2014
Monte Carlo, Monaco
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

66 | 1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider

US$7,700,000
January, 2015
Scottsdale, Arizona, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

One of only 50 Long Wheelbase California Spiders ever built, this car is not a perfectly restored example of one of Ferrari's most sought-after models, but a car that was purchased 45 years ago by the late Jack Caster, and driven regularly until the well-known collector passed away. Castor also owned Elvis Presley's BMW 507.

In an article in Forza magazine, Jack said of the car, "I drive this car now far more than I did back when I first bought it. Most Cal Spiders are restored, perfect, and are trucked to shows. I like this one the way it is, so I don't have to worry about getting a scratch. I can just drive it and enjoy it."

Despite his relatively modest means, Jack Castor sold his VW Beetle in 1972 and took out a loan to buy the Ferrari for US$2950 (with shipping from Italy and import duties, it cost him $3,750) because he was so taken with the model.

Over the years, he happily rebuffed countless written and verbal offers to purchase the Ferrari. As letters arrived in his mailbox, promising ever-increasing sums of money in exchange for the California Spider, Jack politely dismissed each offer, telling hopeful suitors that he would prefer to drive and enjoy his car. The car never had a full restoration, and still wears the original paint and leather seats, giving it an irreplaceable patina.

67 | 1959 Bugatti Type 57S Cabriolet by Vanvooren

US$7,700,000
March, 2017
Amelia Island, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

68 | 1964 Ford GT40 Prototype

US$7,700,000
April, 2014
Houston, Texas, U.S.
Official Mecum Auction Page

One of the pioneering prototypes of the now-legendary GT40 juggernaut and one of the few that remains today, GT/104 is one of only two famously prepared and raced by Shelby American for the 1965 season.

One of the first race cars of any kind to benefit from computerised aerodynamic computation and the budding field of telemetry, it was crucial to the development of the GT40 into World Championship form, proving the project's potential at Le Mans, reaching the podium at Daytona and participating in Ford's first year in international competition. Its development involved such famous names as Lunn, Wyer and Shelby; it was driven by the top stars of the era at the world's most famous venues.

As the first ever 1965 Shelby American-specification GT40, chassis GT/104 is widely regarded as the most original and correct prototype Shelby American team car and possesses what Ronnie Spain has described as "one of the clearest provenances… of all GT40s."

69 | 1965 Shelby Daytona Cobra Coupe

US$7,685,000
The third most valuable movie car ever sold at auction
August, 2009
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Mecum Auction Page

Though this is one of the most valuable movie cars in history, it's a car with an impeccable race history and world championship in its own right that just happened to have also been used in a film – the immense price this car fetched at auction can almost entirely be attributed to its racing provenance.

This 1965 Shelby Daytona Cobra Coupe is one of Carroll Shelby's Daytona Cobras which was used to win the F.I.A. (Federation Internationale de l'Automobile) World Manufacturers Championship for GT cars in 1965.

Subsequent to the win, the car was leased to Paramount Pictures for use in director Howard Hawkes cult classic movie Redline 7000 (1965).

70 | 1962 Ferrari 400 Superamerica SWB Cabriolet

US$7,645,000
Fort Worth, Texas, U.S.
May, 2015
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

71 | 1939 Mercedes-Benz 540K Special Roadster

US$7,480,000
August, 2013
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

Mercedes-Benz's success with the 500K was aided by the continuing defaults of its sporting luxury competitors as the Great Depression worked its way through the ranks of society, politics, royalty, and finance. In 1936, the company followed up on that success with the 540K. Regarded by many and respected by all as the high point of the Classic Era among German automobiles, the 540K reflected the restless pursuit of perfection by Mercedes-Benz's engineers, technicians, and craftsmen, and by the coachbuilders of the Sindelfingen Werke.

The ultimate 540K was the Special Roadster. Constructed on a nearly 130-inch wheelbase chassis and stretching over 17.5 feet in overall length, it was a massive automobile in which to accommodate only two passengers. Yet, that awe-inspiring blend of cost-be-cursed size, performance, and style is what gave it a commanding presence that remains palpable in any surroundings. Better still, Hermann Ahrens and the Sindelfingen designers succeeded in so skillfully blending the car's styling elements that its overall proportions are harmonious.

