Aircraft

Bell unveils V-280 Valor tiltrotor concept for U.S. Army program

Bell unveils V-280 Valor tiltr...
The V-280 Valor tiltrotor is Bell Helicopter's concept for the U.S. Army's Joint Multi Role (JMR)/Future Vertical Lift (FVL) program
The V-280 Valor tiltrotor is Bell Helicopter's concept for the U.S. Army's Joint Multi Role (JMR)/Future Vertical Lift (FVL) program
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The V-280 Valor in airplane mode
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The V-280 Valor in airplane mode
The V-280 Valor will have a combat range of 500 to 800 nautical miles
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The V-280 Valor will have a combat range of 500 to 800 nautical miles
The V-280 Valor will have a 280 knot cruising speed
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The V-280 Valor will have a 280 knot cruising speed
The V-280 Valor tiltrotor concept from Bell Helicopter
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The V-280 Valor tiltrotor concept from Bell Helicopter
The V-280 Valor comes in for a landing
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The V-280 Valor comes in for a landing
The V-280 Valor tiltrotor is Bell Helicopter's concept for the U.S. Army's Joint Multi Role (JMR)/Future Vertical Lift (FVL) program
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The V-280 Valor tiltrotor is Bell Helicopter's concept for the U.S. Army's Joint Multi Role (JMR)/Future Vertical Lift (FVL) program

Bell Helicopter has thrown its tiltrotor hat into the ring for the U.S. Army’s Joint Multi Role (JMR)/Future Vertical Lift (FVL) program with the unveiling of its V-280 Valor tiltrotor concept at the 2013 Army Aviation Association of America's (AAAA) Annual Professional Forum and Exposition in Fort Worth, Texas. The aircraft is up against an X2-based design from Boeing and Sikorsky, a coaxial design from AVX Aircraft, and a still unknown proposal from EADS.

Bell calls its offering a third generation tiltrotor, building on the experience gained from the first generation XV-3 and XV-15, to the second generation 609 civil tiltrotor and V-22 Osprey. Unlike the V-22, whose engines tilt along with the rotors, the engines of the V-280 remain fixed horizontally while the rotors and drive system tilt.

The wing is also straight rather than forward-swept like the V-22’s. This wing will be produced in one large piece and utilize Large Cell Carbon Core technology in an effort to reduce weight and manufacturing costs. This construction will also allow immediate detection of damage to the wing. The aircraft also features a V-tail, composite fuselage and a triple redundant fly-buy-wire flight control system.

The V-280 Valor in airplane mode
The V-280 Valor in airplane mode

The “V” in V-280 stands for “Vertical,” while the 280 refers to the aircraft’s 280 knot (322 mph/518 km/h) cruising speed. Designed as a medium class aircraft, the V-280 has space for a crew of four and 11 troops who can enter and exit through two six foot (1.8 m) wide side doors, which are also designed to increase door gunners' field of fire. Bell lists its combat range at 500 to 800 nautical miles (575 miles/926 km), with a self-deploy range of 2,100 nautical miles (2,417 miles/3,889 km).

The JMR Technology Demonstrator effort aims to develop a replacement medium-lift rotorcraft for the U.S. Army’s fleet of Sikorsky UH-60 Blackhawk and Boeing AH-64 Apache helicopters, with one or more of the aforementioned companies to be selected to build a prototype ready for take off in 2017.

Bell Helicopter looks to have sunk a bit of money into the following video showing how the V-280 might look when complete.

Source: Bell Helicopter

Bell V-280 Valor -- The Future of Vertical Lift Takes Flight

24 comments
Kaido Tiigisoon
Is that me or does someone else also notice the similarity of the fuselage of this aircraft and the one of UH-60 Blackhawk.
Ianspeed
Yep, first thing I noticed as well...UH-60 Blackhawk
Toffe Carling
So good that they tried to make an effort, but who shoots a green screen scene and have the camera man holding the cam? the background is moving all over the place. I sure wouldn't buy there helicopter if they cant even make simple things like that in the right way.
BigGoofyGuy
I think it is really cool. I think it could have a lot of civilian usage too. It would be great for use when transporting people and equipement to oil rigs or hard to reach places that don't have an airport but have just enough space for a helicopter but too far for a traditional helicopter to reach. I think having a civilian version could help reduce cost for the military; IMO.
Chris7527
If they played any Halo, they would have seen the same exact thing in the game long time ago...
citizenchan
Yeah, cool. And it's nice to know we are that much closer to having Skynet up and running.
jerryd
I've never figured out why they don't do tilt wing as lighter, stronger, more simple and likely cost less. The X-2 is a far better, more stable, less costly and lighter way though.
Seth Kazzim
fly-buy-wire? And yes Chris, I think is was the Falcon in Halo Reach, can't remember the Halo 3 one.
Dan_Linder
A great civilian use would be an upgrade to the standard helicopter air ambulances. Extensive capacity, and longer range when necessary.
michael_dowling
Modern gyroplanes would be better: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ubNbnahqcgg