Outdoors

One-pound backpack becomes a bivy tent in 30 seconds

One-pound backpack becomes a b...
When it comes time to setup camp, the BivyPack's carbon fiber frame slides out and expands the bivy as it goes
When it comes time to setup camp, the BivyPack's carbon fiber frame slides out and expands the bivy as it goes
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Inventor Kenny Flannery inside his BivyPack
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Inventor Kenny Flannery inside his BivyPack
The BivyPack's exterior is made from hex-grid ripstop nylon claimed to be highly waterproof and durable
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The BivyPack's exterior is made from hex-grid ripstop nylon claimed to be highly waterproof and durable
When it comes time to setup camp, the BivyPack's carbon fiber frame slides out and expands the bivy as it goes
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When it comes time to setup camp, the BivyPack's carbon fiber frame slides out and expands the bivy as it goes
When it comes to traipsing around the great outdoors, less is certainly more in terms of baggage
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When it comes to traipsing around the great outdoors, less is certainly more in terms of baggage
When it comes time to set up camp, the BivyPack's carbon fiber frame slides out and expands the bivy as it goes
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When it comes time to set up camp, the BivyPack's carbon fiber frame slides out and expands the bivy as it goes
The BivyPack's exterior is made from hex-grid ripstop nylon claimed to be highly waterproof and durable
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The BivyPack's exterior is made from hex-grid ripstop nylon claimed to be highly waterproof and durable
In backpack form, the new BivyPack meets the criteria for airline carry-on
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In backpack form, the new BivyPack meets the criteria for airline carry-on
In backpack form, the new BivyPack meets the criteria for airline carry-on
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In backpack form, the new BivyPack meets the criteria for airline carry-on
View gallery - 8 images

When it comes to traipsing around the great outdoors, less is certainly more in terms of baggage. That's why we always see such an emphasis on making adventure gear as light as possible, something Kenny Flannery can certainly lay claim to with his ultralight BivyPack.

The 1-lb (450-g) BivyPack was dreamt up by Flannery after more than a decade of non-stop travel, and is actually a more compact, lighter and refined follow-up to an earlier backpack-bivy tent combo he successfully crowdfunded in 2016.

In backpack form, the new BivyPack meets the criteria for airline carry-on and includes pockets on the outside for things like a water bottle and rain jacket that contribute to the pack's overall capacity of 40 L (10.5 gal).

The exterior is made from hex-grid ripstop nylon claimed to be highly waterproof and durable, which wraps around a carbon fiber frame thoughtfully shaped to create a space for ventilation between the pack and your back to avoid the build up of sweat. It is also fitted with adjustable hip and chest straps to help spread the load on longer hikes.

In backpack form, the new BivyPack meets the criteria for airline carry-on
In backpack form, the new BivyPack meets the criteria for airline carry-on

When it comes time to set up camp, the carbon fiber frame slides out and expands the bivy as it goes, turning into tent poles on either side of where your head will rest. The mesh fabric makes use of a breathable laminate film that Flannery says will let vapor from sweat and breath escape while offering resistance to rain (and bugs).

For extra protection, the bivy is designed so that a rain jacket can be clipped onto the outside, while a foot vent provides airflow through the other end. All up, the bivy measures 8.5 ft (2.6 m) long and 28 in (70 cm) across the shoulders. It is said to be suitable for people up to 6 ft 6 in (198 cm) tall.

Flannery has returned to Kickstarter to fund the upgraded BivyPack, and has set out to raise US$10,000 for production, with $5,300 collected in pledges at the time of writing. An early pledge of $299 will have one shipped your way in June if everything runs as planned.

You can check out the pitch video below.

Source: Kickstarter

BivyPack - The backpack that transforms into a bivy tent.

View gallery - 8 images
3 comments
jd_dunerider
This looks really cool, but without a stout padded waist belt, you won't be able to comfortably pack much weight in it. I once forgot to attach the belt to my pack before taking it on a weekend hiking getaway, and wow did I regret it. Packing it with more than about 20 pounds was absolute punishment on my body, where with the waist belt I can comfortably pack 55 pounds around all day. Kenny, if you read this, I highly recommend at least giving the option to attach a padded belt to put more weight on the hips! I made my own pack, and made it so I could attach the Molle II belt ($20 on Amazon).
StWils
From the photograph it appears that the bag is being demoed on a dry creek or river bed. This is ALWAYS A STUPID IDEA. Dry creek or river beds have an annoying habit of flash flooding, not infrequently at night. In which case this tight little bag serves nicely as a body bag for whomever finds the decedent down stream.
peter.jpg
What do you do with all of your stuff thats inside the backpack while you are sleeping?