Architecture

Designer of Europe's tallest skyscraper reveals new twisting towers

Designer of Europe's tallest s...
There's no word yet as to when the Xiangjiang Gate is due to begin construction
There's no word yet as to when the Xiangjiang Gate is due to begin construction
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There's no word yet as to when the Xiangjiang Gate is due to begin construction
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There's no word yet as to when the Xiangjiang Gate is due to begin construction
The Xiangjiang Gate will reach a maximum height of 177 m (580 ft)
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The Xiangjiang Gate will reach a maximum height of 177 m (580 ft)
The Xiangjiang Gate will be located in Hunan, China
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The Xiangjiang Gate will be located in Hunan, China
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RMJM, which is the firm behind the design of Europe's current tallest skyscraper, the Lakhta Center, in St. Petersburg, Russia, was recently chosen to create an unusual project in Hunan, China. The Xiangjiang Gate will rise to a maximum height of 177 m (580 ft) and consists of two twisting towers that join together near their center.

RMJM's vision for the Xiangjiang Gate was chosen following an architecture competition and, once complete, will serve as a monument with a panoramic viewing platform and a tourist information center.

The project will comprise two separate parts that come together and twist as they rise (the renders also appear to show glazing joining the two near the top). Its inspiration is rather complex and best put in the firm's own words.

"The concept behind the design is deeply rooted in the history of the city," says RMJM. "The design pays tribute to the geographical location of the city but also to its convergent spirit. Hangyang is a city where old and new, culture and modernity, converge in many aspects. The joint towers represent the essence of humanity: fire. Hengyang is a city of ancient history. In religious tradition, it is said that Hengyang was the first to bear the mark of Zhu Rong, the God of Fire and South, whose story is contained in 'Shan Hai Jing · Great Wild West'. Viewed upside down, the building becomes a goose flying through the sky. In ancient Chinese poetry, Hangyang was a winter refuge for wild geese escaping the cold of the north, earning it the nickname of the Wild Goose City."

The Xiangjiang Gate will be located in Hunan, China
The Xiangjiang Gate will be located in Hunan, China

Details are light at this early stage but the Global Construction Review reports that the project is part of a larger development that will also include an office space, housing, amusement park and commercial units.

There's no word yet on when the project is expected to be completed.

Source: RMJM

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8 comments
paul314
Does the structure actually do that twisty thing internally, or is the curvy stuff mostly decorative?
Dr. Hujjatullah M.H.B. Sahib
That is truely an impressive structure with square uneven heads. From different angles it may resemble a Chinese character. Anyway does it also come with helipads on the tops ?
BlueOak
Dramatic? Sure.

But these buildings that play visual tricks that seem to be counter to natural physics and balance (top-heavy tower top tower pods over visually thinner riser) might not be timeless and naturally beautiful.

This might be the Architects’ onanistic expression to win the bid - to the exclusion of true design beauty.
ljaques
Finally, something truly beautiful from a modern architecture firm! I'll bet it twists inside, too, rather than waste 30 % of its space. I'd wager that it has helipads on the flat roofs, perhaps built over the HVAC, elevator motion control, and water pumps on top. Rather than a fire, I was immediately reminded of an octopus.
buzzclick
As an artist I'm preoccupied with the aesthetics first. There is nothing about fire or geese that I can see in this concept. This is the kind of design that doesn't age well. I hope that common sense prevails and it NEVER gets built.
Worzel
Another architects fantasy/statement and an engineers nightmare. Architects draw the pretty pictures, and engineers have to try to build them. Making a structure that shape both Earthquake proof, and hurricane/tornado resistant will be almost impossible. Even a light wind could be a disaster, if it happens to reach resonance, and anyone in the building is likely to find the movement somewhat sickening. as to looking 'like a goose flying through the sky,' again,......only in an architects fantasy. It looks like no goose I've ever seen. Maybe the only 'goose' is the one 'footing the bill.'
neoneuron
Wait till the elevators get jammed. I'd like to see the price of replacing a window or outside tile.. If they didn't make the center of the building hollow like trees do, it might have had a chance. Good luck with it..
Boon-cheng Tan
C n S engineers. Thks.