Aircraft

Bombardier expands Challenger family with 3500 mid-size business jet

Bombardier expands Challenger ...
Artist's concept of the Challenger 3500
Artist's concept of the Challenger 3500
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The flight deck of the Challenger 3500
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The flight deck of the Challenger 3500
The Challenger 3500 is based on the 300 series
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The Challenger 3500 is based on the 300 series
A Nuage seat
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A Nuage seat
The Challenger 3500 can carry up to
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The Challenger 3500 can carry up to 10 passengers
Artist's concept of the Challenger 3500
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Artist's concept of the Challenger 3500
The Challenger 3500 cabin
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The Challenger 3500 cabin
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Aerospace company Bombardier has rolled out its new Challenger 3500 midsize business jet. Based on the Challenger 300 family, the intercontinental aircraft was unveiled last week in Montreal in a worldwide virtual launch.

Introduced into the market in 2004, the 300 series in its original 300 and 350 variants has sold about 900 units. Borrowing some features from the Bombardier Galaxy Global 7500, the Challenger 3500 mixes these with the base of the 350 design.

With a wingspan of 69 feet (21 m) and a length of over 68 feet (20 m), the 3500 has the same dimensions as the 350, and the same pair of Honeywell HTF7350 turbofans punching 7,323 lb of thrust. Operating at an altitude of 43,000 ft (13,106 m), it has a cruising speed of Mach 0.80 and a range of 3,400 nm (3,900 miles, 6,300 km).

According to Bombardier, the newly designed cabin can carry up to 10 passengers in standard configuration, though a variant with a three-seat divan is also available. The seating features the company's Nuage seat for the first time in the midsize market, featuring a tilt-link system, a floating base, and a tilting headrest for full ergonomic support.

The Challenger 3500 cabin
The Challenger 3500 cabin

The cabin also boasts improved soundproofing and the cabin altitude pressure has been enhanced to that of 4,850 feet (1,478 m) at cruising altitude. It also introduces an industry first with voice controls for the lighting, temperature, and entertainment systems, the lattermost of which includes the only 24-inch, 4K video display in its class.

On the flight deck, the 3500 comes with a standard auto-throttle system, an advanced avionics suite with four large displays, a Dual Flight Management System with Localizer Performance with Vertical guidance (LPV) and Required Navigation Performance (RNP) approach capabilities. There's also a Synthetic Vision System (SVS), MultiScan weather radar, a Dual Inertial Reference System (IRS), Dual SBAS/WAAS GPS navigation system, and an optional Head-up Display (HUD) with Enhanced Vision System(EVS). Smart Link Plus, which automatically sends takeoff, landing and in-flight fault notifications to the maintenance crews, is also included.

"We are thrilled to launch a business jet that features all the best-selling elements of the Challenger platform – impressive performance, consistent reliability, exceptional smooth ride – while elevating the cabin experience for our customers," says Éric Martel, President and Chief Executive Officer, Bombardier. "Building on the success of the unrivaled Global 7500 business jet cabin, the Challenger 3500 aircraft prioritizes what our customers value most: a truly exceptional cabin experience."

The Challenger 3500 will enter service next year. If you're in the market, one will set you back a cool US$26.7 million for the base aircraft.

The video below introduces the Challenger 3500.

Challenger 3500

Source: Bombardier

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1 comment
1 comment
Nelson Hyde Chick
The biggest driver of climate change is the production of energy, which is why energy should be priced progressively. The topping-off the tank of his Prius to commute to work each day to put food on his family's table should be paying a fraction per gallon as the guy topping-off the tank of his private jet. The energy gluttons should be paying more for their selfish ways.