Architecture

UK architects transform apartment using pods instead of walls

UK architects transform apartm...
The Biscuit Factory apartment utilizes a series of inhabitable pods made from birch and plywood
The Biscuit Factory apartment utilizes a series of inhabitable pods made from birch and plywood
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The pods make up the kitchen, living area, bedrooms, walk-in wardrobe, bathroom and study area
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The pods make up the kitchen, living area, bedrooms, walk-in wardrobe, bathroom and study area
The Biscuit Factory apartment utilizes a series of inhabitable pods made from birch and plywood
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The Biscuit Factory apartment utilizes a series of inhabitable pods made from birch and plywood
Exterior of the Biscuit Factory apartment in East London
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Exterior of the Biscuit Factory apartment in East London
The bespoke pods start to get built
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The bespoke pods start to get built
The renovations begin
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The renovations begin
Cool gray tiling and warm timber floors work well together in the home
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Cool gray tiling and warm timber floors work well together in the home
The specially designed pods are used to divide the apartment into its different zones
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The specially designed pods are used to divide the apartment into its different zones
Modern bathroom with cool gray tiling
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Modern bathroom with cool gray tiling

The pods incorporate an impressive 9 sq m (97 sq ft) of storage space
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The pods incorporate an impressive 9 sq m (97 sq ft) of storage space
Exposed brick work is contrasted by the warm lines of the birch pods and clean white walls
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Exposed brick work is contrasted by the warm lines of the birch pods and clean white walls
Rustic features brings warmth and character to the home
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Rustic features brings warmth and character to the home
Occupants can retreat to their own space, without feeling closed in
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Occupants can retreat to their own space, without feeling closed in
The use of pods meant the architects could take full advantage of the home's 3.5-m-high ceilings by creating an elevated mezzanine level
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The use of pods meant the architects could take full advantage of the home's 3.5-m-high ceilings by creating an elevated mezzanine level
The Biscuit Factory home also features beautiful timber flooring, an abundance of natural light
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The Biscuit Factory home also features beautiful timber flooring, an abundance of natural light entering the large over-sized factory windows, and a modern bathroom with cool gray tiling
The steps are also used to hide additional storage space
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The steps are also used to hide additional storage space
The steps, which give access to the mezzanine, have been painted in bright yellow, adding a playful touch to the home
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The steps, which give access to the mezzanine, have been painted in bright yellow, adding a playful touch to the home
As an additional aesthetic consideration the architects chose to enhance the home's biscuit factory features by exposing the original brick work
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As an additional aesthetic consideration the architects chose to enhance the home's biscuit factory features by exposing the original brick work
London-based architectural studio Suprblk has transformed an apartment inside an old biscuit factory by incorporating bespoke pods instead of walls
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London-based architectural studio Suprblk has transformed an apartment inside an old biscuit factory by incorporating bespoke pods instead of walls

London based architectural studio Suprblk has transformed an apartment inside an old biscuit factory by incorporating bespoke pods instead of walls. The smart space-saving design means the occupants can now enjoy an additional 20 sq m (215 sq ft) of living space, increasing the overall interior from 60 sq m (646 sq ft) to 81 sq m (872 sq ft).

Located in East London, the "The Biscuit Factory" apartment utilizes a series of "inhabitable pods" made from birch and plywood. The specially designed pods are used to divide the apartment into its different zones, including the kitchen, living area, bedrooms, walk-in wardrobe, bathroom and study area. The pods also incorporate an impressive 9 sq m (97 sq ft) of storage space, a big plus for small living.

The use of pods meant the architects could take full advantage of the home's 3.5-m-high ceilings by creating an elevated mezzanine level
The use of pods meant the architects could take full advantage of the home's 3.5-m-high ceilings by creating an elevated mezzanine level

“These pods, set back from the south facing factory windows and newly revealed glazed brick columns, behave as large pieces of furniture within the space,” says Suprblk. "By building in an abundance of storage, something which is so often lacking in small residential spaces. The minimal and light, airy feeling within the space is easily achieved."

The use of pods meant the architects could take full advantage of the home's 3.5-m-high (11.5-ft) ceilings by creating an elevated mezzanine level, which houses a work space and second bedroom. The clever use of of the home's high ceilings juxtaposed with the height of the pods, gives the impression of more space overall, while also providing privacy in the various quarters throughout the home. This aspect allows the occupants to retreat to their own space, without feeling closed in. This is especially evident within the elevated mezzanine rooms, which look out across the rest of the apartment without compromising one's sense of privacy.

"The elevated nature of the office also enables creative mess to exist without being seen, which further helps with the minimal aesthetic," says Suprblk.

As an additional aesthetic consideration the architects chose to enhance the home's biscuit factory features by exposing the original brick work
As an additional aesthetic consideration the architects chose to enhance the home's biscuit factory features by exposing the original brick work

As an additional aesthetic consideration the architects chose to enhance the home's biscuit factory features by exposing the original brick work. This is contrasted by the warm lines of the birch pods and clean white walls. The steps, which give access to the mezzanine, have been painted in bright yellow, adding a playful touch to the home. The steps are also used to hide additional storage space.

The Biscuit Factory home also features beautiful timber flooring, an abundance of natural light entering the large over-sized factory windows, and a modern bathroom with cool gray tiling.

The Biscuit Factory apartment was shortlisted in the 2019 Dezeen Awards.

Source: Suprblk via Dezeen

2 comments
Brian M
Not exactly a lot of private personal space if more than 1 person living there - At least they stopped short of making the bathroom open plan!
paul314
I've yo're trying to get two usable levels out of 3.5M, this will likely work best for short people.