Architecture

Striking Forest House keeps it concreted and classy on wooded coastline

Striking Forest House keeps it...
The rooftop of the Forest House was designed as a green terrace to boost thermal insulation
The rooftop of the Forest House was designed as a green terrace to boost thermal insulation
View 36 Images
Exposed concrete mightn’t be the most sophisticated material you could choose to make a house, but we are continuing to see how when arranged in the right way it can make for a spectacular place to call homecompleted
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Exposed concrete mightn’t be the most sophisticated material you could choose to make a house, but we are continuing to see how when arranged in the right way it can make for a spectacular place to call homecompleted
The rooftop of the Forest House was designed as a green terrace to boost thermal insulation
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The rooftop of the Forest House was designed as a green terrace to boost thermal insulation
Concrete was chosen for the Forest House in part due to the low maintenance it requires
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Concrete was chosen for the Forest House in part due to the low maintenance it requires
Recently completed by local architecture firm Besonias Almeida, the Forest House is set on Argentina's Costa Esmeralda
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Recently completed by local architecture firm Besonias Almeida, the Forest House is set on Argentina's Costa Esmeralda
Almost every element of the Forest House is made with concrete, except for the decking, doors, windows, beds, sofas and chairs
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Almost every element of the Forest House is made with concrete, except for the decking, doors, windows, beds, sofas and chairs
The Forest House is made from three separate blocks that stagger down a gentle hillside
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The Forest House is made from three separate blocks that stagger down a gentle hillside
View of the open kitchen and dining area inside the Forest House, by Besonias Almeida
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View of the open kitchen and dining area inside the Forest House, by Besonias Almeida
The 150-sq-m (1,600-sq-ft) Forest House is built on a gentle slope
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The 150-sq-m (1,600-sq-ft) Forest House is built on a gentle slope
Small landscaped courtyards throughout the Forest House invite light and vegetation into the interior
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Small landscaped courtyards throughout the Forest House invite light and vegetation into the interior
Exposed concrete mightn’t be the most sophisticated material you could choose to make a house, but we are continuing to see how when arranged in the right way it can make for a spectacular place to call homecompleted
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Exposed concrete mightn’t be the most sophisticated material you could choose to make a house, but we are continuing to see how when arranged in the right way it can make for a spectacular place to call homecompleted
Concrete was chosen for the Forest House in part due to the low maintenance it requires
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Concrete was chosen for the Forest House in part due to the low maintenance it requires
Recently completed by local architecture firm Besonias Almeida, the Forest House is set on Argentina's Costa Esmeralda
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Recently completed by local architecture firm Besonias Almeida, the Forest House is set on Argentina's Costa Esmeralda
A living area opens up to a covered balcony in the Forest House, by Besonias Almeida
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A living area opens up to a covered balcony in the Forest House, by Besonias Almeida
A living area opens up to a covered balcony in the Forest House, by Besonias Almeida
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A living area opens up to a covered balcony in the Forest House, by Besonias Almeida
A living area opens up to a covered balcony in the Forest House, by Besonias Almeida
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A living area opens up to a covered balcony in the Forest House, by Besonias Almeida
The rooftop of the Forest House was designed as a green terrace to boost thermal insulation
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The rooftop of the Forest House was designed as a green terrace to boost thermal insulation
Recently completed by local architecture firm Besonias Almeida, the Forest House is set on Argentina's Costa Esmeralda
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Recently completed by local architecture firm Besonias Almeida, the Forest House is set on Argentina's Costa Esmeralda
The Forest House is made from three separate blocks that stagger down a gentle hillside
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The Forest House is made from three separate blocks that stagger down a gentle hillside
Almost every element of the Forest House is made with concrete, except for the decking, doors, windows, beds, sofas and chairs
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Almost every element of the Forest House is made with concrete, except for the decking, doors, windows, beds, sofas and chairs
The bedrooms are situated at the upper end of the Forest House and lead down to the central living area on the middle level
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The bedrooms are situated at the upper end of the Forest House and lead down to the central living area on the middle level
Bathroom inside the Forest House, by Besonias Almeida
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Bathroom inside the Forest House, by Besonias Almeida
Exposed concrete mightn’t be the most sophisticated material you could choose to make a house, but we are continuing to see how when arranged in the right way it can make for a spectacular place to call homecompleted
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Exposed concrete mightn’t be the most sophisticated material you could choose to make a house, but we are continuing to see how when arranged in the right way it can make for a spectacular place to call homecompleted
Concrete was chosen for the Forest House in part due to the low maintenance it requires
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Concrete was chosen for the Forest House in part due to the low maintenance it requires
View into the Forest House, by Besonias Almeida
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View into the Forest House, by Besonias Almeida
The bedrooms are situated at the upper end of the Forest House and lead down to the central living area on the middle level
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The bedrooms are situated at the upper end of the Forest House and lead down to the central living area on the middle level
Small landscaped courtyards throughout the Forest House invite light and vegetation into the interior
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Small landscaped courtyards throughout the Forest House invite light and vegetation into the interior
View into the Forest House, by Besonias Almeida
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View into the Forest House, by Besonias Almeida
The 150-sq-m (1,600-sq-ft) Forest House is built on a gentle slope
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The 150-sq-m (1,600-sq-ft) Forest House is built on a gentle slope
The rooftop of the Forest House was designed as a green terrace to boost thermal insulation
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The rooftop of the Forest House was designed as a green terrace to boost thermal insulation
The Forest House is made from three separate blocks that stagger down a gentle hillside
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The Forest House is made from three separate blocks that stagger down a gentle hillside
Almost every element of the Forest House is made with concrete, except for the decking, doors, windows, beds, sofas and chairs
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Almost every element of the Forest House is made with concrete, except for the decking, doors, windows, beds, sofas and chairs
The 150-sq-m (1,600 sq-ft) Forest House is built on a gentle slope
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The 150-sq-m (1,600 sq-ft) Forest House is built on a gentle slope
Concrete was chosen for the Forest House in part due to the low maintenance it requires
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Concrete was chosen for the Forest House in part due to the low maintenance it requires
Exposed concrete mightn’t be the most sophisticated material you could choose to make a house, but we are continuing to see how when arranged in the right way it can make for a spectacular place to call homecompleted
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Exposed concrete mightn’t be the most sophisticated material you could choose to make a house, but we are continuing to see how when arranged in the right way it can make for a spectacular place to call homecompleted
The rooftop of the Forest House was designed as a green terrace to boost thermal insulation
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The rooftop of the Forest House was designed as a green terrace to boost thermal insulation
Recently completed by local architecture firm Besonias Almeida, the Forest House is set on Argentina's Costa Esmeralda
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Recently completed by local architecture firm Besonias Almeida, the Forest House is set on Argentina's Costa Esmeralda
View gallery - 36 images