This particular 540K has a fascinating history, having been driven in Germany until the war, then commandeered by a conquering Soviet General. In 1962, it was discovered in the Soviet Union by a Swedish newspaper reporter who then had to negotiate its purchase and repatriation to the West at the height of the Cold War.

It also has a history at auction, first auctioned during Monterey Car Week in 2011 by RM Auctions for US$4,620,000. It then went back on RM's auction block at Monterey in 2013, appreciating 62 percent in two years to sell for $7,480,000 in the sale which gives it this ranking. In Scottsdale 2017, the same car went to auction again, fetching $6,600,000. Read on ...

72 | 1929 Mercedes-Benz 38/250 SSK

US$7,427,010 (Sold for £4,181,500)
September, 2004
Goodwood, Sussex, U.K.
Official Bonhams Auction Page

George Milligen was a teenager when the British press began to carry prominent coverage of the S-series Mercedes-Benz models of the 1920s. Mercedes' competition successes were followed by advertisements which justifiably screamed, in capital letters, THE FASTEST SPORTS CAR IN THE WORLD.

In the advertising style of the period the adverts read: The many years of the Mercedes factory in the manufacture of Sports Cars, combined with their well-known workmanship and materials used, has enabled them to construct this super sports model. The Model possesses a high maximum speed, a power of acceleration which was considered unattainable hitherto, wonderful hill-climbing and the highest possible degree of reliability.

It has put up a number of records in the Sports Classes and in the 1927 German Grand Prix, against considerable international competition (it) obtained FIRST, SECOND & THIRD PLACES.

It would be fourteen years before George Milligen would get an opportunity to engage directly with a Mercedes-Benz of his own, but this car which Bonhams sold at Goodwood in 2004 for £4,181,500 (US$7,427,010) was the car Milligen purchased second-hand just prior to WWII – this 1929 7.1-litre Mercedes-Benz 38/250 Model SSK Short Wheelbase Two-Seat Sports Tourer. The full story is on the official auction page.

73 | 1952 Ferrari 212 Export Touring Barchetta

US$7,398,640 (Sold for €6,720,000)
May, 2015
Cernobbio, Lombardy, Italy
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

74 | 1912 Rolls-Royce 40/50hp Double Pullman Limousine

US$7,379,785 (Sold for £4,705,500)
June, 2012
Goodwood, Sussex, U.K.
Official Bonhams Auction Page

This 1912 Rolls-Royce 40/50hp Double Pullman Silver Ghost Limousine, is one of the most recognizable classic cars in the world, thanks to being chosen as a model for the Corgi Classics series of die-cast model cars.

It was created at a time when custom coachbuilders flourished – craftsmen of extraordinary skill made one-off automobile bodies for the the rich. The Pullman Limousine style is named after American Railway Car manufacturer George Pullman's luxurious and extravagant railway cars, so the intention from the beginning was to create a grand opulent vehicle.

It was built on the Silver Ghost chassis, which had been proclaimed by the highly influential Autocar magazine as "the best car in the world" just five years prior, by Barker & Co. of South Audley St., London and delivered new to John M. Stephens in South Croydon.

Stephens had previously purchased the first-ever Silver Ghost, and he was the first of a string of prominent collectors to own the car. Since WWII, the car has been part of several of the world's finest automobile collections, including those of John C. Sword, Denis de Ferranti, Richard Solove and John M. O'Quinn.

The car that Sports Car Market magazine once described as "a masterpiece of elephantine Edwardian elegance" was expected to fetch in excess of £2,000,000 when it went under the hammer in June, 2012, but eventually the bidding stopped at more than twice that amount – £4,705,500 (US$7,379,785). The image gallery for this car is truly breathtaking.

75 | 1904 Rolls-Royce 10 hp Two-Seater

US$7,274,290 (Sold for £3,251,500)
December, 2007
London, U.K.
Official Bonhams Auction Page

This car carries with it great historical significance, being the oldest known Rolls-Royce in the World. It was just the fourth car to carry the Rolls-Royce name and Barker coachbuilders were commissioned to build the Park Phaeton coachwork.

It was then driven to Southampton, shipped across the channel to Le Havre then driven to Paris where it was exhibited at the Salon de L'Automobile, an exhibition that ran from December 9–25, 1904. It was then exhibited at the Olympia Motor Exhibition in London in February 1905 on the Rolls-Royce stand.

