Architecture

Zome home is designed to last, while staying eco-friendly

Zome home is designed to last,...
When all is said and done, a single Zome will cost you $75,000
When all is said and done, a single Zome will cost you $75,000
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A claimed 90 percent of the Zome's building materials are recyclable
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A claimed 90 percent of the Zome's building materials are recyclable
In its standard configuration, the Zome has a diameter of 19 ft (5.8 m)
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In its standard configuration, the Zome has a diameter of 19 ft (5.8 m)
When all is said and done, a single Zome will cost you $75,000
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When all is said and done, a single Zome will cost you $75,000
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Having a little place out in the country might be nice, but the structure would be subject to some pretty harsh natural elements. Well, the Zome was invented with such concerns in mind, as it's designed to last up to a whopping 500 years – which isn't the same as saying that it actually will.

The US-based Zomes company is headed up by Egyptian-born brothers Shereef and Karim Bishay, who were inspired to create the zonohedron-shaped home in response to the increase in California brush fires. Besides designing something durable, they also wanted it to be as environmentally friendly as possible.

The overlapping-concrete-panel shell of each Zome therefore incorporates a magnesium-phosphate-based bioceramic cement, which is reportedly carbon-neutral. By contrast, the production of commonly used Portland cement is one of the main sources of greenhouse gases.

In its standard configuration, the Zome has a diameter of 19 ft (5.8 m)
In its standard configuration, the Zome has a diameter of 19 ft (5.8 m)

The 265-sq-ft (24.6-sq-m) interior of the structure features panels made of sustainably grown bamboo and formaldehyde-free adhesives. Rubber seals around the doors, windows and other openings keep it airtight, while sheep-wool insulation in the walls helps regulate the indoor temperature.

Among other things, use of the concrete is claimed to guarantee that the exterior of the Zome will be waterproof, mold-proof, rot-proof and pest-proof. It also shouldn't collapse under the weight of accumulated snow, and is fireproof up to 2,200 ºF (1,204 ºC) – although that doesn't mean the building's inhabitants would remain unharmed at such high temperatures.

Each Zome is factory-assembled to the buyer's specifications within two days, after which a crew travels with it to the installation site. It should subsequently be ready for use within one week. If the client later wishes to relocate the structure, it can be disassembled and moved.

A claimed 90 percent of the Zome's building materials are recyclable
A claimed 90 percent of the Zome's building materials are recyclable

If you'd like a Zome of your own, be prepared to put down a US$1,000 deposit followed by $64,000 due when the structure is ready to ship, followed in turn by $10,000 for shipping and installation – that's a total of $75,000. The company is presently only accepting orders from residents of California, and invites prospective buyers in other locations to register for updates on wider availability.

Source: Zomes

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6 comments
6 comments
Michael son of Lester
I like this and would love to order one, but I don't live in the delivery area. I know a perfect little property in Muskoka where one of these domes would be perfect. I know, it sucks to be me. 🙂

DavidB
Even with the additional cost of land to put it on, $75K for a quite usable–looking house seems very reasonable.
TomLeeM
I think that is a neat looking little house or retreat or 'get away from it all' place.
Lamar Havard
Sorry, not when you can get a Monolithic Dome the same size from Texas for around $30,000.
Slawdog
I do not understand the comments here. There is a reason none of us in the modern era are living in these dome structures which have been around forever and it starts with efficient use of interior space. I like the shelves in the diagram - everything is 12 inches tall. It would be cheaper and more efficient for minimalist occupancy to just make a box.
Matty E.
This is a cute idea, but a monolithic dome will give you triple the space for the same cost, and it'll be insulated like a thermos bottle. Plus, they laugh at falling trees and tornadoes.