Automotive

Caterham delves into past with delightfully retro Seven Sprint

Caterham delves into past with...
The Seven Sprint is a sixtieth birthday present to Caterham 
The Seven Sprint is a sixtieth birthday present to Caterham 
View 12 Images
Caterham is throwing back to the '60s with its latest variant
1/12
Caterham is throwing back to the '60s with its latest variant
Flared wheelarches are a classic Lotus 7 feature
2/12
Flared wheelarches are a classic Lotus 7 feature
The Seven Sprint is a sixtieth birthday present to Caterham 
3/12
The Seven Sprint is a sixtieth birthday present to Caterham 
The wood rimmed steering wheel is a lovely throwback touch
4/12
The wood rimmed steering wheel is a lovely throwback touch
Red leather bucket seats replace the normal black units 
5/12
Red leather bucket seats replace the normal black units 
Just 60 examples of the Sprint will be built 
6/12
Just 60 examples of the Sprint will be built 
The Seven Sprint comes in six period colors
7/12
The Seven Sprint comes in six period colors
Even the badge has been given the retro treatment 
8/12
Even the badge has been given the retro treatment 
Caterham has only had the rights to the Lotus 7 for 44 years, but it's been around since the 60s
9/12
Caterham has only had the rights to the Lotus 7 for 44 years, but it's been around since the 60s
The grille is another throwback, and looks fit for a sixties sportscar
10/12
The grille is another throwback, and looks fit for a sixties sportscar
Chrome polished hubcaps are something you don't see very often in 2016
11/12
Chrome polished hubcaps are something you don't see very often in 2016
The Seven Sprint looks at home on a British b-road 
12/12
The Seven Sprint looks at home on a British b-road 
View gallery - 12 images

Caterham's design philosophy isn't exactly overwhelmingly modern to begin with, so it's not a huge surprise to learn that the company has looked back in time to find inspiration for its latest offering. The new Seven Sprint uses the same underpinnings as the entry-level Seven 160, but all the details are firmly rooted in the 1960s.

The release of the Sprint is part of the company's "60 years of the Seven" celebrations, which will culminate with a bash at Donington Park next year. The Seven began as the Lotus 7 in 1957, and Caterham started building it under license from Lotus until 1973.

The main aim of the Seven Sprint is to take the modern(ish) Seven silhouette and punt it back to the swinging sixties. Sure, the silhouette is still largely the same as before, but the powder-coated chassis and rollover bar are almost identical to the ones you'd find on a period Series 2 Lotus 7.

Beyond the chassis, most of the changes to the Seven 160 are superficial styling touches. Gone are the one-piece brake lights and in their place are classic split units, working with the polished exhaust silencer, hubcaps and flared wheelarches to put forward a more classic appearance. Six colors are available, all of which featured on the 1960 palette.

The wood rimmed steering wheel is a lovely throwback touch
The wood rimmed steering wheel is a lovely throwback touch

If the exterior isn't enough to get the nostalgia flowing freely, the interior surely will. The bland buckets and chubby steering wheel are replaced with a set of gorgeous red leather seats and a wood-rimmed wheel. This might be derivative of the most basic interior Caterham offers, but it looks properly special in classic guise.

Under the hood, the Sprint's miniature power output is yet another throwback. Power comes from a three-cylinder Suzuki engine, pumping out just 80 hp (60 kW) and 107 Nm of torque. It's hooked up to the skinny rear tires through a five speed manual gearbox.

Pricing for the Sprint kicks off at £27,995 (US$37,310), which makes it £10,000 ($13,328) more expensive than the mechanically identical Seven 160. Only 60 examples will be built, and they'll all be sold to European and UK customers.

Caterham will launch the Seven Sprint at the Goodwood Revival this weekend.

Source: Caterham

View gallery - 12 images
5 comments
Bob Stuart
The Seven was a 50's car. By the 60's, it looked very retro.
unklmurray
I'd love to have one......It would have to have the steering moved to the left side....trying to drive a right handed side car in the U.S.of A. is a very dangerous game of which I choose to not play[Been there ....done that!! ] While you can do it .....you can't drive safely and I prefer to be safe!!.........LoL :-)
Martin Hone
12 pictures......some of the tail lights and indicators, one of the badge....but none of the engine !!!
DaveLight
Bring it here to the states I am in for one SOLD!
Imran Sheikh
cant you see the front fenders will create too much lift with that high angle of attack, more then enough to lift the front wheels creating dangerous scenarios, "Did you perform a Wind tunnel test, if not DO it Now" .