76 | 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France'

US$7,273,054
September, 2015
London, U.K.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

77 | 1953 Ferrari 250 Mille Miglia Berlinetta

US$ 7,260,000
August, 2014
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Bonhams Auction Page

The Ferrari 250 Mille Miglia was tailor-made to compete in the marque long-distance races, using the new 3-liter V12 engine, a longer wheelbase chassis and the artistry of Carrozzeria Pinin Farina which created the two-seat closed-cabin bodywork. The new model was launched at the 1953 Geneva Salon as the Ferrari 250 MM (for Mille Miglia).

In May 1954, Road & Track tested a Ferrari 250 MM and recorded 0-60 mph (96.5 km/h) time of 5.1 seconds, and 0-100 mph (161 km/h) in 13.7. "Never before have I accelerated so rapidly, traveled so fast, or decelerated so suddenly," wrote R&T's Technical Editor.

The Ferrari 250 MM on offer is an outstanding example of Ferrari's first 3-liter V12-engined Gran Turismo family – launching the line that over the following decade would spawn the 250 Tour de France, 250 GT SWB and 250 GTO models. It was the 17th of 31 Ferrari 250 MMs to be built overall, and the 11th of the 250 MM Pinin Farina Berlinettas.

It was sold in America and the first race outing of the new Ferrari was the Sports Car Club of America San Francisco Region's 3rd Annual Members' Madera race meeting on September 20 that year. New owner Bill Devin finished third in the novice event before handing the car over to fast-rising Santa Monica driver Phil Hill, who won the main event of the day. Phil Hill would go on to win the Formula 1 Drivers' World Championship as a works Ferrari team member in 1961. Plenty of wonderful history with this car, which also includes Count Vittorio Zanon in its resume.

78 | 1959 Ferrari 250 LWB California Spider Competizione

US$7,260,000
August, 2010
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

An alloy 1959 Ferrari 250 LWB California Spider Competizione had some credible racing results including fifth outright in the 1960 12 Hours of Sebring and third outright at the 1960 Nassau TT. It was sold by Gooding & Co for US$7,260,000 at Pebble Beach 2010

79 | 1955 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione

US$7,150,000
August, 2013
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

This 1955 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione was one of the first 250 GT Competition cars. With coachwork by Pinin Farina, it was delivered new to legendary racing driver Alfonso de Portago and raced at the 1955 Nassau Speed Week.

A known, continuous ownership, the car participated in the Mille Miglia Storica 15 times between 1984 and 2013 and was completely restored and certified by the Ferrari Classiche Department. Matching numbers, and fully documented by Ferrari historian Marcel Massini.

80 | 1938 Talbot-Lago T150-C SS by Figoni et Falaschi

US$7,150,000
November, 2013
New York, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

More Art Deco mechanical artistry from French coachbuilders Figoni et Falaschi, though this car has the rare distinction of being the first Teardrop Cabriolet and the only short-wheelbase example with original chassis, engine, and body.

81 | 1959 Ferrari 250 GT SWB "Competition" Berlinetta Speciale

US$7,040,000
November, 2013
New York, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

In Ferrari's early days, many different coachbuilders constructed bodies on the company's chassis. Countless beautiful and vastly different motor cars were produced in this period, with each different to the next, to a greater or lesser degree.

Wealthy owners would specify precisely what they wanted during personal trips to the factory, frequently in direct conversation with Enzo Ferrari himself. It was not unlike having a bespoke suit constructed by a fine Italian tailor: one's personality, style, and preferences were all clearly visible in the finished product, as was the craftsmanship of the coachbuilder who brought the design to life.

Pinin Farina would eventually gain Enzo Ferrari's favour as a preferred design house and by the time of the 250 GT SWB, Pininfarina bodies had become the norm for Ferrari. Although there were detail differences from car to car, the 250 GT SWB had fundamentally become a standardized design.

There was still a demand for custom coachwork though, and six 250 GT SWB chassis were built with custom bodies – four by Pininfarina and two by Carrozzeria Bertone. This car (chassis 1739GT) is the first Bertone-bodied car and was once described by Auto d'Epoca magazine as "arguably the most spectacular and important of coach built Ferraris—combines classic Ferrari elements of sensuous form with a racing soul."

At Bertone, this chassis was graced with a one-off body that was designed by an individual who would become a hugely influential automotive designer, Giorgetto Giugiaro. At just 21-years-old, Giugiaro gave 1739GT a variety of unique exterior and interior options that would further distinguish it from other SWB models that were produced at the time.

