Wearables

Dainese testing inflatable protective jacket in the workplace

Dainese testing inflatable pro...
If the Safety Jacket's sensors detect fall conditions, the electronic brain instructs the pneumatic system to inflate the protective airbags positioned around the body
If the Safety Jacket's sensors detect fall conditions, the electronic brain instructs the pneumatic system to inflate the protective airbags positioned around the body
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If the Safety Jacket's sensors detect fall conditions, the electronic brain instructs the pneumatic system to inflate the protective airbags positioned around the body
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If the Safety Jacket's sensors detect fall conditions, the electronic brain instructs the pneumatic system to inflate the protective airbags positioned around the body
The Safety Jacket has been designed to offer "maximum protection of the body parts exposed to trauma in the case of a fall from a height of up to two meters, a situation that does not require use of a harness"
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The Safety Jacket has been designed to offer "maximum protection of the body parts exposed to trauma in the case of a fall from a height of up to two meters, a situation that does not require use of a harness"
Dainese says that the Smart Jacket system can protect against "pendulum-effect" impacts for harness-wearing staff working above 2 meters
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Dainese says that the Smart Jacket system can protect against "pendulum-effect" impacts for harness-wearing staff working above 2 meters
The D-Air Safety Jacket prototype is currently undergoing real-world testing at Enel power stations
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The D-Air Safety Jacket prototype is currently undergoing real-world testing at Enel power stations
The appropriately-named Safety Jacket is based on D-Air technology already found in motorcycle and ski clothing
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The appropriately-named Safety Jacket is based on D-Air technology already found in motorcycle and ski clothing

The latest airbag-packing safety clothing to come out of the Dainese Group's D-Air Lab is a jacket aimed at protecting workers from impact due to a fall from on high. Currently undergoing testing in power stations, the appropriately-named Safety Jacket is based on D-Air technology already found in motorcycle and ski clothing.

This latest application of the D-Air safety technology is thanks to a collaboration with occupational health academics at Bologna's Università Alma Mater Studiorum and Policlinico di Sant'Orsola-Malpighi following a project brief from power company Enel.

The jacket is made up of two parts – electronic and pneumatic. The electronic system features three accelerometers and three gyroscopes that send continuous data to a computer brain running a sophisticated algorithm which looks for fall conditions.

Dainese says that the Smart Jacket system can protect against "pendulum-effect" impacts for harness-wearing staff working above 2 meters
Dainese says that the Smart Jacket system can protect against "pendulum-effect" impacts for harness-wearing staff working above 2 meters

If an accident occurs and staff working at height start to fall, the pneumatic part of the system is kicked into action, inflating airbags strategically positioned around the worker's body to offer "maximum protection of the body parts exposed to trauma in the case of a fall from a height of up to two meters, a situation that does not require use of a harness."

Dainese says that the system can also protect against "pendulum-effect" impacts for harness-wearing staff working above 2 meters.

The Safety Jacket prototype is currently undergoing real-world testing at Enel power stations, ahead of refinement and commercial production.

Source: Dainese

The latest airbag-packing safety clothing to come out of the Dainese Group's D-Air Lab is a jacket aimed at protecting workers from impact due to a fall from on high. Currently undergoing testing in power stations, the appropriately-named Safety Jacket is based on D-Air technology already found in motorcycle and ski clothing.

This latest application of the D-Air safety technology is thanks to a collaboration with occupational health academics at Bologna's Università Alma Mater Studiorum and Policlinico di Sant'Orsola-Malpighi following a project brief from power company Enel.

The jacket is made up of two parts – electronic and pneumatic. The electronic system features three accelerometers and three gyroscopes that send continuous data to a computer brain running a sophisticated algorithm which looks for fall conditions.

Dainese says that the Smart Jacket system can protect against "pendulum-effect" impacts for harness-wearing staff working above 2 meters
Dainese says that the Smart Jacket system can protect against "pendulum-effect" impacts for harness-wearing staff working above 2 meters

If an accident occurs and staff working at height start to fall, the pneumatic part of the system is kicked into action, inflating airbags strategically positioned around the worker's body to offer "maximum protection of the body parts exposed to trauma in the case of a fall from a height of up to two meters, a situation that does not require use of a harness."

Dainese says that the system can also protect against "pendulum-effect" impacts for harness-wearing staff working above 2 meters.

The Safety Jacket prototype is currently undergoing real-world testing at Enel power stations, ahead of refinement and commercial production.

Source: Dainese

4 comments
EZ
Gee, that looks like my fishing life vest--with an added electronic trigger rather than a disolvable fuse.
DaveWesely
This would improve safety for roofers and other elevated construction. I've used the rope/safety harness and it actually makes working on the roof more dangerous - the rope needs constant adjustment and if you step on the safety rope it can easily cause a fall. And you need anchors in place for it to work. This solves all of those problems.
CraigAllenCorson
It would have been really nice to see what it looks like INFLATED. I was curious about how well the head is protected.
MD
DaveWesely. Did you note the 2m restriction, and the reference to working on safety lines. Not a lot of roofing work is below 2m off the ground. If one wishes to work unhooked, pray that no injury results, or questions may be asked (leaving the one who made the decision liable) This device may reduce life-threatening injuries but will not overly improve outcomes for damaged limbs. PS will it auto inflate in water, I was hoping for a all condition safety jacket. simplifying rescue efforts (lifting points ready to go) in the case of aircraft ditching at sea or falling off rigs/vessels.