Drones

Flytrex Sky drone set to deliver out of the box

An in-flight view of the Flytrex Sky carrying a soda
An in-flight view of the Flytrex Sky carrying a soda
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The Flytrex Sky is GoPro-ready
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The Flytrex Sky is GoPro-ready
Flytrex Sky comes equipped with eight hooks and a set of carrying bands
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Flytrex Sky comes equipped with eight hooks and a set of carrying bands
Flytrex Sky plays bartender
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Flytrex Sky plays bartender
An in-flight view of the Flytrex Sky carrying a soda
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An in-flight view of the Flytrex Sky carrying a soda
The Flytrex Pilot and Messenger Apps available for iOS and Android
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The Flytrex Pilot and Messenger Apps available for iOS and Android

While Amazon continues testing out its drone delivery service in North America, Israel-based Flytrex is already offering delivery drones and a 3G-based platform to send and receive small packages via a connected app. The company claims the Flytrex Sky, which was announced last week, is the first cloud-connected drone carrying an on-board 3G module designed to track the UAV and keep it jacked into the internet while in flight.

The Flytrex Sky platform logs all flights in an online profile accessible via the web and mobile apps. Theoretically, as long as the Sky has a 3G signal, its flying range is limited only by its dual battery, which provides approximately 35 minutes of flight time.

The Sky can be controlled via an installed RC transmitter and receiver system or GSM connection and also comes with a GoPro docking bay and is ready for first person view (FPV) flying and racing. Out of the box it can fly and connect to the Flytrex Messenger and Pilot apps available for iOS and Android devices. It's also capable of automatically returning to home, holding position in the air and autopilot.

As for deliveries, the Sky's frame is equipped with four hooks on each side and comes with two custom bands that can be used to attach a variety of small, lightweight parcels. Flytrex hasn't yet given out specific maximum weight specs, but says that battery efficiency is tied to payload.

Flytrex says pilots with no experience can fly the Sky using the Pilot app and its automated take-off, autopilot and landing features. It does not have built-in collision avoidance systems and isn't waterproof, so it requires a clear flight path with as little wind or rain as possible.

How the Sky is used will depend on the laws where you live. While you may be free to use the Flytrex system to start up your own delivery service in some locales, that's still not legal without a specific exemption from the FAA in the United States. It could legally be used for hobbyist or non-commercial deliveries, however.

The Flytrex Sky can be purchased directly from the company online. The retail price is listed at US$649, but as of this writing it shows up in the shopping cart for an introductory price of $549 plus shipping.

In the promotional video below, the drone is shown delivering basic items including a shirt and a sandwich.

Source: Flytrex

Flytrex Sky - The first delivery drone

6 comments
iperov
i see no drop function, so why its called delivery drone?
PoppyAnn
is there any way that it can avoid other drones in the air or is it down to dumb luck that your items arrive where you want them and not scattered around part way???
Gaëtan Mahon
Just take a look at this Video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bvVu3qfADgw being done by Professionals and take a reading on the Video Description what was necessary to get this successfully done. Now, with some common sense at hand, ask yourself if the idea to put this technology into the hands of amateurs is a good idea. I have an Endurance TBS Discovery PRO, which could be considered the bigger brother of the UAV in the Chocolate Video ( or the Cousin of the Flytrex Sky ) and think it a ridiculously bad idea to put such a System into the hands of someone not REALLY into it.
Matadorman
BAD Idea! Has anyone thought of the negative aspects of this. Bird strike Hawk/ large birds Etc. disables drone, falling drone where ? in street/ yard/ shopping plaza/ school/ side walk Etc. hits anything car windshield/ store window/ power line and worst of all a person young or old!! Thief follows your drone to landing site jumps out of car/ whatever throws a net over the drone and gone delivery and all. Smart ass with any numbers of weapons down comes drone and gone. Black market parts/ cameras and electronics. Or as the world knows there is no shortage of certain people that damage or break things(vandals) just for the Fun ?? of it. Multiple Company's that are only concerned with the flight path of there own drones. All this seems to me that they fall into the realm of regular people. What about hackers and electronic minded people with deliberate intensions to steal or sabotage and as we have seen on a you tube video there are people that don't like (hate) the things. I think they (drones) would be best served for emergency situations. Used by Fire/ police/ Medical personal and delivery of emergency items could still be at risk to all of the above, but a carefully calculated risk far more critical than the delivery of a probably warm beer or cola. Money could be better spent in making electronic delivery vehicles and keeping the human element in the Security and Safety of the deliveries, the personal touch not to mention Jobs. As I write more ideas pop up, Cost how much could you charge for the delivery of a single small item as depicted in the story, a beer or a coke? It would have to be substantial to cover the risk factors and of course the ever popular INSURANCE to offset the risks. Can you imagine the chaos if all cars where replaced with small personal helicopters. Well if the idea grows how could you control even the basic flow patterns of hundreds? thousands? of different companies using drones. Noise?? I think I will stop here as there are even more problems coming to mind !
Bob Flint
Do you really think that you would have time to get a shirt delivered, just as the person you are meeting motions you to come into his office? The kid needs better friends who would share a sandwich with him. Who put the bottle opener onto the drone? Did she forget it and then ordered one online? An expensive inefficient flying delivery machine, that may or may not deliver a warm drink that probably will explode in a messy ending as one still has to 1. install the package, 2. receive payment, 3. get flight approval, 4. successfully take off and arrive at destination when the receiver is awaiting. 5. hopefully be able to fly back to base (empty) before battery dies, or crash somewhere to be salvaged or deliberately pulled out of the sky by an angry predator (flying or ground based).
Douglas Bennett Rogers
It looks like it could fly cross country with charging stations every 35 min., or more, with the addition of solar cells.
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