Regardless of his youth, it was evident that Giugiaro had an eye for design, and the public's stunned reaction at the first glimpse of the car at the 1960 Geneva Salon clearly helped improve his stature in the industry. Giugiaro would go on to work at Ghia before founding his own firm, Italdesign Giugiaro, where he is credited with designing many notable sports cars, including the Iso Grifo, the BMW M1, and both the Maserati Ghibli and the Bora.

As with all cars of one-off coachwork, 1739GT enjoys fascinating provenance and was commissioned by Dottore Enrico Wax, one of the wealthiest men in Italy, and a personal friend of Enzo Ferrari.

The story behind the commissioning of 1739GT came from former Ferrari Vice President Amerigo Manicardi, who related that Wax had expressed interest in a speciale during a meeting with Enzo at the factory, if he would allow him one of the first short-wheelbase chassis that were then under construction. Both men walked to the Competition Department, where Enzo pointed to the first chassis in a line of just three. Enzo said that even though this specific chassis was earmarked as a Works team car, it would instead be immediately assigned to Wax's account.

According to Ferrari historian Stan Nowak, this is "possibly the one Ferrari that possesses all the criteria to contend for Best in Show at any major international concours, including Pebble Beach—one-off coachwork, influential design, debut at international salon, commissioned by prominent personality, built on special chassis, abundant brightwork, impeccable history."

82 | 1964 Ferrari 250 LM

US$7,014,433 (Sold for €4,510,000)
May, 2008
Maranello, Emilia-Romagna, Italy
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

An almost identical car to the 1964 Ferrari 250 LM which sold for US$14,300,000 in New York in November, 2013, and another sold for US$11,550,000 at Pebble Beach this year, so this car's price is more a reflection on how long ago it sold than its value today.

Though Enzo Ferrari tried hard in 1964 to convince the FIA that the new 250 LM was indeed just a variant of the 250 GTO which it replaced, and hence did not need to have 100 units produced for homologation purposes, no-one accepted the proposal. Even the car's name, which by all other Ferrari nomenclature rules should have been the 275 LM, is part of Ferrari's ruse.

As a result, the FIA refused the 250 LM homologation status and the cars were required to run in the much more competitive prototype classes. Nonetheless, their record is exceptional. In total, the 1964 cars would enter more than 50 races, winning more than a dozen of them outright – along with many other podium finishes. Notable examples included races at Snetterton, the Coppa Intereuropa, the Kyalami GP, and Elkhart Lake. Drivers notching victories in the LM included Roy Salvadori, Nino Vaccarelli, Willy Mairesse, and David Piper.

Only 32 of the 320 hp V-12 250 LMs were built, and the 250 LM will almost certainly go the same way as the GTO with ever appreciating value.

83 | 1965 Ford GT40 Roadster Prototype

US$6,930,000
August, 2014
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

Ford's GT40 dominated endurance racing in the mid sixties, but it was also considered as a roadster for public sale. This car is the first of six GT40 prototype roadsters built, the eighth of only 12 GT40 prototypes and the only roadster to remain in as-built condition. It was driven by Ken Miles, Carroll Shelby, Jim Clark, and other legends (see historic images on the official auction page).

Ronnie Spain, GT40 historian and author of GT 40: An Individual History and Race Record wrote: "GT/108 is one of the finest, and certainly rarest, examples of the Ford GT40 in existence. Its rarity value is stamped all over its history."

84 | 1962 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Speciale Aerodynamica

US$6,875,000
August, 2014
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Bonhams Auction Page

Ferrari's collaboration with Pininfarina on the Superfast theme created a new streamlined 250 GT car which was shown at the the 1960 Turin Salone dell'Automobile. The highly aerodynamic shape offered not just superb aerodynamics but an elegant new form factor. At the Geneva Salon of 1962 a Superfast III revision of the innovative, aerodynamic, high-performance limousine was unveiled, offering a more open 'greenhouse' cabin window treatment. A Superfast IV followed, but the design of Pininfarina's peerless 'Coupe Aerodinamica' would also be applied to only four, we believe, 250 GT Berlinettas with shorter 2.40-metre wheelbase – the Passo Corto or 250 GT SWB chassis length - of which this fine example is one. And it is from the Coupe Aerodinamica theme that the so-called GTO Prototype car was produced to compete at Le Mans in 1961, leading ultimately to the legendary Ferrari 250 GTO itself.

