Bicycles

Fasten system could make bicycle wheel removal a breeze

Fasten system could make bicyc...
The Fasten system simplifies rear wheel removal by keeping the cassette, brake rotor and bearings attached to the frame
The Fasten system simplifies rear wheel removal by keeping the cassette, brake rotor and bearings attached to the frame
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A cutaway view of the locking mechanism utilized in the Fasten system's thru-axle
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A cutaway view of the locking mechanism utilized in the Fasten system's thru-axle
The Fasten system simplifies rear wheel removal by keeping the cassette, brake rotor and bearings attached to the frame
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The Fasten system simplifies rear wheel removal by keeping the cassette, brake rotor and bearings attached to the frame
The Fasten system's thru-axle doesn't have to be completely removed, plus it incorporates a locking mechanism
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The Fasten system's thru-axle doesn't have to be completely removed, plus it incorporates a locking mechanism
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Removing and reinstalling a bike's rear wheel can be quite a laborious, frustrating process, as you have to wrangle the chain, derailleur and (if applicable) the disc brake. The new Fasten system, however, allows the wheel to quickly drop straight down out of the frame.

On most existing bikes, removal of the rear wheel involves shifting the chain to the smallest cog on the cassette, releasing the axle's quick release or yanking out the thru-axle, pulling the derailleur back out of the way, then pounding down on the wheel until it falls out. Putting it back in requires doing all of those steps in reverse, along with guiding the brake rotor to sit between the callipers.

Designed by French startup Lagar Concept, the Fasten system is intended to make things much easier. It incorporates a setup in which the cassette remains attached to the frame on the drive side, while the brake rotor remains attached on the other. The bearings are contained within housings in each of those units, not within the wheel.

This arrangement allows the wheel to have quite a simple, narrow hub, which slots into place between brackets on the inside ends of the cassette and brake rotor assemblies. Running through the setup from one side to the other is a thru-axle, which tightens everything down and locks it all together.

As a result, removal of the wheel involves simply loosening off the thru-axle and pulling it out, then allowing the wheel to drop out of the frame – the chain, derailleur and brake can be left alone. Putting it back in is just as simple.

The Fasten system's thru-axle doesn't have to be completely removed, plus it incorporates a locking mechanism
The Fasten system's thru-axle doesn't have to be completely removed, plus it incorporates a locking mechanism

As an added bonus, if the Fasten system is also being used in front, the front and rear wheels can be swapped back and forth – neither one is front- or rear-specific. Additionally, because the thru-axle doesn't have to be pulled completely out of the frame for wheel removal, there's no chance of losing it or dropping it in the dirt.

There's currently no word on how the weight of the system compares to that of a conventional setup, nor on when it might reach production. It should be noted, though, that Fasten would have to be built into bicycles by their manufacturers – it couldn't be retrofitted onto existing bikes. That said, Lagar Concept is promoting the notion that the technology could allow bicycle companies to pursue new types of transmissions or brakes, as long as they adopted Fasten as a wheel standard ... and the system did recently win an award at the Eurobike show.

You can see Fasten in use, in the video below.

The somewhat similar HubDock system, which we covered eight years ago, never reached its Kickstarter funding goal.

FASTEN, an innovative cycle design by Lagar Concept

Source: Lagar Concept via Pinkbike

View gallery - 3 images
14 comments
14 comments
paul314
It would take a little more thought to make this kind of thing compatible with an e-bike. For a lot of those you have to disconnect a bunch of wiring to pull the wheel.
Dave222
Yeah! Love it......but. Is there a cycle race where the wheel change time by the support car mechanic will make a difference? If a GC contender in a Grand tour punctures, the time loss is mitigated by the domestiques falling back and then riding their team mate back to the front. Also, dont they just throw down the whole bike and get a new one?
Idunno
Spectacular and convincing video. Although the application is narrow - road racers - it's still cool and novel.
minivini
I can’t imagine this method could provide a suitably light weight alternative for road or cross country racers. Now, this would be great for downhill bikes, e-bikes, and especially motorcycles.
Username
The lesson to take from the video is that when you get a tire puncture you should throw the whole wheel in the ditch.
joeblake
I use my bike to pull a mono-wheel trailer, which needs special axle nuts to be fitted. I don't see any way that these nuts could be fitted to this axle. Not for me.
Bradley Baysinger
Why is there so much space between the disc and the left flange?!
Ted Crunch
For the elitist who likes to show off his newest expensive toy. For the pro, it probably adds more weight. I never found it a hassle to remove the back wheel so this new Fasten wouldn't add much convenience to the bike.
anthony88
Great. Now can we make tyres that don't require inflating standard on all bikes sold?
BlueOak
Excellent! It is about time there was some innovation like this in bicycles.

The current drivetrain design has been pretty much in place for what, 50-60+ years? Yep, about time.
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