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Segway's first robotic lawn mower uses GPS to stay on course

Segway's first robotic lawn mo...
Segway has introduced its first robotic lawnmower, the Navimow
Segway has introduced its first robotic lawnmower, the Navimower
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Segway has introduced its first robotic lawnmower, the Navimow
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Segway has introduced its first robotic lawnmower, the Navimower
The Navimow uses a form of GPS to maintain a positioning accuracy of 2 cm
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The Navimower uses a form of GPS to maintain a positioning accuracy of 2 cm
The Navimow operates at 54 dB, a little over half the noise of a typical lawnmower
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The Navimow operates at 54 dB, a little over half the noise of a typical lawnmower
The Navimow is waterproof, which makes for easy cleaning
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The Navimow is waterproof, which makes for easy cleaning
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Segway-Ninebot has rolled on into the autonomous lawn mower space with a robotic gardening solution that goes a little further than most, using GPS to navigate gardens with a high degree of precision. Low noise levels and easy cleaning are other noteworthy features of the newly introduced Navimow, which will arrive in a number of variants to suit lawns of different sizes.

Robotic lawn mowers are nothing new, with a number of takes on the technology gracing our pages over the past 18 years. Most of the solutions on the market today require installation of a perimeter wire, which acts as a virtual fence to keep the robot from straying into garden beds or other troublesome terrain. Some relative newcomers, however, like the Terra from iRobot, use standalone beacons and onboard mapping systems to stay within the desired areas.

The Navimow joins the wire-free clique of autonomous lawn mowers by relying on a GPS-based solution the company calls the Extra Fusion Locating System. Owners use the companion smartphone app to draw up the virtual boundary for their robotic gardener, and the Navimow uses onboard sensors to move around the lawn with a positioning accuracy of 2 cm (0.8 in), with the user receiving a smartphone alert if the virtual perimeter is breached.

The Navimow operates at 54 dB, a little over half the noise of a typical lawnmower
The Navimow operates at 54 dB, a little over half the noise of a typical lawnmower

The mower is also fitted with five safety sensors that enable it to detect and navigate obstacles, and a hub motor that powers it up inclines of 45 percent. The top-of-the-line model packs a 10.4-Ah battery that enables the mower to cover 3,000 sq m (32,300 sq ft) of lawn on each charge, though if it's running low on the job or detects rain, it will return to its charging station and then pick up where it left off at a later date.

The Navimow also operates at 54 dB, a little over half the noise levels of a typical mower, and features offset blades to reach the very edges and adjustable cutting heights to keep lawns to the desired length. Conveniently, it is also IPX6 waterproof rated, so it can simply be rinsed off when need be.

The Navimow is waterproof, which makes for easy cleaning
The Navimow is waterproof, which makes for easy cleaning

Segway is launching four versions of the Navimow, with the top-shelf, 10.4-Ah H3000E carrying a price tag of €2,500 (US$3,000). The entry-level H500E packs a 5.2-Ah battery and is suited for lawns spanning 500 sq m (5,381 sq ft) at a price of €1,199 (US$1,400), with those in between priced at €1,499 and €2,000 (US$1,800 and $2,400). The company is yet to reveal US shipping dates, but you can check out the full launch presentation below.

Segway Navimow New Product Launch

Source: Segway

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5 comments
5 comments
DaveWesely
I purchased a 2004 Robomower and used it for many years. It truly tried my patience. The biggest problem was its ability to get stuck. I don't think the Navimower has fixed this issue. The Robomower has two main drive wheels like the Navimower, but has one large grapefruit sized pivot wheel in front. The Navimower uses two small pivot wheels which will probably be even more prone to problems.
Not much is more irritating than finding your lawnmower stuck and digging a hole with the drive wheels. A robotic drive needs to be much more robust than your typical lawnmower assist. Either the drive needs a tracked system or there need to be three driven wheels, with the front one turned via servo.
Don't get me wrong. An intelligent location based robotic mower is much better than a perimeter wire system. No more perimeter ruts, mowing driveways, broken perimeter wire, missed corners and narrow spaces and other blind navigation issues. But a reliable drive system is paramount.
Nelson Hyde Chick
Here in the west we should be abandoning lawns on account of they are thirsty things and we are way past peak water.
Pablo
Just what the world needed... don’t address a serious need, burn resources on yet another way to sit on your fat butt and accelerate the onset of type two diabetes... oh, that’s right! You have the latest interactive exercise bike in your living room, and the subscription is only 50 bucks a month!
BlueOak
In case you're tempted to watch that very long winded promo video, jump all the way to the 9 minute mark where the actual Navimower product stuff starts.

Interesting how this Chinese company "westernizes" by having its European President do the (long) video intro.
christopher
About time! My LawnBott is gathering dust - it's just too "stupid" to use (cuts the same grass 100 times while completely missing other bits, gets stuck on stuff, and wonders off by itself in random directions when it forgets where the grass was - always an interesting job at the "end" trying to find where it's gone off too...)