Tiny Houses

Esk'et Tiny House is not your average tiny home

Esk'et Tiny House is not your ...
Tiny house enthusiasts Robert and Bettina Johnson from Alkali Lake, in British Columbia, Canada have recently completely their very own home
Tiny house enthusiasts Robert and Bettina Johnson from Alkali Lake, in British Columbia, Canada have recently completely their very own home
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The Esk'et home might not look like anything special from the outside, but its unique curved roof design allows for the maximum use of the interior space and extra high ceilings
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The Esk'et home might not look like anything special from the outside, but its unique curved roof design allows for the maximum use of the interior space and extra high ceilings
The living area was purposely designed to sacrifice on storage space in exchange for more open space and the sense of being a real home
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The living area was purposely designed to sacrifice on storage space in exchange for more open space and the sense of being a real home
Two slimline ladders lead to two separate elevated loft spaces
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Two slimline ladders lead to two separate elevated loft spaces
The interior of of the home features an open integrated living/dining and kitchen area
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The interior of of the home features an open integrated living/dining and kitchen area
The ikea kitchen was slightly modified for the tiny home
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The ikea kitchen was slightly modified for the tiny home
View from the loft above
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View from the loft above
The two lofts are perfect for sleeping quarters or just a quiet spot to relax
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The two lofts are perfect for sleeping quarters or just a quiet spot to relax
The bathroom doesn't miss a beat
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The bathroom doesn't miss a beat
Esk'et Tiny House features a surprisingly large and modern interior.
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Esk'et Tiny House features a surprisingly large and modern interior.
Robert Johnson who is Aboriginal Canadian and a carpenter by trade, along with his wife Bettina wanted to challenge themselves by building their very own tiny house, that would also honor the local land and aboriginal roots
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Robert Johnson who is Aboriginal Canadian and a carpenter by trade, along with his wife Bettina wanted to challenge themselves by building their very own tiny house, that would also honor the local land and aboriginal roots
Robert demonstrates just how much space there is inside the Esk'et tiny house
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Robert demonstrates just how much space there is inside the Esk'et tiny house
The interior of of the home features a propane fireplace and beautiful wooden floorboards
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The interior of of the home features a propane fireplace and beautiful wooden floorboards
The home features two doors and plenty of natural light
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The home features two doors and plenty of natural light
Robert sits at the cosy breakfast counter in the kitchen
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Robert sits at the cosy breakfast counter in the kitchen
The elevated bedroom features a curved roof, with plenty of head space
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The elevated bedroom features a curved roof, with plenty of head space
Robert illustrates just how much room there is to move
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Robert illustrates just how much room there is to move
A secret storage space is hidden within the wall cavity behind the shower
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A secret storage space is hidden within the wall cavity behind the shower
Step one, buy a 20 foot (approx 6 meters) trailer
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Step one, buy a 20 foot (approx 6 meters) trailer
The tiny home is built on top of a 20 foot (6.10 m) trailer
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The tiny home is built on top of a 20 foot (6.10 m) trailer
The floorspace has been extended by a 6 inch (15.25cm) overhang on both ends of the trailer and an additional 20 inch (50.8cm) overhang on one side
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The floorspace has been extended by a 6 inch (15.25cm) overhang on both ends of the trailer and an additional 20 inch (50.8cm) overhang on one side
The wooden home is built using traditional building methods
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The wooden home is built using traditional building methods
The interior starts to take form
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The interior starts to take form
The loft window shapes get made
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The loft window shapes get made
The home also features an air exchange unit for ventilation throughout the home and avoiding humidity
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The home also features an air exchange unit for ventilation throughout the home and avoiding humidity
The home is insulated using a closed-cell spray foam insulation
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The home is insulated using a closed-cell spray foam insulation
The exterior facade was built using pine, which was treated with the Shou Sugi Ban method
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The exterior facade was built using pine, which was treated with the Shou Sugi Ban method
The bathroom starts to take shape
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The bathroom starts to take shape
The kitchen starts to go in
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The kitchen starts to go in
Tiny house enthusiasts Robert and Bettina Johnson from Alkali Lake, in British Columbia, Canada have recently completely their very own home
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Tiny house enthusiasts Robert and Bettina Johnson from Alkali Lake, in British Columbia, Canada have recently completely their very own home
View gallery - 29 images

Tiny house enthusiasts Robert and Bettina Johnson from Alkali Lake in British Columbia, Canada, have recently completely their own 280 sq ft (26 sqm) home. Combining a surprisingly large and modern interior with a beautiful curved roofline and references to local art and tradition, this is one tiny home that stands apart.

RobertJohnson, a carpenter by trade, alongwith his wife Bettina wanted to challenge themselves by buildingtheir very own tiny house, that would also honorthe local land and aboriginal roots.

