Bicycles

RoyalBees stationary bike is worth more than most bicycles

RoyalBees stationary bike is w...
The RoyalBees.bike, seen here with a gold finish and an optional belt drive setup
The RoyalBees.bike, seen here with a gold finish and an optional belt drive setup
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The RoyalBees.bike takes its name from the honeycomb-like structure of its titanium-coated aluminum alloy frame
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The RoyalBees.bike takes its name from the honeycomb-like structure of its titanium-coated aluminum alloy frame
The RoyalBees.bike, in a chrome finish
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The RoyalBees.bike, in a chrome finish
The RoyalBees.bike, seen here with a gold finish and an optional belt drive setup
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The RoyalBees.bike, seen here with a gold finish and an optional belt drive setup
The RoyalBees.bike features a laminated layer of wood or carbon fiber
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The RoyalBees.bike features a laminated layer of wood or carbon fiber
The RoyalBees.bike can be set up with a chain, cassette and derailleur
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The RoyalBees.bike can be set up with a chain, cassette and derailleur
The RoyalBees.bike features eight adjustable-height feet
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The RoyalBees.bike features eight adjustable-height feet
The RoyalBees.bike is compatible with virtual cycling platforms such as Zwift
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The RoyalBees.bike is compatible with virtual cycling platforms such as Zwift
View gallery - 7 images

As winter approaches in much of the world, many cyclists are faced with the depressing prospect of taking their riding indoors. Perhaps doing so wouldn't be such a drag, though, if they had something like the RoyalBees.bike to use.

Built by German firm Altinsoy Manufaktur, the RoyalBees stationary bicycle takes its name from the honeycomb-like structure of its titanium-coated aluminum alloy frame.

Managing director Faruk Altinsoy tells us that this "Triloc" system allows the frame to withstand vertical and torsional forces – and a rider weight of up to 150 kg (331 lb) – without requiring any welds. Instead, all of its parts are joined together using stainless steel or titanium screws. Eight adjustable-height feet keep the rig level on not-completely-flat floors.

The RoyalBees.bike features a laminated layer of wood or carbon fiber
The RoyalBees.bike features a laminated layer of wood or carbon fiber

Buyers can choose between a black, chrome or gold-colored titanium coating, plus there's a choice of a laminated layer of wood or carbon fiber on the RoyalBees' top surface and front end. The wood can in turn be walnut, ebony, Zebrano or teak, with a gloss or matte finish available for either it or the carbon.

German manufacturer SRM supplies some of the mechanical components, such as the magnetic resistance system and the integrated power meters – the latter allow for compatibility with cycling computers, performance-monitoring apps, and virtual cycling platforms like Zwift. Buyers can use their own bike's handlebars and saddle if desired, in order to make the indoor cycling experience a little more like what they're used to.

And no, the RoyalBees.bike is not cheap – Altinsoy informs us that pricing starts at €10,900 (about US$12,782). It's not alone in that range, though, as the bizarre-looking Ciclotte stationary bicycle comes in at $10,700.

Source: Bees via Pinkbike

View gallery - 7 images
6 comments
6 comments
martinwinlow
I pity the poor fellow that has to clean that (I'm guess from its price it won't be its owner!)...
clay
Looks ripe for a plywood and composite DUY version :-))
Dan Lewis
It's pretty, but if I can't charge up batteries with it, I have no use for it.
Odd, that the Germans would forget about practicality. Oh well.
Douglas Rogers
Fan resistance is a no brainer on these.
Seasherm
The title is misleading. It certainly costs more, but whether it is worth more is up to question.
Imran Sheikh
If looking beautiful was the purpose, then it has achieved the goal. Though they could have used some creativity for the handle and saddle as well.