Architecture

Green-roof family home vanishes into the landscape

Green-roof family home vanishe...
Dutch architectural firm Studio Okami has recently completed a green roof home that vanishes into its natural landscape setting
Dutch architectural firm Studio Okami has recently completed a green roof home that vanishes into its natural landscape setting
View 16 Images
Dutch architectural firm Studio Okami has recently completed a green roof home that vanishes into its natural landscape setting
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Dutch architectural firm Studio Okami has recently completed a green roof home that vanishes into its natural landscape setting
The three-bedroom family home is built into the sloping hillside
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The three-bedroom family home is built into the sloping hillside
Sloped Villa boasts a large exposed-brick exterior terrace
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Sloped Villa boasts a large exposed-brick exterior terrace
The contemporary family home uses reclaimed-bricks
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The contemporary family home uses reclaimed-bricks
Studio Okami came up with an “invisible house” design, which saw the home built into the sloped terrain
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Studio Okami came up with an “invisible house” design, which saw the home built into the sloped terrain
A contemporary family home that boasts a green roof and unrestricted views across the vast landscape
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A contemporary family home that boasts a green roof and unrestricted views across the vast landscape
Twin exterior brick staircases, which are located at either side of the dwelling, provide access to the home
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Twin exterior brick staircases, which are located at either side of the dwelling, provide access to the home
The three-bedroom single level home features a large open lounge area with floor-to-ceiling glass windows
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The three-bedroom single level home features a large open lounge area with floor-to-ceiling glass windows
The central living quarters have a simple interior aesthetic with natural tones
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The central living quarters have a simple interior aesthetic with natural tones
Sloped Villa features a simple interior with a collection of raw-concrete structural pillars
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Sloped Villa features a simple interior with a collection of raw-concrete structural pillars
An internal garden is strategically placed at the core of the home
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An internal garden is strategically placed at the core of the home
The internal garden provides the “cave-like” bedrooms with light and air
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The internal garden provides the “cave-like” bedrooms with light and air
The master bedroom looks out onto the internal garden
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The master bedroom looks out onto the internal garden
Sloped Villa floor-plan by Studio Okami
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Sloped Villa floor-plan by Studio Okami
The home's green roof renders the home invisible from street level
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The home's green roof renders the home invisible from street level
Sloped Villa during construction
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Sloped Villa during construction
View gallery - 16 images

Dutch architectural firm Studio Okami has recently completed a green roof home that, from a certain angle, vanishes into its natural landscape setting. Dubbed Sloped Villa, the three-bedroom family home is built into the sloping hillside of Mont-de-l'Enclus in Belgium.

Straying from traditional building methods and regulations in the region, the architects spent two years pushing the project through the city council for approval. In an effort to create a modern home that would capture the stunning and vast views, the architects were able to side-step building regulations for things like sloped roofing and predefined window sizes.

The three-bedroom family home is built into the sloping hillside
The three-bedroom family home is built into the sloping hillside

Studio Okami came up with an “invisible house” design, which saw the green-roofed home built into the sloped terrain. The result is a contemporary family home that boasts the use of reclaimed-bricks, large open interior spaces and unrestricted views across the vast landscape.

A contemporary family home that boasts a green roof and unrestricted views across the vast landscape
A contemporary family home that boasts a green roof and unrestricted views across the vast landscape

“By using the sloped terrain to hide the project, the city council was convinced to step away from the traditional regulations, allowing the client his dream for infinite views over the valley,” says the studio. “Within the building precinct the terrain was elevated, folded open, to allow for a 273 sq m [2,938.5 sq ft] single floor villa to be hidden in plain sight.”

The three-bedroom single level home features a large open lounge area, modern kitchen and dinning area as the home's centerpieces. The central living quarters have a simple interior aesthetic with natural tones, a collection of raw-concrete structural pillars, floor-to-ceiling glass windows, timber flooring and interior cladding, wood burning fireplace and a large exposed-brick exterior terrace.

The three-bedroom single level home features a large open lounge area with floor-to-ceiling glass windows
The three-bedroom single level home features a large open lounge area with floor-to-ceiling glass windows

An internal garden is strategically placed at the core of the home, allowing natural light to fill the interior spaces, while also providing good airflow and light to the “cave-like” bedrooms that are located towards the rear of the home.

The internal garden provides the “cave-like” bedrooms with light and air
The internal garden provides the “cave-like” bedrooms with light and air

Exterior brick staircases, which are located at either side of the dwelling, provide access to the home. Meanwhile the green roof renders the home invisible from street level, as it melts into its surroundings.

Source: Studio Okami via Archdaily

View gallery - 16 images
5 comments
Matty E.
What a lost opportunity! Good concept - but instead of something warm and human, they built an ugly, drab, brick and concrete box. It would have taken so little extra effort to make it a welcoming space. Instead it looks like a dirty mausoleum.
ei3io
I thought it would hide it-self from the open view side, but no, when looking at it suposedly "hidden" in the landscape we see a bright high contrast heavy brick box lattice. So, not until all that view facing brick is covered by ivy will it be a complete success. This is an important design consideration as pressure builds to cover the public's realm of common view inspiration of skylines with beautiful rolling hills with ugly bright color boxes, then we all lose a better future.
Douglas Rogers
I wouldn't worry about there being a lot of these as it is an upper 1% house.
jayedwin98020
Honestly, I'm trying to figure out what is the point. It's not a very handsome design, it doesn't seem to blend into the general landscape and now it appears you would have ongoing maintainence concern.
Eddy
I don't know if you get the English tv program Grand Designs but I have seen many more attractive designs on this program on this partially concealed with roof garden theme.