85 | 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Series 1 Cabriolet

US$6,820,000
August, 2014
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Bonhams Auction Page

This Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet S1 Pinin Farina is a very early example, being only the eighth of some 40 units built overall. Its chassis was delivered to the Pinin Farina plant on September 9, 1957, and upon its completion with this strikingly handsome body it was exhibited at the 39th Salone dell'Automobile in Turin from October 30-November 10 that year. After a well-documented life in South America, the 250 GT was acquired by Italian enthusiast Fabrizio Violati and inducted into his Collezione Maranello Rosso in San Marino.

86 | 1933 Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 Monza

US$6,710,000
August, 2010
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

87 | 1956 Ferrari 250 GT LWB Berlinetta 'Tour de France'


The fourth most valuable movie car ever sold at auction
US$6,710,000
August, 2012
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

This 1956 Ferrari 250 GT LWB Berlinetta is unofficially known as the "Tour de France" model thanks to it winning the 1956 running of the legendary French (now defunct) public roads sports car race.

Ferrari had shown its new series-production 250 GT at the Geneva Motor Show of 1956. While the coupe on display featured an elegant body that would go on to be produced in quantity by Boano, thus providing necessary homologation, the underlying chassis proved to be the basis for the competition car, or berlinetta, that Ferrari sought to enter into the FIA's new GT racing classifications.

Pininfarina designed a new lightweight body that was built by Scaglietti, using thin-gauge aluminium and Perspex windows and a minimally upholstered cabin. The finished car, then known officially as the 250 GT Berlinetta, was ultimately made in a sparing quantity of 77 examples that are further sub-divided by subtle differences in coachwork over the model's four-year production run.

The Berlinetta was immediately successful, when Olivier Gendebien and Jacques Washer co-drove the very first car to a First in Class and Fourth Overall at the Giro di Sicilia in April 1956, with fifth Overall (and first in class) at the Mille Miglia later that month.

The model's defining success occurred in September, when Marquis Alfonso de Portago, a Spanish aristocrat and privateer racer, drove one to a dominating victory in the 1956 Tour de France Automobile, a result that sealed the model's reputation. The 1956 Tour de France Automobile covered 3,600 miles over a week which included six different circuit races, two hill climbs, and a drag race. Enzo Ferrari was so pleased with the outcome that the 250 GT Berlinetta was subsequently and internally, though never officially, referred to as the Tour de France.

The Berlinetta wore the name well, also winning the 1957, 1958, and 1959 installments of the French race in the hands of Olivier Gendebien, as well as a Third Overall at the 1957 Mille Miglia.

This particular unit is the very first example constructed of the second series design that featured 14-louver sail-panels, and was initially purchased by Southern California building construction magnate Tony Parravano who found that the American sanctioning body did not recognize it as a production car. The car subsequently changed hands before eventually being purchased by Walt Disney Studios for use in the 1966 film The Love Bug, the celebrated Disney classic about "Herbie," the racing VW Beetle with a soul. Carandmotors has some images of the Berlinetta during its cinematic career.

The Ferrari subsequently fell on hard times, and quite remarkably for a car now in the 100 most valuable in the world, was reportedly abandoned on the Hollywood Freeway at one stage during the seventies. Redemption eventually came, and the story can be read in great detail on the official RM Auctions page.

88 | 1939 Delahaye 135 Competition Court Torpedo Roadster

US$6,600,000
March, 2014
Amelia Island, Florida, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

Delahaye built just 30 cars using the Competition Court chassis and only two short wheelbase variants are known to have survived to this day – this car is one of them.

It's pedigree is far grander however, as it wears a body tag verifying the involvement of famous stylist and illustrator Georges Hamel (Geo Ham) in its styling.

The design for the Torpedo Roadster that clothes the chassis is based on the famed 1936 Paris Auto Show car, traditionally recognized as a collaboration between Figoni and the illustrator. The body was subsequently built by Figoni's equally famous Carrosier, Figoni & Falaschi and hence we have a gorgeous motor car sitting atop a competition chassis and engine – a street version of the purely competition Type 135 S.

89 | 1957 Ferrari 250 GT California LWB Prototype Spider

US$6,600,000
August, 2012
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

This car carries some extraordinary history. It is the original Ferrari 250 GT California Spider prototype, a car which launched one of the most iconic series of sports cars in history.

