Bicycles

Rizer tilts your bike to make stationary cycling more realistic

Rizer tilts your bike to make ...
The Rizer tilts bikes up by as much as 20 degrees on climbs, or down by a maximum of -10 degrees on descents
The Rizer tilts bikes up by as much as 20 degrees on climbs, or down by a maximum of -10 degrees on descents
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The Rizer works with both road and mountain bikes
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The Rizer works with both road and mountain bikes
The Rizer tilts bikes up by as much as 20 degrees on climbs, or down by a maximum of -10 degrees on descents
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The Rizer tilts bikes up by as much as 20 degrees on climbs, or down by a maximum of -10 degrees on descents
The Rizer features an aluminum tower and a steel/aluminum platform, it's claimed to be very stable thanks to its four adjustable-height feet, and can reportedly handle a maximum load of 264.5 lb (120 kg)
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The Rizer features an aluminum tower and a steel/aluminum platform, it's claimed to be very stable thanks to its four adjustable-height feet, and can reportedly handle a maximum load of 264.5 lb (120 kg)

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When using an interactive cycling program, the rider's real-life bike usually just sits flat, regardless of changes in the onscreen terrain. The Rizer, however, tilts the bicycle up and down to match the program's hills and valleys – while still allowing the user to steer.

Manufactured by Italian company Elite, the Rizer "gradient simulator" is designed to be used with a separate stationary trainer made either by Elite or a third party. While the back end of the bike is coupled to that trainer, its fork gets attached to the Rizer.

As the user proceeds to ride along an animated road on one of several compatible programs (such as the popular Zwift), the Rizer uses Bluetooth or ANT+ to wirelessly communicate with the tablet or laptop that's running the program. When climbs or descents occur in the onscreen environment, the Rizer responds by lifting the front of the bike by up to 20 degrees, or lowering it by as much as -10 degrees. Utilizing pushbutton controls or an accompanying iOS/Android app, users can also manually set the device to an angle of their choice.

The Rizer works with both road and mountain bikes
The Rizer works with both road and mountain bikes

Wahoo Fitness' existing Kickr Climb setup already offers similar functionality, although it keeps the fork and thus the handlebars locked in a straight-ahead orientation.

By contrast, the Rizer allows the fork and bars to be turned back and forth from side to side. According to Elite, this not only makes for a more realistic stationary cycling experience, but it also improves handlebar feel and comfort, plus it better works the muscle groups that would come into play when riding on actual roads. Plus, of course, it lets users virtually steer their cycling avatar within the program, which isn't possible with all platforms.

The device itself features an aluminum tower and a steel/aluminum platform, it's claimed to be very stable thanks to its four adjustable-height feet, and can reportedly handle a maximum load of 264.5 lb (120 kg). It's additionally said to be compatible with virtually all upright bikes, as it comes with its own thru-axle adapter.

The Elite Rizer should be available starting this fall (Northern Hemisphere), priced at US$1,099.99. It can be seen in action, albeit briefly, in the following video.

Elite Rizer | Step Up Your Ride

Source: Elite via BikeRumor

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1 comment
1 comment
Lee Bell
Interesting gadget. If you race bikes it would probably be a useful object to have and practice with.