"Wesat down to draw our own design, and we knew we wanted to create anartsy and unique tiny house, with a flowing interesting roof shape,"Robert and Bettina told Gizmag. "We envisioned a house withcurves and an open feel, knowing that our vision for this tiny homewould be used as a guest home, for visitors to our area. We've calledthis first design the 'Esk'et Sqlelten' with 'sqlelten'being the Shuswap [an endangered Aboriginal language] word for'salmon', because of the salmon-shaped roof rafters."

The280 sq ft (26 sqm) wooden home is built on top of a 20 foot (6.10m) trailer. The floorspace has been extended by a 6 inch (15.25cm)overhang on both ends of the trailer and an additional 20 inch(50.8cm) overhang on one side. Measuring 8.4 ft(2.6 m) wide and 13.6 ft (4.15 m) high, itispossible for the home to be hooked up to a truck and moved todifferentlocations, however due to its extended shape it's the not easiest ofhomes to tow around, and not an ideal mobile home for those wanting totravel several times a year.

Theexterior facade was built using pine, which was treated with the ShouSugi Ban method (a traditional Japanese method for preserving wood),adding durability and a rustic look to the home. The home isinsulated using a closed-cell spray foam insulation and also featuresan air exchange unit for ventilation that reduces humidity. In the future Robert and Bettina also hope to incorporateoff-grid solutions into the home, such as solar panels.

Esk'et Tiny House features a surprisingly large and modern interior.
Esk'et Tiny House features a surprisingly large and modern interior.

Theinterior of of the home features an open integrated living/dining andkitchen area, with a propane fireplace and beautiful woodenfloorboards. Two slimline ladders lead to two separate elevatedlofts, perfect for sleeping quarters or just a quiet spot to relax.The home also features a full bathroom, with shower, toilet, basinand secret storage space hidden within the wall cavity behind theshower. The living area was purposely designed to sacrifice onstorage space in exchange for more open space and the sense of being in a real home.

"We'veleft room for a real couch with arms, and it's a super comfortableplace to relax in," says Robert and Bettina. "Our spiralingladder is also a winner! Not only does it look amazing, it functionsgreat – it is easy to climb up and down, with no handrails required."

The living area was purposely designed to sacrifice on storage space in exchange for more open space and the sense of being a real home
The living area was purposely designed to sacrifice on storage space in exchange for more open space and the sense of being a real home

Aseries of different shaped windows fill the home with natural light and a largepicture window in the living room allows guests to sit by thefireplace and enjoy the views from the surrounding landscape.

"Welove the incredible feeling of spaciousness, considering it is such asmall space," says Robert and Bettina. "The space flowsperfectly, thanks to the roof-line and the vaulted ceiling in thekitchen. The main sleeping loft has a completely separate feel, andbecause of the curved roof design it is very spacious. You step intothis house, and you don't want to leave."

The two lofts are perfect for sleeping quarters or just a quiet spot to relax
The two lofts are perfect for sleeping quarters or just a quiet spot to relax

Afterhaving completed the Esk'et Sqlelten tiny home last November, thecouple now plans to create and sell bespoke versions for othertiny home lovers. In addition, building plans for the Esk'et Tiny House will be available for purchase this year.

"Wehope to build more unique tiny houses with exceptional quality andwe would love to keep including Aboriginal artistic elements orcreative elements," say Robert and Bettina. "We are opento start building this year for a potential client ready to hire usfor a unique custom tiny house project."

Robert takes us on a tour in the video below.

Source: Esk'et Tiny House

Esk'et Sqlelten Tiny House Tour - Video 20 - Esk'et Tiny House

View gallery - 29 images
5 comments
Daishi
I'm actually pretty impressed with the design and use of space. I think with windows in tiny houses fewer and smaller is better because they require sacrificing too much insulation and wall space.
I like the 2nd door but it comes with the sacrifice of some wall space in the living room because now there is only room for a couch and a fireplace. If I could change anything I would go smaller on the living room window so that a TV/Monitor could be put on that wall to the right of the fireplace.
Part of the lighting/window need for the living room is already solved by the addition of the glass door next to it. Overall though I liked it and it's a good use of space.
Wild-Bill
I love the way Robert explains the design choices - impressive.
owlbeyou
Very interesting design. The white interior looks bright and airy. For the sake of lightness, I would have used smaller dimensional lumber. I think it is quite heavy. It's easy to heat a home this small, and an air exchanger can easily be replaced with open windows at the top and bottom and an oscillating fan for comfort. Two burners in the gas stove is more than enough. The fridge under the counter overhang can be a pain.
As for the aboriginal names, I hope Robert Johnson is a native because if he plans to market the design, it would not be cool. (He does seem to be one).
CharlieSeattle
It appears to be top heavy. How many times has it fallen over?
PatriciaAnneThompsonCastle
I love your Tiny House. We live in Alberta and plan to be Tiny House living very soon. How much are your plans and/or how much for you to build? Regards Patti