As the prototype California Spider, it has many unique one-off features that never carried over into any of the production models, but it was nonetheless, the car which appeared in the brochures and publicity of the soon-to-be-released California in early 1958.

90 | 1957 Ferrari 625 TRC Spider


US$6,511,207 (Sold for €5,040,000)
May, 2012
Monte Carlo, Monaco
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

One of only two factory-built 625 TRCs ever built, this 1957 Ferrari 625 TRC Spider was sold with a fully documented provenance by RM Auctions in Monaco in May, 2012 for EUR 5,040,000 (US$6,511,207). It was purchased new by famed racing driver and pioneering American Ferrari importer, John von Neumann and has been successful in both period and vintage racing history, with a history including such luminaries as Richie Ginther.

92 | 1931 Bugatti Royale Berline de Voyager

US$6,500,000
June, 1986
Reno, Nevada, U.S.
Auctioned by Kruse International (purchased by RM Auctions in 2010)

The Bugatti Type 41 was one of the most luxurious and immense cars ever produced. Designed by Jean Bugatti, only a handful (different sources claim 6, 7 and 8 in total) were produced. The second Bugatti Royale in the list belonged to Bill Harrah – the owner of a 1,400 strong car collection. It was sold in 1986 in Reno, USA during an event called "Evening Royale."

92 | 1950 Ferrari 166 MM/195 S Berlinetta Le Mans

US$6,490,000
January, 2016
Scottsdale, Arizona, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

93 | 1959 Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet

US$6,473,454 (Sold for €4,704,000)
May, 2014
Monte Carlo, Monaco
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

94 | 1960 Ferrari 400 Superamerica SWB Cabriolet

US$6,380,000
March, 2015
Amelia Isand, Florida, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

95 | 1955 Ferrari 857 Sport

US$6,270,000
August, 2012
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

This 1955 Ferrari 857 Sport is one of four 857 Sports produced and as the price suggests, it ticks all the boxes. It is a matching-numbers, original-bodied (with one-off Scaglietti coachwork) factory racing Ferrari with a distinguished race history that includes being driven by Carroll Shelby, Jack McAfee, Olivier Gendebien, Richie Ginther and Masten Gregory.

96 | 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Series 1

US$6,160,000
January, 2014
Scottsdale, Arizona, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

97 | 1961 Ferrari 250 SWB Competizione SEFAC Hot Rod

US$6,105,000
August, 2010
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

This Ferrari Classiche-certified, matching-numbers 1961 Ferrari 250 SWB Competizione SEFAC Hot Rod underwent a two-year restoration at the Ferrari factory prior to selling for US$6,105,000 at Pebble Beach in 2010. One of only 20 SEFAC Hot Rods built, it was raced by Trintignant, Hill, Bonnier and Gendebien.

98 | 1928 Bentley 4 Litre Le Mans Sports 'Bobtail'

US$6,050,000
August, 2012
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Gooding & Co Auction Page

Of all the legendary drivers and machines to compete at the world's premiere endurance event, there is no legacy greater than that of the Bentley Boys and their five outright Le Mans victories. The small number of works team cars that remain, such as this 11928 Bentley 4 1/2 Litre Vanden Plas Le Mans Sports "Bobtail," are the most sought-after of all Bentleys in existence.

This car, YW 2557, is one of the few purpose-built 4 1/2 Litre Le Mans team cars and the only remaining example in Bobtail form. It was completed in 1928 for the 24 Hours of Le Mans, which ended up being a victorious race for the marque. In 1929, this team car competed in the inaugural Double Twelve race at Brooklands, placing second overall against an Alfa-Romeo with a generous handicap. Primed for success, the Bentley Boys continued their winning campaign at Le Mans later that year, where they gloriously crossed the finish line 1, 2, 3 and 4. This Bobtail placed third overall with J. Dudley Benjafield and Baron Andre d'Erlanger at the wheel, resulting in the car's second podium position out of three 24-hour events in its racing career.

In keeping with its originality, the Bobtail was restored to its 1929 Le Mans specification in recent years, and therefore remains as one of the purest and most important Bentleys in the world.

