Automotive

Corbellati puts jewelry expertise to work ... building the world's fastest car

Corbellati puts jewelry expert...
Those full, rollercoaster fenders remind us of 1960s race/road cars
Those full, rollercoaster fenders remind us of 1960s race/road cars
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Corbellati Missile teaser picture
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Corbellati Missile teaser picture
Those full, rollercoaster fenders remind us of 1960s race/road cars
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Those full, rollercoaster fenders remind us of 1960s race/road cars
Corbellati teases its 1,800-hp Missile supercar ahead of a March debut
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Corbellati teases its 1,800-hp Missile supercar ahead of a March debut
Corbellati thinks its work will result in a top speed over 300 mph
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Corbellati thinks its work will result in a top speed over 300 mph
Corbellati Missile
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Corbellati Missile

The name "Corbellati" definitely doesn't seduce the eardrum like a "Ferrari" or "Bugatti." Before teasing the could-be world's fastest car, it was better known as the surname of a family of jewelry makers and artists. This family's latest creation is much more a living creature than its past work, though – a retro-styled supercar with a grumbling 9.0-liter V8 beating heart. Corbellati will reveal the "Missile" at the upcoming Geneva Motor Show and perhaps go on to challenge the Koenigsegg Agera RS for the world speed record.

We're not quite sure what to make of Corbellati – it's an odd one. Usually when a complete unknown surfaces to reveal an inconceivable hypercar drenched in superlatives, it introduces itself by focusing on its team's automotive and design expertise.

Corbellati, on the other hand, says, "We are the Corbellati family, for 70 years creators of jewels, artists, art enthusiasts. Today, the last generation, passionate to the sports cars, has embarked on a new venture full of challenges to continue in the name of family tradition. Our goal is to create a car with unique performance and unique design, just like a jewel."

OK then.

However questionable its background, Corbellati intends to host its world premiere in March at the Geneva show, where the Missile will find itself but one among a fleet of the world's most powerful, beautiful supercars, some with more legitimate and believable claims of being the world's fastest.

Corbellati Missile
Corbellati Missile

But Corbellati has no intention of bringing a knife to a gunfight. According to the details the company has released so far, the Missile is powered by an 1,800-hp 9.0-liter V8 biturbo driving the rear wheels through a 6-speed transmission and limited slip differential. The engine also develops 1,733 lb-ft.

The 184-in (4,670-mm) Missile stands 46 in (1,170 mm) to the roof and 4.7 in (12 cm) over the ground below. A carbon fiber chassis and bodywork help to keep weight down, while exaggerated curves reminiscent of the race cars of the 1960s are structured to help the car slip its way to a (crazy-optimistic) estimated top speed above 310 mph (500 km/h). A self-leveling double quadrilateral air suspension fine-tunes and cushions the ride, and carbon-ceramic discs inside monoblock six-piston calipers bring that ride to a reliable stop.

An 1,800-hp car built by jewelers being the first to break the 300-mph and 500-km/h barriers definitely sounds like a complete fantasy, and on most days, we would probably dismiss it all together. But today, Corbellati held our attention, mostly out of curiosity of what this unknown entity will be showing in just a few weeks' time in Geneva. We're definitely looking forward to getting a closer look.

Corbellati teases its 1,800-hp Missile supercar ahead of a March debut
Corbellati teases its 1,800-hp Missile supercar ahead of a March debut

After hosting the Missile's world premiere in Geneva, Corbellati will also bring it to Top Marques Monaco in April. Whether or not the car will ever make good on its "world's fastest" bill remains to be seen. It faces some stiff competition from much more established players, though, with ink barely dry on Koenigsegg's production car speed record, and folks at Bugatti and Hennessey undoubtedly itching to run their own attempt.

We'll bring more details of the Corbellati Missile after its official debut.

Source: Corbellati

7 comments
WilliamSager
Somebody is going to need a massive amount more of down force if they think they are going to get that car even to 250mph.
JimFox
Just what the World does NOT need.
MatthiasPaschke
Looks very similar to an east german sports car Melkus RS 2000. An advice: The former GDR (German Demokratic Republic) had a very small sports car company Melkus which produced good looking sports vehicles since 1969.
Stephen Colbourne
To get maximum speed, down force is not required. If grip is a problem and you have a long enough track to get to speed , the best approach is to add ballast. I would recommend they drop the roof line for the record attempt (maybe employing a very short driver) to further reduce drag. Down force adds alot of drag at high speed, and is why cars like the Bugatti have variable down force according to conditions. Weight adds little resistance but will slow acceleration, for the same increased grip.
Expanded Viewpoint
What an incredibly GORGEOUS! piece of rolling stock!! That svelte look with those swooping curves in all the right places just exude more sexiness than I've ever seen in a car before! It just takes my breath away, and I'd love to cover my walls with some large sized photos of it. But it would undoubtedly make my girlfriend VERY jealous indeed! Why no data on the mechanical aspects, such as the power plant, transaxle and brakes?? Is it a from the ground up engine, or one that is already in production from another marque? Randy
Gregg Eshelman
Unlike most of the other supercars ever built, this one seems designed to slip gently through the air VS slicing and battering its way through using sharp edges and flat or nearly flat planes. Achieving a laminar flow from front to rear, with a clean break off the tail edge, should produce the lowest drag.
Mayakovski
Bella, truly Bella. The most attractive supercar I have seen since the Lamborghini Miura.