Architecture

Concept skyscraper rises from recycled waste of residents

Chartier-Corbasson architects has designed a concept skyscraper that would be built using the recycled waste of its inhabitants
Chartier-Corbasson architects has designed a concept skyscraper that would be built using the recycled waste of its inhabitants
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Chartier-Corbasson architects has designed a concept skyscraper that would be built using the recycled waste of its inhabitants
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Chartier-Corbasson architects has designed a concept skyscraper that would be built using the recycled waste of its inhabitants
The skyscraper would be built using panels made from recycled plastic (such as bottles) and paper
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The skyscraper would be built using panels made from recycled plastic (such as bottles) and paper
Waste materials would be sorted for recycling and refabricated on-site
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Waste materials would be sorted for recycling and refabricated on-site
The building's design is a pyramid shape and would allow for access to different levels by way of elevator
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The building's design is a pyramid shape and would allow for access to different levels by way of elevator
The skyscraper would grow almost organically as more waste materials were produced
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The skyscraper would grow almost organically as more waste materials were produced
The skyscraper would use a scaffolding structure inspired by the bamboo scaffolding used in Asia to enable the building's construction
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The skyscraper would use a scaffolding structure inspired by the bamboo scaffolding used in Asia to enable the building's construction
Rather than the scaffolding being removed once the building's construction is complete, it would then become part of the building
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Rather than the scaffolding being removed once the building's construction is complete, it would then become part of the building
Wind turbines would be built into the scaffolding tubes to generate electricity and contribute to the building's energy needs
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Wind turbines would be built into the scaffolding tubes to generate electricity and contribute to the building's energy needs

Green structures and buildings are a growing trend. Vertical gardens like the Clearpoint Residencies apartment block in Sri Lanka and The Living's Hy-Fi organic sculpture in New York are two examples. Now, Chartier-Corbasson has designed a concept for a skyscraper that would be built from the recycled waste of its occupants.

The Organic London Skyscraper concept seeks to show how the financial outlay required to build a skyscraper could be moderated. The idea proposes that the paper and plastic waste created by the existing residents or tenants of a building could be recycled and used to create panels for its continued construction. The building would grow using the waste of its residents and Chartier-Corbasson suggests that enough materials could be produced within a year to create the building's façade.

The building's design is a pyramid shape and would allow for access to different levels by way of elevator
The building's design is a pyramid shape and would allow for access to different levels by way of elevator

To minimize costs and make cash-flow more manageable, the proposal calls for waste materials to be collected and sorted within the building, which would then be refabricated on-site into construction panels. In addition, the quicker that vacant spaces within such a building are taken, the quicker construction would be completed due to the increased amount of recyclable waste being produced. In this way, the building is self-regulating.

Chartier-Corbasson proposes the use of a scaffolding structure inspired by the bamboo scaffolding used in Asia to enable the building's construction. The scaffolding is all one size and would be provided in prefabricated sections to simplify assembly. Rather than the scaffolding being removed once the building's construction is complete, it would then become part of the building.

Rather than the scaffolding being removed once the building's construction is complete, it would then become part of the building
Rather than the scaffolding being removed once the building's construction is complete, it would then become part of the building

The designers say that its hollow tubes would reduce wind impact and would contain small wind turbines for generating electricity to contribute to the building's energy needs.

The pyramid shaped building would allow for access to different levels by way of an elevator. Chartier-Corbasson says that there would be enough access via elevator to avoid the need for a tower crane. The building's design includes landings, lobbies, and spaces for areas such as gyms, conference rooms, restaurants, bars and an observation platform.

Source: Chartier-Corbasson

2 comments
Gadgeteer
Paging Wall-E.
Gregg Eshelman
Already got the nickname for this new high rise slum. Trash Towers.