Exposed concrete mightn't be the most sophisticated material you could choose to make a house, but we are continuing to see how, when arranged in the right way, it can make for a spectacular place to call home. The Forest House on Argentina's Atlantic coastline takes this to the extreme, using concrete to cover almost every square inch, which actually works to blend in with the tones of its wooded surrounds.

Recently completed by local architecture firm Besonias Almeida, the Forest House is set on the Costa Esmeralda, a stretch of coastline in Argentina's east where the sand dunes are met with forests of acacia and maritime pine trees.

Recently completed by local architecture firm Besonias Almeida, the Forest House is set on Argentina's Costa Esmeralda
Recently completed by local architecture firm Besonias Almeida, the Forest House is set on Argentina's Costa Esmeralda

Because the 150-sq-m (1,600-sq-ft) house is built on a gentle slope, it is made from three separate blocks that stagger down the hillside at vertical intervals of 45 cm (17.7 in). Space is left for small landscaped courtyards in between that bring further light and vegetation into the interior.

Small landscaped courtyards throughout the Forest House invite light and vegetation into the interior
Small landscaped courtyards throughout the Forest House invite light and vegetation into the interior

Concrete was chosen for its low-maintenance requirements, its aesthetics and the spacious feel it creates. Indeed, almost every element of the Forest House is made with the material, except for the decking, doors, windows, beds, sofas and chairs.

The bedrooms are situated at the upper end of the house and lead down to the central living area on the middle level, which also serves as an open plan kitchen and dining area. From there, another small set of stairs leads down to a second living area complete with large windows, a fireplace and a covered balcony to sit back and enjoy nature.

The Forest House is made from three separate blocks that stagger down a gentle hillside
The Forest House is made from three separate blocks that stagger down a gentle hillside

The rooftop of the Forest House was designed as a green terrace to boost thermal insulation, while heating comes by way of an electric system beneath the floor.

If you'd like to see more of the lovely Forest House, there are plenty of images to peruse in the gallery.

Source: Besonias Almeida

View gallery - 36 images
2 comments
Brian M
Unfortunately concrete is still concrete and just looks like the remains of a 1940's German bunker. Imagine how nice it could have looked in a less stark, softer material!
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I for one, don't really care about good/unique/fashionable looks for ANY kind of building, but instead care a lot about max durability/strength against weather/earthquake/fire/flood, and also minimal maintenance costs!