Architecture

Busy Mexico City street to be reclaimed as green space and linear park

Busy Mexico City street to be ...
A main pedestrian promenade will run along the center of the avenue
A main pedestrian promenade will run along the center of the avenue
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A main pedestrian promenade will run along the center of the avenue
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A main pedestrian promenade will run along the center of the avenue
There will be new lanes added for buses, bikes, skaters, wheelchairs and strollers
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There will be new lanes added for buses, bikes, skaters, wheelchairs and strollers
Cultural Corridor Chapultepec will become a destination for meeting and for activity
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Cultural Corridor Chapultepec will become a destination for meeting and for activity

Plans have been unveiled to reclaim a road in Mexico City, Mexico, from cars. Avenida Chapultepec is one of the city's busy main arteries, but is clogged with cars and splits the city. The historical road will feature an elevated park with green spaces and a layout tailored for those on foot or bike.

Cultural Corridor Chapultepec is similar to the proposed Miami Underline, in that it is aimed at creating a more pedestrian-friendly route through its locale while following the route of existing transport infrastructure. Unlike the Underline, however, it will require the construction of an elevated section, as opposed to being created underneath an existing one.

Avenida Chapultepec runs from the Chapultepec Park to the Glorieta de los Insurgentes and is said to date back to at least as far as 1532. It is thought that the street follows the path of a Pre-Hispanic road. An aqueduct for providing water to Mexico City was also built along its route in the 18th century.

Now, it is hoped that a 0.8-mi (1.3-km) stretch of the road can be developed into a green urban space with a view to improving quality of life in the area. The firm behind the 452,085 sq ft (42,000 sq m) development, Fernando Romero Enterprise, says the scheme will "transform the context by recovering its history" and that it will become a destination for meeting and for activity.

There will be new lanes added for buses, bikes, skaters, wheelchairs and strollers
There will be new lanes added for buses, bikes, skaters, wheelchairs and strollers

At street level, a main promenade will run along the center of the avenue. Car lanes will be pushed to the sides so that the promenade width can be maximized to 57 m (187 ft) in places, and there will be new lanes added for buses, bikes, skaters, wheelchairs and strollers. Pedestrian crosswalks will provide access to the promenade and are designed to minimize the potential for accidents.

The new upper level will have a retail offering and an additional pedestrian promenade. It will feature green landscaping, with flora selected to provide shade to the public and regulate temperature. The planting will be irrigated using recycled rainwater, and solar cells will be employed to generate electricity.

The plans for the Corredor Cultural Chapultepec were presented by Fernando Romero last week and the project is expected to be completed by 2017.

Source: Fernando Romero Enterprise

1 comment
maak
Great, one more city that's taking urgently need roads that 95% of the people use to get to work and making them useless for commuting. It's just an attempt to remove cars and replace them with so called rapid transit. Portland Oregon has spent many billions for light rail and on the best day it can only run two or three percent of the commute at an average speed of nineteen miles per hour. Bad weather can shut down the system. For the same price they spent on just the first leg of the system they could have doubled the size of their bus system and endowed it with enough money to run the busses for free forever. And the busses aren't held to the rail lines; they can get around traffic problems, the trains can't. In all their wisdom they built the tracks at street level (instead of elevating them) and because Portland has short blocks that means the trains can only be two cars long to fit between cross streets when they stop. They continue to build more legs of the system even though EVERY time it comes up for a vote the people vote it down. The citizens know it's a stupid deal but the bureaucrats think they're smarter and find ways around the votes to continue building their stupid choo choo trains. There are cities where rail makes sense but only if you already have a system in place that includes things like elevators that moves massive numbers of people vertically and feed into the system and where major population/retail/employers are close to each other making the rail trip short and quick. Portland is spread out so elevators can't be included in their system and it takes a long time to move from one area of the city to another, two or three times the time for a car to do the same trip most times of the day and, of course, the rail line is mostly fed from walking distance on either side (and SOME bus service which is also slow) so it doesn't cover much of the city in a reasonable time.