99 | 2005 Enzo Ferrari

US$6,050,000
August, 2015
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

100 | 1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider

US$5,907,325 (Sold for €4,507,104)
February, 2012
Paris, France
Official Artcurial Auction Page

The California Spider is one of the rarest and most sought after Ferraris in the world. We have documented more than a dozen such Spiders while curating this list, but this one probably has the most storied existence. Apart from full history and matching numbers and covered headlights, it was owned and driven across the South of France by one of the world's most famous playboys, noted screenwriter, film director/producer, author and actor Roger Vadim.

Vadim was married five times (his wives included Brigitte Bardot and Jane Fonda) but was known for his extracurricular and high profile romances. Urbandaddy has some pics of Vadim with this Ferrari and budding 17-year-old actress Catherine Deneuve, who also went on to become one of the greats of the silver screen.

In a country where philandering is regarded as a high art form, it's not surprising that this car was sold by one of the world's leading art auction houses, Artcurial.

Close but no cigar ... When we first started publishing this top 100 listing, a price with a 3 at the front would warrant inclusion. Now, that number will soon be a 6. These are the cars which narrowly missed a spot in the current listing, some displaced by newer sales, and some just missing the cut

101 | 1972 Porsche 917/10

US$5,830,000
August, 2012
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Mecum Auction Page

The instantly recognizable L&M-sponsored; Team Penske Porsche 917 which dominated the 1972 Can-Am series with its 5.4L Twin Turbo 12 cylinder engine and one of the most frightening power-to-weight ratios ever assembled between four wheels - capable of over 1150 horsepower, and running 0-100 mph in 2.9 seconds. This car was driven by racing legends Mark Donohue and George Follmer, it reappeared in 1973 wearing Rinzier RC Cola livery and placed second in the series.

A true icon for automotive racing history directly related to the car which gave Porsche its first Le Mans win and World Sportscar Championship.

102 – 1953 Ferrari 340/375 MM Berlinetta Competizione

US$5,721,697 (Sold for €4,235,000)
May, 2007
Maranello, Emilia-Romagna, Italy
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

A sister car to the world's fastest road car which sits higher on this listing, this 1953 Ferrari 340/375 MM Berlinetta Competizione sold for EUR4,235,000 (US$5,721,697) in 2007 and would fetch much more in today's climate.

The ex-factory Ferrari was driven by the likes of Paul and Giannino Marzotto, Umberto Maglioli, Piero Carini, Luigi Vileresi, Nino Flour and Mike Hawthorn, and finished fifth at Le Mans, before winning the 24 Hours of Spa. The official auction page has an extensive history of the car.

103 | 1956 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France'

US$5,720,000
August, 2016
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

104 | 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet


US$5,720,000
December, 2015
New York, U.S.
Official RM-Sotheby's Auction Page

105 | 1930 Bentley Speed Six Tourer

US$5,658,536 (Sold for €4,188,250)
July, 2004
Le Mans, Sarthe, France
Official Christies Auction Page

A very significant racing Bentley with some of the greatest Bentley Boy names in its provenance. This is the Works No. 2 Bentley Speed Six Tourer from 1930.

This magnificent car came second in the Le Mans 24 Hour race in 1930 when piloted by Clement and Watney, and was also winner of the 'Double Twelve', the equivalent British Endurance race. That's it crossing the line at Le Mans in 1-2 formation below.

Since this sale a decade ago, the car has regularly appeared around the continent, delighting crowds wherever it goes.

106 – 1966 Ferrari 330 P3

US$5,616,000
August, 2000
Monterey, California, U.S.
Official Christies Auction Page

Motor racing's golden era between the years of 1964 and 1971 was the era of the no-holds barred big displacement sports-prototypes in World Championship sports car racing for the Manufacturers' Championship.

It was the time of such legendary race cars as the Ford GT40, the Lola T70, the Ferrari 512S and M, the Porsche 917 and, perhaps the greatest of all, the Ferrari "P" (for "prototipo") series.

This Ferrari 330 P3 is one of only three factory prototypes built. It runs a 3,967 cc V12, (with double overhead camshafts on each bank and twin spark plug per cylinder), and produces 420 bhp at 8,200 rpm.

This car was driven by the likes of Jean Guichet, John Surtees, Bob Bondurant, Pedro Rodriguez, Mike Parkes, Lodovico Scarfiotti, Lorenzo Bandini, and Giancarlo Baghetti in its day and has a long and fascinating history since its days battling the GT40.

It recorded wins in the 1000kms races at Monza and Spa along with its third place finish in the famous Daytona 1967 Ferrari 1-2-3 triumph.

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