Motorcycles

Bull-it Jeans' armored hoodie packs protection comparable to a set of leathers

Bull-it Jeans' armored hoodie ...
Bull-it Jeans' hoodie is lined with Covec, which was designed specifically to provide abrasion resistance for motorcycle apparel
Bull-it Jeans' hoodie is lined with Covec, which was designed specifically to provide abrasion resistance for motorcycle apparel
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Armor and mesh lining covering the Covec material inside a Bull-it Jeans armored hoodie
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Armor and mesh lining covering the Covec material inside a Bull-it Jeans armored hoodie
The backside of a Bull-it Jeans armored hoodie
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The backside of a Bull-it Jeans armored hoodie
The front of a Bull-it Jeans armored hoodie; outside it looks like a typical hoodie, inside is a protective lining made from Covec
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The front of a Bull-it Jeans armored hoodie; outside it looks like a typical hoodie, inside is a protective lining made from Covec
The backside of a Bull-it Jeans hoodie with Covec inside
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The backside of a Bull-it Jeans hoodie with Covec inside
The front side of a Bull-it Jeans hoodie with Covec inside
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The front side of a Bull-it Jeans hoodie with Covec inside
Bull-it Jeans' hoodie is lined with Covec, which was designed specifically to provide abrasion resistance for motorcycle apparel
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Bull-it Jeans' hoodie is lined with Covec, which was designed specifically to provide abrasion resistance for motorcycle apparel
Greg White of Greg's Garage TV models a Bull-it Jeans hoodie
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Greg White of Greg's Garage TV models a Bull-it Jeans hoodie
Greg White of Greg's Garage TV models a Bull-it Jeans hoodie
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Greg White of Greg's Garage TV models a Bull-it Jeans hoodie
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Your standard hoodie couldn't really be classified as protective motorcycle gear, but the popularity of hoodies in general has led to manufacturers like Speed and Strength and Bilt making armored versions for motorcyclists. Bull-it Jeans can now be added to that list, but its armored hoodie uses a relatively new material called Covec, which was designed specifically for motorcycle apparel and has abrasion resistance that's better than Kevlar and as good as some leathers.

According to Bull-it Jeans, when compared to regular cotton fabric hoodies, Kevlar-lined hoodies and even some leather jackets, Covec has a higher abrasion resistance, higher cut resistance and lower friction heat transfer. That means that should you leave your motorcycle unexpectedly and slide on, let’s say concrete, a hoodie made with Covec will reduce the chances of your skin coming into contact with the pavement.

Bull-it has gone to great lengths to be sure it can back up its claims. The company tested its products to meet the CE-13595-1 standard for protective clothing, which comprises three tests that grade impact abrasion, cut resistance and burst resistance. As a result of performance in the tests, Bull-it Jeans created its own slide rating system to indicate the amount of time it would take to slide on a hard surface before skin is exposed. For instance, apparel with an SR4 rating would take four seconds, SR6 would take six seconds and VoloCE seven seconds. The Bull-it Jeans hoodie has a rating of SR6.

While six seconds might not sound like a lot, it's a long time to be skidding across a hard surface. Covec also creates a barrier to prevent the transfer of heat during a slide so there’s reduced danger of getting a skin burn on top of road rash. Take a look at what this poor test "dummy" had to do to prove it.

Bull-it Pull-it

For the sake of comparison, in a 2011 test by Ride magazine, a pair of Hein Gericke leather pants came lasted 4.74 seconds, a set of Draggin' Kevlar Jeans made it to 3.07 seconds, Rev'It's Textile Trousers managed 0.71 seconds, and a regular pair of Levi's stonewash jeans lasted just 0.56 seconds.

With the exception of the hood itself, the entire Bull-It Jeans hoodie is lined with Covec, which in addition to protecting you during a fall and slide, is also claimed to be breathable and create a microclimate around your body to keep you cool in summer and warm in winter.

It also comes with a host of other features, including CE 1621 approved protectors in the back, shoulders and elbows, deep front pockets and a separate pocket for your cell phone, and a water-resistant finish to help keep you dry.

Make no mistake, this is not a four-season, all-purpose jacket. A good long rain might still leave you damp, and you’ll need to wear some base layers underneath when temperatures fall below 60° F (15° C). But at US$289.95 it is a viable alternative to a heavier synthetic jacket or even some thin leather jacket without armor.

The following video illustrates the various properties of Covec relative to other materials found in protective gear.

Source: Bull-it Jeans

What is Covec

View gallery - 8 images
3 comments
toller
With the loose fit of a hoodie, what is going to stop the elbow pads from moving away from your elbows or keep the sweatshirt from being pulled up as you slide? Not better than a purpose built protective jacket. Wait, it is purpose built.
Way better than plain daily garb. I'll look to see their other garments and riding pants.
Scion
The real benefit of these armoured clothes is that people who would otherwise not wear gear would feel comfortable wearing it which is better than nothing. I ride to work and it is a real pain to have to change clothes all the time so I usually don't. I do wear my draggin jeans and a leather jacket though. I know the jeans are as good as dedicated pants / leathers but then I'm only riding at 50-70km/hr so it isn't like I need much more protection. Add in a hoody to my collection sounds good as the leather jacket is heavy and awkward when not on the bike.
snave
Not convinced by the retention factor - any loose-fitting clothing is likely to suffer movement on contact withe ground, moving the armour out of the contact zone: Armour is worn closely-fitted to the body, with the abrasion protection layer over the top . Surely this also must impact (sorry, couldn't resist...) on the practicality ? Key to non-motorcycle clothing on a motorcycle comes at the other end when you get off and no longer need the armour protection - Interesting idea, but they don't include a CE-marked back protector so some of the convenience is lost already, plus they'd really need phase-change armout that hardens on impact to do this concept justice ?