Energy

21 new plants to help transform Fukushima into a renewable energy hub

21 new plants to help transfor...
Solar, wind, hydro, geothermal and biomass combined to provide Japan's Fukushima prefecture with almost 1.5 GW of power in 2018
Solar, wind, hydro, geothermal and biomass combined to provide Japan's Fukushima prefecture with almost 1.5 GW of power in 2018
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Solar, wind, hydro, geothermal and biomass combined to provide Japan's Fukushima prefecture with almost 1.5 GW of power in 2018
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Solar, wind, hydro, geothermal and biomass combined to provide Japan's Fukushima prefecture with almost 1.5 GW of power in 2018

The wheels are in motion to breathe new life into the energy production of Fukushima, the Japanese prefecture that was devastated by the 2011 tsunami and nuclear meltdown. As reported by Tokyo-based newspaper Nikkei Asian Review, plans are afoot to transform the area into a renewable energy hub, with the power it generates to be fed into national grid for use in the country’s capital.

The government of Fukushima has actually been ramping up the region’s renewable energy production since the 2011 accident, which was triggered by a magnitude-9.0 earthquake that resulted in the plant being swamped by seawater and caused the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl.

Working towards an objective of powering the entire region with 100 percent renewable energy by 2040, wind, solar, hydro, geothermal and biomass combined to provide the Fukushima with almost 1.5 GW of electricity in 2018. This was up from around 1 GW in 2016 and around 400 MW in 2012.

The new construction project will add 11 new solar plants and 10 wind power plants to the mix, which will be constructed on unused farmlands and hilly terrain, according to Nikkei Asian Review. With a total cost of around US$2.75 billion over the coming five years, the new plants are expected to add a further 600 MW to Fukushima’s energy output.

A new 80-km (50-mi) grid is also in the works, which will feed this power into the metropolitan area of Tokyo. The Fukishima government expects renewables to provide 13 to 14 percent of Japan's national energy mix by 2030.

Sources: Government of Fukushima, Nikkei Asian Review

3 comments
anthony88
Well done. An earthquake and tsunami hitting this complex will not cause anything like the impact that nuclear fallout can have. No need for evacuations or massive cleanups and bags of radioactive topsoil across the prefecture. Just replace and connect new panels and recycle or dispose of the broken ones. 100% renewable power means cheaper electricity to power the manufacturing industries in the region, who may in fact install their own panels to be self-sufficient. Meanwhile, in Australia, where we have more hours of sunshine...
aksdad
So they're replacing a 4,700 megawatt power plant that provided reliable electricity 24/7 for 30+ years and survived a magnitude 9.0 earthquake with...wait for it...600 megawatts of solar PV and wind turbines that produce only 13% of the power, and only intermittently, so more like 7% of the power in real-world use. Instead of solving the rather simple engineering problem that caused the failure of the water coolant pumps that resulted in a reactor failure (and no deaths or serious injuries) they're resorting to 12th century technology. Never mind that the extraction of uranium from seawater can provide a billion years of power making nuclear power plants not only "green", fantastically efficient, reliable, and emissionless, but also essentially "renewable".
ljaques
It's too bad they're skittish about nuclear power now. Fukushima is equated to Three Mile Island, a minor mishap. Other than testing fish within the surrounding waters of the power plant, there are no side effects or fish killoffs of any sort. Anyway, more power to 'em (groan) for replacing nuke with wind/solar/geo.